The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Italian site U.K. site

Swift Cycle 10 Results

The lists below contain the proposals recommended by the Cycle 10 Peer Review panel. Note that in addition to the accepted programs below, ToO requests for exceptional transients will continue to be possible through the Swift ToO web site, even for ToOs not accepted into the GI Program. The decision on whether or not to observe a ToO of either category will be made by the Swift Principal Investigator.

PIs of Cycle 10 proposals for observation: Please note that the Cycle 10 ROSES 2013 Appendix D.5 "Swift Guest Investigator Cycle 10" states:

"It is the responsibility of the PI to alert the Swift Observatory Duty Scientist when trigger conditions for their accepted ToO have been met. This is done through the Swift ToO Request Form at https://www.swift.psu.edu/secure/toop/too_request.htm. It is highly recommended that ToO proposers register as Swift ToO users in advance at https://www.swift.psu.edu/secure/toop/too_newuser.php. Registration is required in order to submit a ToO Request."

ToO proposals must have an astrophysical trigger. Once the trigger criteria have been met for an approved target, the PI should check if the target location is more than 5 hours in RA from the Sun and more than 20 degrees from the Moon before requesting Swift observations (http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Tools/Viewing.html). ToO observations that require more than 6 ks on a given day and are closer to the Sun than 5 hours RA will be less likely to be approved unless they are of exceptionally high scientific priority. Observations greater than 9 hours in RA from the Sun are particularly desirable. The purpose of the anti-Sun restriction for ToOs is to maximize the amount of time Swift is pointed toward the night sky in order to optimize optical follow-up observations of BAT-detected GRBs.

Accepted Cycle 10 ToO proposals may be triggered between April 1, 2014, and March 31, 2015.

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Recommended Proposals

Prop    PI              	Title
1013012 ANDREON, STEFANO THE SWIFT X-RAY UNBIASED VIEW OF LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS 1013013 WOODWARD, CHARLES SYNOPTIC SWIFT TOO X-RAY/UV OBSERVATIONS A BRIGHT NOVA IN OUTBURST 1013026 GRUPE, DIRK LONG-TERM VARIABILITY OF THE SED OF NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES 1013028 UKWATTA, TILAN SWIFT LOCALIZATION AND FOLLOW-UP OF HAWC TRANSIENTS 1013035 JORSTAD, SVETLANA GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS IN QUIESCENT VS. ACTIVE STATES 1013058 JORSTAD, SVETLANA MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR FLARES 1013071 BOGDANOV, SLAVKO OBSERVING THE NEXT X-RAY BINARY - RADIO-MILLISECOND RADIO PULSAR TRANSITION 1013073 PROCHASKA, JASON GRB AFTERGLOWS AS PROBES 1013080 BODEWITS, DENNIS THE ACTIVITY AND EVOLUTION OF OORT CLOUD COMETS 1013084 PERKINS, JEREMY FERMI-LAT INITIATED TOO'S FOR BRIGHT FLARING GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS 1013086 AJELLO, MARCO BL LAC OBJECTS AT THE HIGHEST REDSHIFTS 1013116 BOGGS, STEVEN TOO OBSERVATIONS OF GRBS DETECTED WITH THE NCT BALLOON PAYLOAD 1013119 DEGENAAR, NATHALIE CONTINUING A SWIFT LEGACY: THE MONITORING CAMPAIGN OF THE GALACTIC CENTER 1013122 TOMSICK, JOHN BLACK HOLE TRANSIENTS DURING OUTBURST DECAY 1013124 TOMSICK, JOHN BLACK HOLE TRANSIENTS IN THE HARD STATE: CONSTRAINING THE SYSTEM GEOMETRY WITH NUSTAR AND SWIFT 1013125 CURRAN, PETER EXTREMELY BROADBAND MONITORING OBSERVATIONS OF LMXBS 1013129 SAKAMOTO, TAKANORI SWIFT RAPID FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF MAXI XRFS 1013136 FOLEY, RYAN UV SPECTROSCOPY/PHOTOMETRY OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE 1013140 CHORNOCK, RYAN RAPID OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF SWIFT GRBS: COSMIC REIONIZATION, METAL ENRICHMENT, AND HIGH-Z HOSTS 1013143 GODET, OLIVIER X-RAY MONITORING OF THE BEST INTERMEDIATE MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE HLX-1 IN ESO 243-49 1013144 FALCONE, ABE THE LARGEST FLARES FROM KNOWN TEV GAMMA RAY BLAZARS: SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS WITH TOOS 1013145 REYNOLDS, CHRISTOPHER OPTICAL/UV/X-RAY VARIABILITY OF THE BARE AGN FAIRALL 9 1013149 D'AMMANDO, FILIPPO SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OF A GAMMA-RAY FLARING RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 1013150 GLIOZZI, MARIO SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE CENTRAL ENGINE IN AGN: SWIFT MONITORING OF THE BARE AGN ARK 120 1013160 GE, JIAN HUNTING HIGH-Z GRBS WITH THE FIRST NEAR-IR IFU SPECTROGRAPH ON A 2M ROBOTIC TELESCOPE 1013163 OJHA, ROOPESH INVESTIGATING THE ANOMALOUS BEHAVIOR OF EXTREME BLAZARS 1013170 SUNTZEFF, NICHOLAS SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERLUMINOUS AND 2002CX-LIKE TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE 1013194 CORCORAN, MICHAEL X-RAY MONITORING OF \EC\ DURING ITS 2014 PERIASTRON PASSAGE 1013198 HODGES-KLUCK, EDMUND MAPPING ULTRAVIOLET HALOS IN A MINI-SURVEY OF NEARBY STARBURST GALAXIES 1013203 VESTERGAARD, MARIANNE THE IMPACT OF THE IONIZING SED AND SOURCE INCLINATION ON QUASAR BLACK HOLE MASS MEASUREMENTS 1013204 WALTER, FREDERICK SSS TURN-ON AND TURN-OFF TIMES OF CLASSICAL NOVAE 1013205 PAGE, MATHEW DECOUPLING LUMINOSITY AND EVOLUTION IN THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF AGN 1013211 MEHDIPOUR, MISSAGH CONTINUED SWIFT MONITORING OF NGC 5548 1013218 BELOBORODOV, ANDREI EARLY AFTERGLOW EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS 1013224 TOMSICK, JOHN UNDERSTANDING THE HARD X-RAY COMPONENT FROM NEUTRON STAR TRANSIENTS 1013225 BODAGHEE, ARASH SWIFT TOO OBSERVATIONS OF HARD X-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM THE INNER GALAXY 1013229 KASLIWAL, MANSI UNDERSTANDING YOUNG SUPERNOVAE AND EXOTIC TRANSIENTS WITH SWIFT AND IPTF 1013235 MCMAHON, TIM MULTIFOLD S/N AMPLITUDE IMPROVEMENT AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF GRB AND NON-GRB POINT SOURCES IN SWIFT'S BAT SURVEY 1013244 CURTIS, JASON UV OBSERVATIONS OF THE OLDEST NEARBY STAR CLUSTER RUPRECHT 147 1013248 CORSI, ALESSANDRA UNRAVELING THE MISSING LINK BETWEEN 1998BW-LIKE SNE AND GRBS 1013263 NELSON, THOMAS SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE EARLIEST X-RAY EMISSION IN NOVAE 1013264 CHAKRABARTY, DEEPTO STUDYING THE ONSET OF PROPELLER ACCRETION IN SAX J1808.4-3658 WITH NUSTAR AND SWIFT 1013267 YOUNG, JASON ANCHORING THE BLUE END OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS DISK GALAXY SEDS 1013275 LIEN, AMY CHASING SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH SWIFT AND FERMI 1013288 ROMING, PETE USING THE UV LEVER ARM TO PROBE TYPE IIN SUPERNOVAE SHELLS

