The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Italian site U.K. site

The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission

Swift satellite artists conception Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions the Universe has seen since the Big Bang. They occur approximately once per day and are brief, but intense, flashes of gamma radiation. They come from all different directions of the sky and last from a few milliseconds to a few hundred seconds. So far scientists do not know what causes them. Do they signal the birth of a black hole in a massive stellar explosion? Are they the product of the collision of two neutron stars? Or is it some other exotic phenomenon that causes these bursts?

With Swift, a NASA mission with international participation, scientists have a tool dedicated to answering these questions and solving the gamma-ray burst mystery. Its three instruments give scientists the ability to scrutinize gamma-ray bursts like never before. Within seconds of detecting a burst, Swift relays its location to ground stations, allowing both ground-based and space-based telescopes around the world the opportunity to observe the burst's afterglow. Swift is part of NASA's medium explorer (MIDEX) program and was launched into a low-Earth orbit on a Delta 7320 rocket on November 20, 2004. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Neil Gehrels (NASA-GSFC).

NASA's Swift Produces Best Ultraviolet Maps of the Nearest Galaxies
Nearly a million ultraviolet sources appear in this mosaic of the Large Magellanic Cloud, which was assembled from 2,200 images taken by Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. The 160-megapixel image required a cumulative exposure of 5.4 days. The image includes light from 1,600 to 3,300 angstroms -- UV wavelengths largely blocked by Earth's atmosphere -- and has an angular resolution of 2.5 arcseconds at full size. The LMC is about 14,000 light-years across. Credit: NASA/Swift/S. Immler (Goddard) and M. Siegel (Penn State)
Nearly a million ultraviolet sources appear in this mosaic of the Large Magellanic Cloud, which was assembled from 2,200 images taken by Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. The 160-megapixel image required a cumulative exposure of 5.4 days. The image includes light from 1,600 to 3,300 angstroms -- UV wavelengths largely blocked by Earth's atmosphere -- and has an angular resolution of 2.5 arcseconds at full size. The LMC is about 14,000 light-years across. Credit: NASA/Swift/S. Immler (Goddard) and M. Siegel (Penn State) (Read More)

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Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

This meeting will celebrate 10 years of Swift successes and will provide the opportunity to review recent advances on our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. The conference will be held from December 2-5, 2014 at La Sapienza University in Rome, Italy.

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Latest Swift News

Sep 30, 2014

NASA's Swift Mission Observes Mega Flares from a Mini Star

On April 23, NASA's Swift satellite detected the strongest, hottest, and longest-lasting sequence of stellar flares ever seen from a nearby red dwarf star. The initial blast from this record-setting series of explosions was as much as 10,000 times more powerful than the largest solar flare ever recorded.
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Sep 30, 2014

Swift Cycle 11 GI Program

NASA received 165 proposals, requesting a total observing time of 14.1 Ms and $5.3M in funds for 1,044 targets. Considering PIs and Co-Is, about 500 individual scientists responded to the Swift Cycle 11 call. The Swift Cycle 11 Peer Review will be held in December to evaluate the merits of submitted proposals. Results will be posted in late December 2014.

Jul 11, 2014

Out of An Hours-long Explosion, A Stand-In For The First Stars

Astronomers analyzing a long-lasting blast of high-energy light observed in 2013 report finding features strikingly similar to those expected from an explosion from the universe's earliest stars. If this interpretation is correct, the outburst validates ideas about a recently identified class of gamma-ray burst and serves as a stand-in for what future observatories may see as the last acts of the first stars.
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