The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Italian site U.K. site

Swift Cycle 13 Results

The lists below contain the proposals recommended by the Cycle 13 Peer Review panel. Note that in addition to the accepted programs below, ToO requests for exceptional transients will continue to be possible through the Swift ToO web site, even for ToOs not accepted into the GI Program. The decision on whether or not to observe a ToO of either category will be made by the Swift Principal Investigator.

PIs of Cycle 13 proposals for observation: Please note that the ROSES 2016 Appendix D.5 "Swift Guest Investigator Cycle 13" states:

"It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator (PI) of an accepted ToO to alert the Swift Observatory Duty Scientist when trigger conditions for their accepted ToO have been met. This is done through the Swift ToO Request Form at https://www.swift.psu.edu/secure/toop/request.php. It is highly recommended that ToO proposers register as Swift ToO users in advance at https://www.swift.psu.edu/secure/toop/too_newuser.php. Registration is required in order to submit a ToO Request."

"ToO proposals must have an astrophysical trigger. Once the trigger criteria have been met for an approved target, the PI should check if the target location is more than five hours in RA from the Sun and more than 20 degrees from the Moon before requesting Swift observations (http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Tools/Viewing.html)."

"Accepted Cycle 13 ToO proposals may be triggered until March 31, 2018."

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Recommended Proposals

Prop    PI              	Title

Key Projects: 
1316130 MACCARONE, THOMAS	THE SWIFT GALACTIC BULGE MONITORING SURVEY
1316154 EDELSON, RICK           THE SWIFT AGN ACCRETION DISK REVERBERATION MAPPING PROGRAM: MARKARIAN 509
1316209 KOUVELIOTOU, CHRYSSA    TOWARDS A POPULATION CENSUS OF YOUNG GALACTIC X-RAY SOURCES
1316229 MCHARDY, IAN            SWIFT, HST, ASTROSAT AND GROUND BASED REVERBERATION MAPPING OF MKN110: WHAT DRIVES UV/OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN AGN?

High-z correlative observations: 
1316139 GE, JIAN                HUNTING HIGH-Z GRBS WITH THE FIRST NEAR-IR IFU SPECTROGRAPH ON A 2M ROBOTIC TELESCOPE