Recommended Targets

Definition of Columns

  1. Proposal: Proposal number assigned by Swift mission
  2. PI: Principal Investigator's last name
  3. Target_Num: Target number as listed on the proposal form
  4. Target_Name: Target name as listed on proposal forms
  5. RA: Right Ascension (equinox J2000) in degrees
  6. Dec: Declination (equinox J2000) in degrees
  7. Time: Total observing time approved, in ksec
  8. ToO: "Y" if Target of Opportunity proposal, otherwise "N"

Prop   |PI          |Target_Num|Target_Name         |RA      |Dec     |Time |ToO|
1013012|ANDREON     | 1        |CL1014              |175.2993|  5.7348|  8.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     | 2        |CL1015              |182.5700|  5.3858|  8.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     | 3        |CL1030              |206.1357|  2.9539| 16.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     | 4        |CL1034              |192.3087| -1.6872|  6.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     | 5        |CL1038              |179.4658|  5.0603|  8.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     | 6        |CL1049              |188.8987|  1.7753|  4.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     | 7        |CL1067              |212.0616|  5.4656|  5.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     | 8        |CL1120              |188.6292|  3.9761| 14.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     | 9        |CL1122              |211.9530|  5.3625|  9.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     |10        |CL1132              |195.1428| -2.1339| 12.0|N  |
1013012|ANDREON     |11        |CL1134              |184.3693|  4.1833|  4.0|N  | 
1013012|ANDREON     |12        |CL1256              |216.0688|  2.7903| 18.0|N  | 
1013012|ANDREON     |13        |CL1225              |188.9546|  1.8696| 10.0|N  | 
1013012|ANDREON     |14        |CL2007              | 46.5722| -0.1400|  5.0|N  | 
1013013|WOODWARD    | 1        |NOVA                |  0.0000|  0.0000| 60.0|Y  | 
1013026|GRUPE       | 1        |TON S 180           | 14.3342|-22.3825|  1.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       | 2        |RX J0117.5-3826     | 19.3775|-38.4417|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       | 3        |MS 0117-28          | 19.8987|-28.3589|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       | 4        |RX J0134.2-4258     | 23.5704|-42.9742|  4.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       | 5        |RX J0136.9-3510     | 24.2267|-35.1644|  4.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       | 6        |RX J0148.3-2758     | 27.0929|-27.9739|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       | 7        |MKN 1044            | 37.5229| -8.9981|  1.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       | 8        |RX J0323.2-4931     | 50.8158|-49.5197|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       | 9        |VCV0331-37          | 53.4175|-37.1153|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |10        |RX J0349.1-4711     | 57.2821|-47.1844|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |11        |FAIRALL 303         | 67.6667|-53.6156|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |12        |RX J0439.6-5311     | 69.9112|-53.1919|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |13        |RX J0900.5-0700     |135.1400| -7.0011|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |14        |MKN 110             |141.3042| 52.2867|  1.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |15        |RX J1007.1+2203     |151.7925| 22.0506|  4.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |16        |MKN 142             |156.3804| 51.6764|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |17        |RX J1034.6+3938     |158.6608| 39.6411|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |18        |RX J1117.1+6522     |169.2921| 65.3686|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |19        |Z 1136+3412         |174.8079| 33.9142|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |20        |RX J1209.8+3217     |182.4383| 32.2839|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |21        |PG 1211+143         |183.5737| 14.0536|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |22        |MKN 766             |184.6108| 29.8128|  1.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |23        |CBS 150             |188.4238| 31.0175|  4.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |24        |MCG+08-23-067       |189.2133| 45.6514|  4.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |25        |IRAS F12397+3333    |190.5442| 33.2842|  1.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |26        |PG 1244+026         |191.6467|  2.3692|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |27        |RX J1304.2+0205     |196.0708|  2.0936|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |28        |RX J1314.3+3429     |198.5946| 34.4942|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |29        |RX J1319.9+5235     |199.9879| 52.5925|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |30        |IRAS 13349+2438     |204.3279| 24.3842|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |31        |RX J1355.2+5612     |208.8192| 56.2125|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |32        |PG 1402+261         |211.3175| 25.9261|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |33        |QSO J1421-0013      |216.0158| -0.4494|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |34        |MKN 684             |217.7671| 28.2872|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |35        |MKN 478             |220.5312| 35.4397|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |36        |PG 1448+273         |222.7867| 27.1575|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |37        |MKN 493             |239.7904| 35.0300|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |38        |RX J1618.1+3619     |244.5392| 36.3328|  4.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |39        |KUG 1618+40         |244.9638| 40.9800|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |40        |EXO 1627+4014       |247.2554| 40.1333|  4.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |41        |RX J1702.5+3247     |255.6296| 32.7889|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |42        |II ZW 136           |323.1162| 10.1389|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |43        |RX J2216.8-4451     |334.2217|-44.8658|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |44        |RX J2217.9-5941     |334.4858|-59.6917|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |45        |RX J2242.6-3845     |340.6571|-38.7544|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |46        |MS 2254-36          |344.4125|-36.9353|  2.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |47        |RX J2258.9-2609     |344.6892|-26.1539|  3.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |48        |RX J2301.8-5508     |345.4667|-55.1419|  4.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |49        |RX J2304.6-3501     |346.1554|-35.0203|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |50        |RX J2317.8-4422     |349.4579|-44.3744|  5.0|N  | 
1013026|GRUPE       |51        |MS 23409-1511       |355.8692|-14.9250|  2.0|N  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     | 1        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 14.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     | 2        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 14.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     | 3        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 14.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     | 4        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 14.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     | 5        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 14.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     | 6        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 14.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     | 7        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     | 8        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     | 9        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     |10        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     |11        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013028|UKWATTA     |12        |VHE TRANSIENT       |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     | 1        |CTA26               | 54.8787| -1.7766| 12.0|N  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     | 2        |PKS0420-014         | 65.8158| -1.3425|  6.0|N  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     | 3        |0829+046            |127.9537|  4.4942| 12.0|N  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     | 4        |0836+710            |130.3517| 70.8951|  3.0|N  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     | 5        |0954+658            |149.6967| 65.5653|  6.0|N  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     | 6        |PKS1055+018         |164.6233|  1.5663|  6.0|N  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     | 7        |1308+326            |197.6196| 32.3455| 12.0|N  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     | 8        |1611+343            |243.4212| 34.2133| 12.0|N  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     | 9        |3C345               |250.7450| 39.8103| 12.0|N  | 
1013035|JORSTAD     |10        |OT081               |267.8867|  9.6502|  6.0|N  | 
1013058|JORSTAD     | 1        |BLAZAR1             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 24.0|Y  | 
1013058|JORSTAD     | 2        |BLAZAR2             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 24.0|Y  | 
1013058|JORSTAD     | 3        |BLAZAR3             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 24.0|Y  | 
1013071|BOGDANOV    | 1        |PSR                 |  0.0000|  0.0000|100.0|Y  | 
1013080|BODEWITS    | 1        |C/2013 A1 (SIDING SP|  0.0000|  0.0000| 27.3|N  | 
1013080|BODEWITS    | 2        |C/2012 K1 (PANSTARRS|  0.0000|  0.0000| 27.3|N  | 
1013084|PERKINS     | 1        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     | 2        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     | 3        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     | 4        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     | 5        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     | 6        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     | 7        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     | 8        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     | 9        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |10        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |11        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |12        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |13        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |14        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |15        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |16        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |17        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |18        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |19        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013084|PERKINS     |20        |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013086|AJELLO      | 1        |2FGL J0630.9-2406   | 97.7479|-24.1126|  5.0|N  | 
1013086|AJELLO      | 2        |2FGL J1918.2-4110   |289.5667|-41.1919| 15.0|N  | 
1013086|AJELLO      | 3        |2FGL J0022.2-1853   |  5.5382|-18.8925|  7.0|N  | 
1013086|AJELLO      | 4        |2FGL J0811.1-7527   |122.7636|-75.5076|  5.0|N  | 
1013086|AJELLO      | 5        |2FGL J1338.9+1152   |204.7460| 11.8881|  7.0|N  | 
1013086|AJELLO      | 6        |2FGL J1303.1+2435   |195.7635| 24.5654|  8.0|N  | 
1013116|BOGGS       | 1        |NCT GRB #1          |  0.0000|  0.0000| 70.0|Y  | 
1013116|BOGGS       | 2        |NCT GRB #2          |  0.0000|  0.0000| 70.0|Y  | 
1013116|BOGGS       | 3        |NCT GRB #3          |  0.0000|  0.0000| 70.0|Y  | 
1013116|BOGGS       | 4        |NCT GRB #4          |  0.0000|  0.0000| 70.0|Y  | 
1013119|DEGENAAR    | 1        |GALACTIC CENTER     |266.4000|-28.9833|248.0|N  | 
1013122|TOMSICK     | 1        |BH TRANSIENT        |  0.0000|  0.0000| 57.0|Y  | 
1013124|TOMSICK     | 1        |BH HARD STATE       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 20.0|Y  | 
1013124|TOMSICK     | 2        |BH HARD STATE       |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013124|TOMSICK     | 3        |BH HARD STATE       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013125|CURRAN      | 1        |LMXB_1              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 59.0|Y  | 
1013125|CURRAN      | 2        |LMXB_2              |  0.0000|  0.0000|  1.0|Y  | 
1013129|SAKAMOTO    | 1        |MAXI_XRF1           |  0.0000|  0.0000| 12.0|Y  | 
1013129|SAKAMOTO    | 2        |MAXI_XRF2           |  0.0000|  0.0000| 12.0|Y  | 
1013136|FOLEY       | 1        |SN 1                |  0.0000|  0.0000| 60.0|Y  | 
1013136|FOLEY       | 2        |SN 2                |  0.0000|  0.0000| 60.0|Y  | 
1013143|GODET       | 1        |ESO 243-49          | 17.6179|-46.0728| 78.0|N  | 
