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The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission

Swift satellite artists conception Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions the Universe has seen since the Big Bang. They occur approximately once per day and are brief, but intense, flashes of gamma radiation. They come from all different directions of the sky and last from a few milliseconds to a few hundred seconds. So far scientists do not know what causes them. Do they signal the birth of a black hole in a massive stellar explosion? Are they the product of the collision of two neutron stars? Or is it some other exotic phenomenon that causes these bursts?

With Swift, a NASA mission with international participation, scientists have a tool dedicated to answering these questions and solving the gamma-ray burst mystery. Its three instruments give scientists the ability to scrutinize gamma-ray bursts like never before. Within seconds of detecting a burst, Swift relays its location to ground stations, allowing both ground-based and space-based telescopes around the world the opportunity to observe the burst's afterglow. Swift is part of NASA's medium explorer (MIDEX) program and was launched into a low-Earth orbit on a Delta 7320 rocket on November 20, 2004. The Principal Investigator is Dr. Neil Gehrels (NASA-GSFC).

NASA's Swift Reveals a Black Hole Bull's-eye
Rings of X-ray light centered on V404 Cygni, a binary system containing an erupting black hole (dot at center), were imaged by the X-ray Telescope aboard NASA's Swift satellite from June 30 to July 4. A narrow gap splits the middle ring in two. Color indicates the energy of the X-rays, with red representing the lowest (800 to 1,500 electron volts, eV), green for medium (1,500 to 2,500 eV), and the most energetic (2,500 to 5,000 eV) shown in blue. For comparison, visible light has energies ranging from about 2 to 3 eV. The dark lines running diagonally through the image are artifacts of the imaging system.
Rings of X-ray light centered on V404 Cygni, a binary system containing an erupting black hole (dot at center), were imaged by the X-ray Telescope aboard NASA's Swift satellite from June 30 to July 4. A narrow gap splits the middle ring in two. Color indicates the energy of the X-rays, with red representing the lowest (800 to 1,500 electron volts, eV), green for medium (1,500 to 2,500 eV), and the most energetic (2,500 to 5,000 eV) shown in blue. For comparison, visible light has energies ranging from about 2 to 3 eV. The dark lines running diagonally through the image are artifacts of the imaging system. Credits: Andrew Beardmore (Univ. of Leicester) and NASA/Swift (Read More)

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All Swift systems are operating normally.

Latest Swift News

Apr 6, 2016

Swift takes aim at the first gravitational wave transient GW150914

On 2015 September 14 the Advanced LIGO experiment detected with high significance its first signal of gravitational waves (GWs). The event, dubbed GW150914, lasted only 0.2 s and was likely produced by the merger of two heavy black holes, about 30 times the mass of the Sun. Despite the event's poor localization (~590 square degrees), a large number of space-based and ground-based observatories pointed at that region of the sky in order to detect the electromagnetic signal emitted by the GW source. Swift observations were focused on nearby galaxies within the GW error region. No new sources were found in the 4.7 square degrees that were covered. A paper describing the results of the Swift campaign is now accepted for publication on MNRAS Letters.

Jan 19, 2016

Swift Cycle 12 Results

Swift Cycle 12 Recommended Targets and Proposals have been posted.
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Nov 6, 2015

NASA's Swift Spots its Thousandth Gamma-ray Burst

NASA's Swift spacecraft has detected its 1,000th gamma-ray burst (GRB). GRBs are the most powerful explosions in the universe, typically associated with the collapse of a massive star and the birth of a black hole.
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