1013144|FALCONE     | 1        |1ES 0033+595        |  8.9692| 59.8344| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     | 2        |B3 0133+388         | 24.1358| 39.0998| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     | 3        |RGB J0152+017       | 28.1652|  1.7880| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     | 4        |IC 310              | 49.1793| 41.3248| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     | 5        |1ES 0647+250        |102.6937| 25.0499| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     | 6        |1ES 1011+496        |153.7672| 49.4335| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     | 7        |1ES 1215+303        |184.4670| 30.1168| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     | 8        |PKS 1222+216        |186.2269| 21.3796| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     | 9        |3C 279              |194.0465| -5.7893| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |10        |1ES 1440+122        |220.7010| 12.0111| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |11        |1ES 1727+502        |262.0776| 50.2196| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |12        |1ES 1741+196        |265.9910| 19.5858| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |13        |HESS J1943+213      |295.9792| 21.3022| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |14        |VCS1 J2001+4352     |300.3036| 43.8813| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |15        |MRK 421             |166.1138| 38.2088| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |16        |H 1426+428          |217.1358| 42.6747| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |17        |MRK 501             |253.4676| 39.7602| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |18        |1ES 1959+650        |299.9994| 65.1485| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |19        |BL LAC              |330.6804| 42.2778| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |20        |1ES 2344+514        |356.7705| 51.7050| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |21        |1ES 1218+304        |185.3414| 30.1770| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |22        |1ES 1553+113        |238.9293| 11.1901| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |23        |MRK 180             |174.1100| 70.1576| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |24        |1ES 0806+524        |122.4550| 52.3162| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |25        |W COMAE             |185.3820| 28.2329| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |26        |3C 66A              | 35.6650| 43.0355| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |27        |PKS 1424+240        |216.7517| 23.8000| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |28        |RGB J0710+591       |107.6252| 59.1389| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |29        |1ES 0229+200        | 38.2025| 20.2882| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |30        |RBS 0413            | 49.9658| 18.7594| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |31        |1ES 0414+009        | 64.2184|  1.0901| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |32        |1ES 0502+675        | 76.9846| 67.6233| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |33        |VER J0521+211       | 80.4792| 21.1900| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |34        |RXJ0648.7+1516      |102.1979| 15.2733| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |35        |S5 0716+714         |110.4727| 71.3434| 10.0|Y  | 
1013144|FALCONE     |36        |B3 2247+381         |342.5241| 38.4103| 10.0|Y  | 
1013145|REYNOLDS    | 1        |FAIRALL 9           | 20.9408|-58.8056|100.0|N  | 
1013149|D'AMMANDO   | 1        |LAT AGN             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 50.0|Y  | 
1013150|GLIOZZI     | 1        |ARK 120             | 79.0475| -0.1497| 90.0|N  | 
1013163|OJHA        | 1        |PKS 1424-418        |216.9845|-42.1054|125.0|N  | 
1013170|SUNTZEFF    | 1        |SC_SN               |  0.0000|  0.0000| 56.0|Y  | 
1013170|SUNTZEFF    | 2        |CX_SN               |  0.0000|  0.0000| 36.0|Y  | 
1013194|CORCORAN    | 1        |ETA CAR             |161.2650|-59.6845|156.0|N  | 
1013198|HODGES-KLUCK| 1        |NGC 3079            |150.4908| 55.6798|  6.0|N  | 
1013198|HODGES-KLUCK| 2        |NGC 3628            |170.0707| 13.5897|  9.0|N  | 
1013198|HODGES-KLUCK| 3        |NGC 4666            |191.2858| -0.4619|  6.0|N  | 
1013198|HODGES-KLUCK| 4        |NGC 7582            |349.5979|-42.3706|  6.0|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD | 1        |Q1311-270           |198.4473|-27.2804| 11.0|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD | 2        |Q1402-012           |211.1912| -1.5061| 24.0|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD | 3        |Q1442+101           |221.3186|  9.9767|  8.0|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD | 4        |Q1542+042           |236.2476|  4.1296|  8.0|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD | 5        |Q1626+115           |247.9386| 11.9342|  4.5|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD | 6        |Q0226-038           | 37.2217| -3.6270|  6.0|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD | 7        |Q0238+100           | 40.3424| 10.3131| 18.0|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD | 8        |Q2212-299           |333.8168|-29.7398|  7.0|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD | 9        |Q0038-019           | 10.3583| -1.7208|  9.0|N  | 
1013203|VESTERGAARD |10        |Q0106+013           | 17.1615|  1.5834|  6.0|N  | 
1013204|WALTER      | 1        |V723 CAS            | 16.2725| 54.0112|  5.0|N  | 
1013204|WALTER      | 2        |V959 MON            | 99.9114|  5.8981|  5.0|N  | 
1013204|WALTER      | 3        |V598 PUP            |106.4279|-38.2450|  5.0|N  | 
1013204|WALTER      | 4        |V1280 SCO           |254.4205|-32.3434|  5.0|N  | 
1013204|WALTER      | 5        |N SGR 2012          |266.3668|-23.0897|  5.0|N  | 
1013204|WALTER      | 6        |V5558 SGR           |272.5770|-18.7811|  5.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        | 1        |SDSS160913.18+535429|242.3049| 53.9082| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        | 2        |SDSS074417.47+375317|116.0728| 37.8881| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        | 3        |SDSS074815.44+220059|117.0643| 22.0165| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        | 4        |SDSS075928.29+301028|119.8679| 30.1745| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        | 5        |SDSS081520.66+273617|123.8361| 27.6047| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        | 6        |SDSS082012.62+431358|125.0526| 43.2329| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        | 7        |SDSS090812.18+514700|137.0507| 51.7836| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        | 8        |SDSS090910.09+012135|137.2920|  1.3599| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        | 9        |SDSS091011.01+463617|137.5459| 46.6049| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |10        |SDSS091921.56+504855|139.8398| 50.8154| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |11        |SDSS095227.30+504850|148.1138| 50.8139| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |12        |SDSS100943.56+052953|152.4315|  5.4983| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |13        |SDSS104542.18+525112|161.4257| 52.8535| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |14        |SDSS115120.46+543733|177.8353| 54.6259| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |15        |SDSS120127.43+090040|180.3643|  9.0113| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |16        |SDSS120556.09+104253|181.4837| 10.7150| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |17        |SDSS121529.56+533555|183.8732| 53.5989| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |18        |SDSS122339.34+461118|185.9139| 46.1885| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |19        |SDSS122409.91+500155|186.0413| 50.0321| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |20        |SDSS132909.25+480109|202.2885| 48.0194| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |21        |SDSS133749.64+550102|204.4568| 55.0173| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |22        |SDSS134213.27+602142|205.5553| 60.3619| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |23        |SDSS134934.65+534117|207.3944| 53.6881| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |24        |SDSS143253.73+460343|218.2239| 46.0622| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |25        |SDSS150031.81+483646|225.1325| 48.6130| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |26        |SDSS150759.06+020053|226.9961|  2.0149| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |27        |SDSS154515.89+432953|236.3162| 43.4981| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |28        |SDSS155416.50+513218|238.5687| 51.5386| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |29        |SDSS161806.32+422532|244.5263| 42.4256| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |30        |SDSS163302.10+392427|248.2587| 39.4076| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |31        |SDSS163402.95+390000|248.5123| 39.0002| 10.0|N  | 
1013205|PAGE        |32        |SDSS170648.07+321422|256.7003| 32.2397| 10.0|N  | 
1013211|MEHDIPOUR   | 1        |NGC 5548            |214.4980| 25.1368| 75.0|N  | 
1013224|TOMSICK     | 1        |AQL X-1             |287.8169|  0.5849| 30.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    | 1        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    | 2        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    | 3        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    | 4        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    | 5        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    | 6        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    | 7        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    | 8        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    | 9        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013225|BODAGHEE    |10        |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    | 1        |IPTFSWIFT1          |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    | 2        |IPTFSWIFT2          |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    | 3        |IPTFSWIFT3          |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    | 4        |IPTFSWIFT4          |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    | 5        |IPTFSWIFT5          |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    | 6        |IPTFSWIFT6          |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    | 7        |IPTFSWIFT7          |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    | 8        |IPTFSWIFT8          |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    | 9        |IPTFSWIFT9          |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    |10        |IPTFSWIFT10         |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    |11        |IPTFSWIFT11         |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013229|KASLIWAL    |12        |IPTFSWIFT12         |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  | 
1013244|CURTIS      | 1        |R147-P1             |289.0208|-16.4417|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      | 2        |R147-P1             |289.0208|-16.4417|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      | 3        |R147-P1             |289.0208|-16.4417|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      | 4        |R147-P2             |289.0208|-16.1750|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      | 5        |R147-P2             |289.0208|-16.1750|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      | 6        |R147-P2             |289.0208|-16.1750|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      | 7        |R147-P3             |289.2792|-16.1750|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      | 8        |R147-P3             |289.2792|-16.1750|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      | 9        |R147-P3             |289.2792|-16.1750|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      |10        |R147-P4             |289.2792|-16.4417|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      |11        |R147-P4             |289.2792|-16.4417|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      |12        |R147-P4             |289.2792|-16.4417|  5.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      |13        |R147-RGWD           |288.5114|-15.9016|  1.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      |14        |R147-RGWD           |288.5114|-15.9016|  1.0|N  | 
1013244|CURTIS      |15        |R147-RGWD           |288.5114|-15.9016|  1.0|N  | 
1013248|CORSI       | 1        |1ST SN              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 20.0|Y  | 
1013248|CORSI       | 2        |2ND SN              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 20.0|Y  | 
1013248|CORSI       | 3        |3RD SN              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 25.0|Y  | 
1013263|NELSON      | 1        |NOVA 1              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 60.0|Y  | 
1013263|NELSON      | 2        |NOVA 2              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 60.0|Y  | 
1013264|CHAKRABARTY | 1        |SAX J1808.4-3658    |272.1151|-36.9787|  5.0|Y  | 
1013264|CHAKRABARTY | 2        |SAX J1808.4-3658    |272.1151|-36.9787| 45.0|Y  | 
1013267|YOUNG       | 1        |UGC 00628           | 15.2160| 19.4760|  2.3|N  | 
1013267|YOUNG       | 2        |UGC 00731           | 17.6830| 49.6020|  3.6|N  | 
1013267|YOUNG       | 3        |UGC 11748           |321.9160| 45.4830|  1.0|N  | 
1013267|YOUNG       | 4        |UGC 11820           |327.3680| 14.2310|  6.6|N  | 
1013267|YOUNG       | 5        |UGC 02885           | 58.2680| 35.5920|  1.5|N  | 
1013267|YOUNG       | 6        |UGC 01230           | 26.3850| 25.5210|  6.8|N  | 
1013267|YOUNG       | 7        |F415-3              | 38.1890| 28.8410|  2.1|N  | 
1013267|YOUNG       | 8        |F583-5              |236.4340| 17.3140|  7.1|N  | 
1013267|YOUNG       | 9        |F584-2              |240.4550| 18.7210|  2.2|N  | 

Proposal Abstracts

1013012 / STEFANO ANDREON / OSSERVATORIO ASTRONOMICO DI BRERA

"THE SWIFT X-RAY UNBIASED VIEW OF LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS"

Scaling relations of galaxy clusters have been generally derived from X-ray selected samples, which have proven inadequate, since they offer a biased view of the cluster population, and the scale relations derived from them could be misleading. We propose here to measure scaling relations, such as L X-M, L X-T, based on an 'X-ray unbiased sample' of 44 clusters in the nearby Universe. To complete the sample, which was approved in A08 and A09 but only partially observed, we require 127 ks (if no other observation of our running program will be carried out) for the remaining 14 clusters.

 

1013013 / CHARLES E. WOODWARD / UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

"SYNOPTIC SWIFT TOO X-RAY/UV OBSERVATIONS A BRIGHT NOVA IN OUTBURST"

We propose a 60 ks Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) campaign for one (1) bright classical or recurrent nova in outburst using the rapid response and multi-wavelength capabilities of Swift to obtain simultaneous gamma-ray, X-ray and ultraviolet (UV) observations. Swift provides unique insight into the novae phenomena during all the evolutionary phases, revealing many new and currently poorly understood events including phases of persistent hard X-rays as well as episodes of rapid and variable X-ray/UV emission. Swift ToO, supplemented with data from Fermi/LAT monitoring and our extant space- and ground-based OIR programs will grow the temporal and panchromatic archive of these events, requisite to glean the underlying physics of these new phenomena and novae evolution.

 

1013026 / DIRK GRUPE / PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"LONG-TERM VARIABILITY OF THE SED OF NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES"

We propose to re-observe a sample of 51 X-ray bright Narrow-Line Seyfert 1s with Swift in order to study the long-term variability of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The first goal of this program is to understand how important long-term variability is for the scatter found in the relations among AGN, e.g. the alpha-ox - luminosity relation and the correlations with the Eddington ratio. The second goal is to catch at least one of these AGN in a deep minimum X-ray flux state in order to trigger our ongoing, recently re-approved XMM-Newton ToO program with the aim to investigate in detail the X-ray spectra during these low states.

 

1013028 / TILAN NIRANJAN UKWATTA / MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT LOCALIZATION AND FOLLOW-UP OF HAWC TRANSIENTS"

We propose a Swift Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) campaign to follow-up GeV/TeV transients detected by the HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) observatory. HAWC is a ground based very-high energy detector with a large field-of-view (FoV) and near continuous operation. HAWC is sensitive to gamma-rays in the energy range from ~30 GeV to 100 TeV and will be used to conduct real-time searches for flaring GeV/TeV emission from known sources and for random transients in its FoV. The uncertainty of a transient location (~ 1 deg) reported by HAWC is too large for other observatories to perform follow up observations in lower energy bands. Hence, we propose to follow-up significant HAWC transients with Swift and in the case of uncataloged transients localize them using XRT tiling observations.

 

1013035 / SVETLANA G. JORSTAD / BOSTON UNIVERSITY

"GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS IN QUIESCENT VS. ACTIVE STATES"

We propose to observe with the XRT and UVOT (all 6 filters) 10 blazars from a sample of gamma-ray blazars that we monitor at optical/near-IR (OIR) wavelengths and with the VLBA at 43 GHz. We determine gamma-ray, X-ray, and OIR spectral indices of each target in quiescent and active states to study the physical processes responsible for high-energy photon production. The proposed sources possess an insufficient number of X-ray and UV observations to measure their properties in quiescence. We request 3 Swift observations of each blazar during our scheduled OIR observations at Lowell Observatory. This Cycle 10 program will allow us to complete our study of spectral indices and SEDs in quiescent states as well as add to the analysis how the spectral indices change as the flux state varies.

 

1013058 / SVETLANA G. JORSTAD / BOSTON UNIVERSITY

"MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR FLARES"

We propose to observe 3 blazars with the XRT at 0.3-10 keV and UVOT (all 6 filters) over a 2 week period during a flaring state. The targets are from the list of gamma-ray blazars that we monitor with the VLBA at 43 GHz and at optical wavelengths. For each blazar in the sample, the triggering criteria are based on its history of gamma-ray and optical behavior. We will determine (1) the lag between the synchrotron and Compton light curves at various frequencies, (2) the dependence of spectral index on wavelength, (3) relative amplitudes and timescales of variability at different wavebands, and (4) the timing of changes in VLBI images at mm wavelengths relative to outbursts at shorter wavelengths. This information is needed for theoretical modelling of high energy production in blazars.

 

1013071 / SLAVKO BOGDANOV / COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY INC.

"OBSERVING THE NEXT X-RAY BINARY - RADIO-MILLISECOND RADIO PULSAR TRANSITION"

The recent detection of the X-ray transient IGR J18245-2452 switching back and forth between accreting and rotation-powered pulsar states has finally established the long-suspected evolutionary connection between low-mass X-ray binaries and "recycled" radio pulsars. The fact that this source was a previously known recycled radio pulsar implies that similar objects are also nascent recycled pulsars that still sporadically revert to an accreting phase. We propose a Swift XRT/UVOT target of opportunity observation of the next nearby binary radio millisecond pulsar to switch to and from an accreting state. This effort would greatly aid in obtaining a better understanding of the transition process of pulsars between accretion and rotation power.

 

1013073 / JASON XAVIER PROCHASKA / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (SANTA CRUZ)

"GRB AFTERGLOWS AS PROBES"

We propose a 60 ks Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) campaign for one (1) bright classical or recurrent nova in outburst using the rapid response and multi-wavelength capabilities of Swift to obtain simultaneous gamma-ray, X-ray and ultraviolet (UV) observations. Swift provides unique insight into the novae phenomena during all the evolutionary phases, revealing many new and currently poorly understood events including phases of persistent hard X-rays as well as episodes of rapid and variable X-ray/UV emission. Swift ToO, supplemented with data from Fermi/LAT monitoring and our extant ground based optical/infrared (IR) and radio programs will grow the temporal and panchromatic archive of these events, requisite to glean the underlying physics of these new phenomena and novae evolution.

 

1013080 / DENNIS BODEWITS / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK)

"THE ACTIVITY AND EVOLUTION OF OORT CLOUD COMETS"

We propose to use Swift UVOT to characterize the activity of two dynamically new Oort Cloud comets, C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) and C/2012 K1 (Panstarrs). We will use the filters and UV grism on UVOT to quantitatively measure the gas and dust content in the coma at incremental heliocentric distances. Grism spectroscopy will allow us to simultaneously measure the production rates of water and several minor species. Broadband UVW1 and V-filter observations will allow for independent measures of the OH and dust content in the coma. Our systematic sampling of the comet s activity at different heliocentric distances will allow us to search for asymmetries around perihelion, which reflect the comet s evolution from a highly active new comet into more typical comet behavior.

 

1013084 / JEREMY S PERKINS / NASA/GSFC & UMBC

"FERMI-LAT INITIATED TOO'S FOR BRIGHT FLARING GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS"

In the Fermi/Swift era, the high gamma-ray flux alerts provided by the all-sky monitoring of the LAT give unique opportunities to study the optical to gamma-ray emission from blazars during such states. We propose to continue to obtain prompt Swift XRT/UVOT ToO observations of bright gamma-ray (>= 1E-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1; >100 MeV) flaring blazars detected by Fermi-LAT. At such high gamma-ray states, the LAT observes more than 20 such events per year, thus we request up to 20 Swift triggers of 2 x 5 ks each. The Swift and LAT observations will allow a broad-band characterization of each flaring blazar, providing constraints on models for the optical to gamma-ray emission.

 

1013086 / MARCO AJELLO / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"BL LAC OBJECTS AT THE HIGHEST REDSHIFTS"

For a long time high-redshift BL Lac objects were deemed not to exist. Fermi showed us that there is a relevant population of BL Lacs with redshift beyond 1.0. Some of them belong to the high-synchrotron peaked (HSP) class and are among the hardest gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi showing emission up and beyond 100 GeV. This makes them the most luminous BL Lacs ever detected and rates them among the most powerful accelerators in the Universe. We plan to observe 6 extreme BL Lacs simultaneously with GROND and Swift. This will provide unprecedented coverage of the synchrotron peak from IR to X-ray allowing us: to understand the nature and the energetic of these objects, to answer long-standing questions on the blazar sequence and to use them as probe of the extragalactic background light..

 

1013116 / STEVEN EDWARD BOGGS / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"TOO OBSERVATIONS OF GRBS DETECTED WITH THE NCT BALLOON PAYLOAD"

The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a wide-field, balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope (0.1-5 MeV) that will launch from Antarctica around December 1, 2014. The primary goal of this NCT flight is to perform pioneering measurements of gamma-ray polarization in GRBs to help probe the prompt emission mechanism and field geometry. On a ~50-day flight, we anticipate detecting around 8-10 GRBs and definitively measuring the polarization of ~4 GRBs. We are requesting Swift ToO observations of GRBs triggered by NCT with fluence levels high enough to permit measurement of the polarization. Swift observations will be crucial for enabling follow-up host galaxy and redshift determinations, as well as placing the polarization measurements in context of the afterglow properties.

 

1013119 / NATHALIE DEGENAAR / UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

"CONTINUING A SWIFT LEGACY: THE MONITORING CAMPAIGN OF THE GALACTIC CENTER"

The center of our Galaxy has been monitored every 1-4 days with the Swift/XRT since 2006. This has proven to be an excellent setup to capture X-ray flares from Sgr A* and to study the long-term behavior of 15 nearby X-ray binaries. In addition, the exciting discovery of a 3 Earth-mass gaseous object that is expected to interact with Sgr A* within the next year, provides the rare opportunity to closely follow a disruption event and the feeding process of the supermassive black hole. We have assembled a strong observational and theoretical research team, and secured complementary observing programs at different wavelengths. Here, we propose to continue our existing Swift/XRT monitoring program of the Galactic center in cycle 10 and request daily 1-ks observations that amount to 248 ks.

 

1013122 / JOHN A. TOMSICK / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"BLACK HOLE TRANSIENTS DURING OUTBURST DECAY"

An important step in improving our understanding of black hole (BH) jets is to determine the physics of BH systems in their hard state, which is the only BH state in which a steady and powerful jet is seen. We propose to use Swift to monitor a BH transient in the hard state during outburst decay. Swift will be used to follow the evolution of the flux and energy spectrum in order to: 1. Study correlations between X-rays and radio measurements made at ATCA; 2. Trigger an INTEGRAL observation to study possible non-thermal hard X-ray emission; and 3. Trigger a Suzaku observation to constrain the system geometry.

 

1013124 / JOHN A. TOMSICK / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"BLACK HOLE TRANSIENTS IN THE HARD STATE: CONSTRAINING THE SYSTEM GEOMETRY WITH NUSTAR AND SWIFT"

The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite enables high-quality hard X-ray measurements of accreting black hole (BH) systems at low luminosity. This is the first time that measurements of the entire Compton reflection component from the accretion disk will be possible at low mass accretion rates in the hard state. As this is the only state where steady jets are detected, NuSTAR and Swift can open a new window on the disk/jet connection by measuring the system geometry (and its evolution) while measuring the strength of the jet with radio observations. Swift/XRT monitoring is required to trigger NuSTAR and longer XRT observations (that are also part of this proposal) at these low flux levels.

 

1013125 / PETER A CURRAN / CURTIN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

"EXTREMELY BROADBAND MONITORING OBSERVATIONS OF LMXBS"

We request ToO observations to monitor a black hole low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) throughout its outburst. Most studies of the evolution of LMXB outbursts have, because of a lack of contemporaneous data, been limited to only a few wavelength ranges; only recently has the evolution of the broadband spectrum (radio optical X-ray), as we herein propose, been studied in detail. We will take advantage of our ongoing programs on ground-based robotic optical and radio telescopes to obtain unique, contemporaneous observations over an extremely broad range (10 decades) of energies at frequent, regular epochs. This will allow the evolution of the emission regions of the source to be traced, at a resolution of days, for the full period of the outburst and through its different states.

 

1013129 / TAKANORI SAKAMOTO / AOYAMA GAKUIN UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT RAPID FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF MAXI XRFS"

We propose a Swift ToO program to observe XRFs detected by MAXI to identify an afterglow with the Swift NFI instruments. Our proposed "faster and better" GRB position from MAXI should enhance the afterglow detection of XRFs. Furthermore, our program should also increase the number of redshift measurements of XRFs. We request a maximum of 4 ToOs (2 XRFs) for 8 ks in total as the initial 4 tiling-mode observation, and for 4 ks as the 2nd follow-up observation to confirm the decay nature of an afterglow candidate.

 

1013136 / RYAN FOLEY / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

"UV SPECTROSCOPY/PHOTOMETRY OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE"

Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are incredibly useful distance indicators. However, we still do not know exactly what progenitors create SN Ia or how they explode. We have an approved HST program to obtain ultraviolet (UV) spectral time series of multiple nearby SN Ia. The UV portion of a SN Ia spectral energy distribution is strongly affected by progenitor composition and the nuclear burning during the explosion. We propose to take advantage of Swift's fast turn-around capabilities to obtain UV spectra immediately after discovery (before HST can be scheduled). We also propose to obtain UVOT light curves of these well-observed SN. The combination of Swift, HST, and ground-based data will further our understanding of SN Ia progenitor systems and explosions and improve SN Ia distance estimates.

 

1013140 / RYAN CHORNOCK / HARVARD-SMITHSONIAN CENTER FOR ASTROPHYSICS

"RAPID OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF SWIFT GRBS: COSMIC REIONIZATION, METAL ENRICHMENT, AND HIGH-Z HOSTS"

The use of GRB afterglows as probes of the high redshift universe has flourished thanks to rapid and accurate positions from Swift. Our group uses some of the world's largest telescopes to rapidly obtain spectroscopic observations of Swift bursts. These observations provide redshifts, a crucial quantity for any subsequent analysis (e.g. energetics, broadband modeling). Equally important, they probe the chemical composition ofhigh redshift galaxies, providing information that is inaccessible with either quasars or traditional galaxy surveys. Similarly, we continueto aggressively pursue searches and studies of GRBs at z>6 to trace the process of re-ionization and to pinpoint high redshift galaxies. Finally, we continue to pursue absorption redshifts for short GRBs.

           

1013143 / OLIVIER GODET / INSTITUT DE RECHERCHE EN ASTROPHYSIQUE & PLANETOLOGIE

"X-RAY MONITORING OF THE BEST INTERMEDIATE MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE HLX-1 IN ESO 243-49"

We request a series of 26x3 ks snapshots of the intermediate mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1, to be taken every 10-14 days from 2014-04-01 to 2015-03-01. These data will be essential to understand how the accretion onto the black hole evolves with time and will also serve to trigger proposed VLT, Gemini and ATCA observations. The Swift and multi-wavelength data will enable us to test whether the companion is still transferring mass onto the black hole and to determine the nature of the radio emission observed in the low/hard state. Understanding how intermediate mass black holes are fed and accrete is essential for trying to identify other good candidates for this small and poorly understood population, that are thought to be the building blocks of supermassive black holes.

 

1013144 / ABE D FALCONE / PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"THE LARGEST FLARES FROM KNOWN TEV GAMMA RAY BLAZARS: SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS WITH TOOS"

We propose to study known TeV blazars, most of which have never previously benefited from multiwavelength campaigns, during their highest flaring states. These proposed simultaneous multiwavelength observations will place severe constraints on the emission models. Simultaneous observations of X-ray, UV/optical, and gamma-ray emission during high states from these sources will provide the means to study relative flux, time delays, and the SED, thus enabling studies of particle acceleration and emission processes in blazar jets. Since the 1st peak of these SEDs is typically in the X-ray band and the 2nd peak is in the GeV/TeV band, Swift, VERITAS, and Fermi are ideal for these studies. The high flaring states required by the trigger criteria will ensure high science return.

 

1013145 / CHRISTOPHER STEPHEN REYNOLDS / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK)

"OPTICAL/UV/X-RAY VARIABILITY OF THE BARE AGN FAIRALL 9"

Fairall 9 (F9) is a luminous active galactic nucleus that has never shown signs of X-ray absorption or optical/UV extinction - we appear to have a clean view of the inner accretion disk around the supermassive black hole. Building upon a pilot program, we propose SWIFT-optical/UV/X-ray monitoring of F9 with 100 visits (each 1ks) spaced 2 days apart. We will (i) examine the relationship between the optical/UV/X-rays, including frequency-dependent timelags, to probe the accretion physics, (ii) search for UV/soft-X correlations and relate these to the physics of the soft X-ray excess, (iii) examine the nature of the curious X-ray dips discovered in RXTE monitoring, distinguishing absorption models from a disk-disruption scenario, (iv) inform a proposed joint XMM/NuSTAR observation of F9.

 

1013149 / FILIPPO D'AMMANDO / ISTITUTO DI RADIOASTRONOMIA

"SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OF A GAMMA-RAY FLARING RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1"

The detection by Fermi-LAT of gamma-ray emission from 5 radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 revealed the presence of an emerging third class of gamma-ray emitting AGN. With this proposal we would like to perform a ToO follow-up with Swift of the first flaring (F >7e-7 ph/cm^2/s for E>100 MeV) NLSy1 detected by Fermi-LAT during this AO-10. We request 1 Swift trigger of 5x10ks observations throughout 3 weeks. This monitoring campaign will allow us to study the source variability in optical, UV and X-rays on different time scales from weeks to days and shorter. The simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations will allow the modeling of the SED from optical to gamma rays, providing constraints on the emission mechanisms and investigating the differences with respect to blazars and radio galaxies..

 

1013150 / MARIO GLIOZZI / GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY

"SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE CENTRAL ENGINE IN AGN: SWIFT MONITORING OF THE BARE AGN ARK 120"

We propose to monitor for 6 months the prototypical "bare" AGN Ark 120 with the UVOT and XRT. A simultaneous study of UV, optical, and X-ray variability in AGN is one of the most effective tools to shed light on their central engine. The selected target is ideal to investigate correlated flux variation in different energy bands because: 1) it is a bright "clean" system without warm absorbers or jets, 2) it is highly variable on all time scales over the entire spectrum, 3) its large BH mass coupled with low accretion rate offers the ideal conditions to produce a tight X-ray/optical correlation. The proposed study will provide crucial information on the origin of variability and the interplay between disk and corona in AGN.

 

1013160 / JIAN GE / UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

"HUNTING HIGH-Z GRBS WITH THE FIRST NEAR-IR IFU SPECTROGRAPH ON A 2M ROBOTIC TELESCOPE"

We propose to develop a Near-IR (NIR, 0.8-1.8 um) fiber bundle Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectroscopy mode in the FIRST near IR (NIR) high resolution spectrograph and associated data pipeline for capturing medium-resolution Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) NIR spectra within 5 minutes of the trigger release by Swift using the Tennessee State University 2m robotic telescope, AST, at Fairborn Observatory in Arizona. The broad NIR wavelength coverage (from I band to H band) will allow the prompt identification of GRBs in the z=5.5-13.5 redshift range and the acquisition of high signal-to-noise afterglow spectra. Using such high quality data we will be able to investigate the chemical content (e.g. neutral hydrogen, metal enrichment) of the first generation of galaxies during the re-ionization epoch.

 

1013163 / ROOPESH OJHA / NASA/GSFC & CRESST

"INVESTIGATING THE ANOMALOUS BEHAVIOR OF EXTREME BLAZARS"

We propose to add Swift XRT and UVOT observations to our ongoing multi-wavelength monitoring campaign of the extreme blazar PKS1424-418. This source has been extraordinarily active in the Fermi gamma-ray band for the last year, reaching a peak flux ~2 orders of magnitude times its quiescent level. Our campaign includes optical/NIR and 4-frequency-band radio support. Goals are to establish the empirical characteristics of individual light curve structures, but beyond that to apply methodologies that tie empirical flare characteristics to physical parameters. The XRT band is critical to these analyses and is often the missing observational component. We request 25 individual 5-ksec observations at a ~1-week cadence with a shift to higher cadence in the event of extreme activity.

           

1013170 / NICHOLAS B SUNTZEFF / TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERLUMINOUS AND 2002CX-LIKE TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE"

We propose to observe one superluminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) and one 2002cx-like SN with the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) to gather early-epoch UV spectra and absolute magnitude light curves. At early epochs UVOT photometry has shown that both target SNe subclasses are UV bright and blue, making them good targets for study with this instrument. These observations, when combined with archival UVOT and Carnegie Supernova Project data, will complement a comprehensive set of UVOIR observations that document the spectral evolution from early to post-maximum light epochs of the major subclasses of SNe. We will compute integrated bolometric lightcurves from the UVOIR spectra and perform the first internally consistent comparison of differing SNe Ia subclasses.

 

1013194 / MICHAEL FRANCIS CORCORAN / NASA/GSFC & USRA

"X-RAY MONITORING OF EC"

Eta Car is the nearest supermassive star, a notoriously eruptive variable. X-ray variations show that Eta Car is also a massive, long-period, extremely eccentric (e~0.9) colliding wind binary in which variable 2-10 keV X-ray emission is produced along the wind-wind shock. Monitoring of the 2-10 keV band over the last 17 years has played a key role in constraining the mass loss from the LBV primary and (unseen, massive) companion star, but also show poorly understood secular changes in the lightcurve, most notably a dramatic early recovery from the last X-ray minimum in 2009. We request monitoring observations with Swift to measure the current state of the system through the next X-ray minimum (July 2014) to test models of large-scale changes in the mass-loss rate.

 

1013198 / EDMUND HODGES-KLUCK / UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

"MAPPING ULTRAVIOLET HALOS IN A MINI-SURVEY OF NEARBY STARBURST GALAXIES"

We have developed a new method to detect gas in galaxy halos via dust-scattered UV emission around highly inclined galaxies. We can measure the dust column and metallicity as a function of position around the galaxy from the UV luminosity and fitting dust models to the UV SED. This complements quasar absorption studies, which cannot map single galaxies. We request Swift observations of four starburst galaxies where we have already detected UV halos to make high fidelity maps to constrain the mass and location of cosmic infall and stellar feedback, whose signatures are strongest around such galaxies in an emerging picture of inflow/outflow we aim to test.

 

1013203 / MARIANNE VESTERGAARD / UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

"THE IMPACT OF THE IONIZING SED AND SOURCE INCLINATION ON QUASAR BLACK HOLE MASS MEASUREMENTS"

By combining new Swift observations with existing radio imaging and high-quality restframe UV-optical VLT spectra we will map and study how the ionizing spectral energy distribution and the source inclination affect the shape of the Hbeta, MgII, and CIV broad emission lines and thereby the black hole mass estimates in distant quasars. This study will simultaneously test recently proposed hypotheses of what determines the shape of broad emission lines. We will seek to establish a simple corrective measure that can improve the mass estimates. We ask for 101ks for 10 quasars as a proof of concept.

 

1013204 / FREDERICK M WALTER / STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT STONY BROOK

"SSS TURN-ON AND TURN-OFF TIMES OF CLASSICAL NOVAE"

Classical novae are responsible for enriching the Galaxy with low z elements, form one of the pathways to the type Ia supernovae, and are a transient source of high energy gamma-rays. Swift observations of classical novae have revealed new phenomena and provided new insights into the basic paradigm of how white dwarfs (WD) explode. With extensive multi-wavelength monitoring supporting the XRT observations of the hot nuclear-burning surface of the WD, we are subjecting the detailed physics of the nova phenomenon to unprecedented scrutiny. We request 95 ksec to begin or extend the time sampling of 19 recent novae. This will aid us in our goal of bounding the turn-on and turn-off times, and the duration of the supersoft source phase, for a large sample of well-characterized novae.

 

1013205 / MATHEW JAMES PAGE / MULLARD SPACE SCIENCE LABORATORY

"DECOUPLING LUMINOSITY AND EVOLUTION IN THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF AGN"

With this proposal we will construct a comprehensive library of X-ray to submillimetre radio-loud quasar spectral energy distributions for a single epoch (z=1), which is precisely matched to a companion sample of radio quiet quasars. In doing so, we will decouple luminosity effects from evolutionary effects and so determine the amount of radiation that is absorbed and reprocessed by the torus, and how this depends on the presence or otherwise, of a radio jet. The SED library will represent a fundamental resource to reconcile the conflicting results on AGN obscuration at different wavelengths, and for future investigations of the accretion history of massive black holes. Here we request Swift observations to provide the UV and X-ray parts of the SED library.

 

1013211 / MISSAGH MEHDIPOUR / UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON

"CONTINUED SWIFT MONITORING OF NGC 5548"

From a recent multi-wavelength campaign on Seyfert-1 galaxy NGC 5548, we have discovered this AGN to be in a very unusual condition with heavily-suppressed flux levels. Our Swift, XMM-Newton and HST/COS observations during 2013 show that the soft X-rays are suppressed by as much as a factor of 30, whilst the UV absorption lines are stronger and broader than ever observed before. Our results indicate this is due to obscuration by new heavily-absorbing ionised material. The origin and properties of this new material and its relation to the traditional warm absorbers are unknown. The proposed Swift monitoring of NGC 5548 would make it possible to study the cause of this rarely-seen behaviour in AGN, which has important implications on our understanding of ionised outflows in AGN.

 

1013218 / ANDREI BELOBORODOV / COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

"EARLY AFTERGLOW EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS"

We propose to develop a new model for optical flashes and afterglow of GRBs, which is expected from the external blast wave of the explosion. We will use a new proxy for the external medium density -- the GeV flash, which was detected in 36 GRBs. We recently proposed a model explaining the observed GeV light curve, which provides evidence that GRBs explode in winds from their progenitors. The GeV data analysis allows us to determine the wind density without involving uncertain parameters of the shock. Using the measured density, we will investigate possible synchrotron emission from the blast wave, compare it with data, and derive constraints on the magnetic field and the electron acceleration in the forward shock. We will also investigate the possible contribution of the reverse shock.

 

1013224 / JOHN A. TOMSICK / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"UNDERSTANDING THE HARD X-RAY COMPONENT FROM NEUTRON STAR TRANSIENTS"

At low luminosities, the X-ray spectra of neutron star (NS) LMXB transients often contain two components: one is due to thermal emission from the NS surface and is reasonably well-understood, while the other is a hard power-law of unknown origin. By observing Cen X-4 in quiescence, NuSTAR has given us our first look at the hard component above 10 keV, and we see a sharp cutoff that is consistent with a bremsstrahlung emission mechanism. After Cen X-4, the next brightest system that would provide a comparison to Cen X-4 is Aql X-1, but the source is often too faint for NuSTAR. Thus, we propose to monitor Aql X-1 during the decay of its next outburst in order to trigger deep observations with NuSTAR and XMM-Newton near quiescence.

 

1013225 / ARASH BODAGHEE / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"SWIFT TOO OBSERVATIONS OF HARD X-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM THE INNER GALAXY"

"Swift ToO observations are proposed for up to 10 new hard X-ray transients discovered during the course of our approved INTEGRAL programs to regularly monitor the Inner Galaxy. This region is teeming with transient X-ray sources such as high-mass and low-mass X-ray binaries (including microquasars and bursters), and magnetars. INTEGRAL will devote 4.2 Ms of observing time to the these fields in the next year, enabling the discovery of new X-ray sources which will then trigger these Swift observations giving us a precise X-ray position and a quality spectrum in a broad energy band (0.5 100 keV). The rapid reaction time of Swift is a key ingredient in successfully establishing the fundamental properties of a new X-ray source before it returns to quiescence.

 

1013229 / MANSI KASLIWAL / CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON

"UNDERSTANDING YOUNG SUPERNOVAE AND EXOTIC TRANSIENTS WITH SWIFT AND IPTF"

The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) operations are now in full swing with a focus on faster cadence and even more rapid response follow-up of optical transients. Our new software pipeline, building on the PTF legacy, regulary issues automated alerts for intra-night spectroscopic follow-up of extremely young supernovae. Here, we propose to continue our very productive Swift-iPTF program focused on young supernovae and fast evolving transients. The proposed Swift-iPTF program will be complemented with an aggressive multi-wavelength (Palomar, Magellan, Keck, APO and EVLA) program.

 

1013235 / TIM MCMAHON / LANGSTON UNIVERSITY

"MULTIFOLD S/N AMPLITUDE IMPROVEMENT AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF GRB AND NON-GRB POINT SOURCES IN SWIFT'S BAT SURVEY"

We have demonstrated an algorithm for improving the image reconstruction of point sources in the BAT Survey archive for signal amplitude and energy distributions. These improvements have the potential to increase the scientific return on a variety of GRB and non-GRB related investigations of low flux detections of undetected distant or nearby GRB, transient or tidal disruption events.

 

1013244 / JASON CURTIS / PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"UV OBSERVATIONS OF THE OLDEST NEARBY STAR CLUSTER RUPRECHT 147"

At a distance of 300 pc and an age of 3 Gyr, Ruprecht 147 is the oldest nearby open cluster, making it a unique and critical laboratory for studying stellar astrophysics and stellar populations. R147 has a massive legacy of photometric, spectroscopic and astrometric observations. We now propose to extend this database to the high-energy regime with a fill-in survey of the inner 30' of the cluster with Swift/UVOT and XRT. The UVOT data will enable us to identify hot isolated and binary white dwarfs, allowing us to measure a main sequence turnoff independent age. The WDs will also have uniform age and metallicity that can be studied more intensively from the ground to address many questions in white dwarf astrophysics, especially the low-mass end of the initial-final mass relation.

 

1013248 / ALESSANDRA CORSI / GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

"UNRAVELING THE MISSING LINK BETWEEN 1998BW-LIKE SNE AND GRBS"

The progress in our understanding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) has been quite spectacular. We now know that these events are the most relativistic explosions, likely arising from a collapsing compact object (long GRBs). However, it is still a mystery what makes some small fraction of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) produce the relativistic ejecta that powers a GRB. Our proposal aims at clarifying the GRB-SN connection, via follow-up observations of broad-line (BL) Ic SNe detected by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), using Swift and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). This proposal is linked to our approved 2012/2013 VLA program (that we will continue renewing - PI: A. Corsi), and is aimed at complementing our study with data of fundamental importance from Swift.

 

1013263 / THOMAS NELSON / UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

"SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE EARLIEST X-RAY EMISSION IN NOVAE"

We propose to continue our Swift survey of the earliest X-ray emission observed in nova outbursts. The program aims to explore how mass loss proceeds during nova outbursts using contemporaneous X-ray and radio observations of up to two novae during the first 12 weeks after discovery. The requested X-ray light curves will be augmented by radio light curves obtained using the Very Large Array through a pre-approved program. Understanding how mass is ejected in nova outbursts is crucial for determining the long term evolution of the white dwarfs in these systems.

 

1013264 / DEEPTO CHAKRABARTY / MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

"STUDYING THE ONSET OF PROPELLER ACCRETION IN SAX J1808.4-3658 WITH NUSTAR AND SWIFT"

We propose a joint program with NuSTAR and Swift to monitor the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 during its return to quiescence at the end of an outburst. The goal of this campaign is to measure the hard X-ray spectrum and to detect pulsations from the source in the tail of the outburst. This will probe the role of the magnetosphere in the "propeller" accretion regime and will explore whether magnetically channeled accretion still occurs there. The flexible monitoring capability of Swift will be used to trigger high-sensitivity NuSTAR hard X-ray observations at the appropriate flux level during the decay of a transient outburst. Based on the previous outburst history of SAX J1808.4-3658, we estimate a high likelihood that the source will outburst again during Swift Cycle 10.

 

1013267 / JASON EDWARD YOUNG / PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"ANCHORING THE BLUE END OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS DISK GALAXY SEDS"

We request fill-in observations of nine low surface brightness gas-rich disk galaxies using the Swift UVOT instrument. The observations do not need to be contiguous in time and, although bluer filters are preferable, any 'filter of the day' is acceptable for our program. These observations will be used along with optical integral field unit spectra and archival Spitzer IRAC images to determine the star-formation histories of these galaxies via spectral energy distribution fitting. Using these observations, we can address several outstanding debates about star formation in low surface brightness galaxies.

 

1013275 / AMY Y LIEN / NASA/GSFC & UMBC

"CHASING SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH SWIFT AND FERMI"

Our knowledge about the nature of short GRBs remains limited and difficult to advance, mainly due to the low rate of well-localized events. Previous studies found that Swift detects fewer short bursts than other instruments, either because of instrumental bias, or there might exist some confusion in the burst classifications. We propose to utilize a code we recently developed that simulates the complex trigger algorithm of Swift/BAT, along with the rich Fermi/GBM data of short bursts, to investigate possible instrumental effects and perform the first systematic study of causes for the missing bursts in Swift's detections. Moreover, we will search for possible automated methods to increase Swift's detection rate of short bursts and apply it to the data stream of Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM.

 

1013288 / PETE ROMING / SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE

"USING THE UV LEVER ARM TO PROBE TYPE IIN SUPERNOVAE SHELLS"

Type IIn SNe (IIn) are intrinsically bright, with a substantial fraction of the bolometric luminosity contained in the UV. As such, they are candidates for probes of star formation out to high-z; however, their UV properties are poorly understood. Only recently has the sample size of well-observed UV IIn become available. Using this new sample, and the fact that the UV brightness provides an excellent lever arm for quantifying differences in absorption columns and metallicity, we are positioned to determine key parameters of the ejected shell. We propose to create a grid of IIn shell models by varying four shell parameters: mass, thickness, metallicity, and mass loss. These models will be compared with the recent sample of IIn, obtained with UVOT,in order to constrain the shell parameters.