Regular proposals: 
1316004 BERGER, EDO             UNIQUE INSIGHTS INTO SWIFT GRBS WITH THE VLA AND ALMA
1316007 GRUPE, DIRK		LONG-TERM VARIABILITY OF THE SEDS OF AGN
1316009 KENNEA, JAMIE		FINAL YEAR: SWIFT LOCALIZATION OF MAXI DISCOVERED GALACTIC X-RAY TRANSIENTS
1316017 GODET, OLIVIER		INVESTIGATING THE INCREASE IN THE OUTBURST RECURRENCE TIME FOR THE INTERMEDIATE MASS BLACK HOLE HLX-1 IN ESO 243-49
1316035 MARSHALL, FRANCIS	KEEPING CLOSE TRACK OF THE MOST LUMINOUS GAMMA-RAY PULSAR
1316063 MARGUTTI, RAFFAELLA	DETAILED MAPPING OF EXTREME MASS-LOSS FROM EVOLVED MASSIVE STARS WITH SWIFT
1316064 CORSI, ALESSANDRA       RADIO-TO-X-RAY FOLLOW-UP OF ADVANCED LIGO TRIGGERS
1316076 DEGENAAR, NATHALIE      UNDERSTANDING THE CRUSTS OF TRANSIENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS
1316082 LIEN, AMY               QUANTIFYING THE INSTRUMENTAL EFFECTS AND SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE DURATIONS OF SWIFT/BAT GAMMA-RAY BURST
1316084 BOGDANOV, SLAVKO	OBSERVING THE NEXT X-RAY BINARY-RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR TRANSITION
1316085 NARDINI, EMANUELE	COUPLING ACCRETION DISK, X-RAY CORONA AND SMBH WIND IN THE LUMINOUS QUASAR PDS 456
1316099 CAPPELLUTI, NICO	UNBIASED CLUSTERING MEASURE OF LOCAL AGN WITH SWIFT-BAT
1316104 HENZE, MARTIN           PROBING THE ERUPTION STATISTICS AND EVOLUTION OF THE UNIQUE RECURRENT NOVA M31N 2008-12A
1316106 HOLDER, JAMIE           IDENTIFYING TEV J2032+4130 AND DISCOVERING A NEW TEV BINARY SYSTEM WITH SWIFT AND VERITAS.
1316116 LONGSTAFF, EMMA		NLTT 5306: ACCRETING FROM A SUB-STELLAR DEGENERATE OBJECT
1316117 CHERNYAKOVA, MARIA	X-RAY MONITORING OF PSR J2032+4127 MOVING TOWARDS PERIASTRON
1316119 PRITCHARD, TYLER        DEEPER, WIDER, FASTER: HIGH ENERGY COUNTERPARTS TO THE FASTEST BURSTS IN THE SKY
1316125 BODEWITS, DENNIS	ROTATION AND CHEMICAL HETEROGENEITY OF COMET 41P/TUTTLE-GIACOBINI-KRESAK
1316128 SORIA, ROBERTO          TESTING A PRECESSION MODEL FOR THE NEUTRON STAR ULX P13
1316134 DEGENAAR, NATHALIE	THE NATURE AND ACCRETION FLOW PROPERTIES OF SUB-LUMINOUS X-RAY BINARIES
1316135 WARGELIN, BRADFORD	PROXIMA CENTAURI'S STELLAR CYCLE
1316144 NEILL, JAMES            ROBOTIC SPECTROSCOPIC FOLLOWUP OF SWIFT GRBS
1316152 BUTLER, NATHANIEL	GRB AND GRAVITATIONAL WAVE FOLLOWUP WITH RATIR AND THE DDOTI
1316155 MEHDIPOUR, MISSAGH	CONTINUING THE SEARCH FOR X-RAY OBSCURING DISK WINDS IN AGN
1316157 KASLIWAL, MANSI         UNDERSTANDING YOUNG SUPERNOVAE & EXOTIC TRANSIENTS WITH SWIFT AND ZTF 
1316173 HAIMAN, ZOLTAN		TESTING THE ORIGIN OF PERIODICITY FOR THE BINARY CANDIDATE QUASAR PG1302-102
1316180 KAUR, AMANPREET		HUNTING HIGH REDSHIFT BLAZARS WITH SWIFT AND SARA-CT
1316181 BROWN, PETER            TEMPLATE OBSERVATIONS TO COMPLETE SWIFT SUPERNOVAE
1316192 ARCAVI, IAIR		TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS - A WINDOW TO QUIESCENT SUPER-MASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND ACCRETION PHYSICS
1316198 HARRISON, FIONA		SWIFT MONITORING OF NEUTRON STAR POWERED ULTRA-LUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES
1316208 VESTERGAARD, MARIANNE   EFFECTS OF THE QUASAR SED ON BLACK HOLE MASS AND DISK WINDS
1316216 MARSCHER, ALAN          RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN X-RAY FLARES AND OPTICAL POLARIZATION SPECTRA OF BLAZARS
1316225 HOMAN, JEROEN           SWIFT COVERAGE OF A FULL STATE-TRANSITION CYCLE IN 4U 1636-536
1316232 HUGHES, JOHN		X-RAY CONFIRMATION OF CANDIDATE PLANCK CLUSTERS WITH SWIFT

Recommended Targets

Definition of Columns

  1. Proposal: Proposal number assigned by Swift mission
  2. PI: Principal Investigator's last name
  3. Target_Num: Target number as listed on the proposal form
  4. Target_Name: Target name as listed on proposal forms
  5. RA: Right Ascension (equinox J2000) in degrees
  6. Dec: Declination (equinox J2000) in degrees
  7. Time: Total observing time approved, in ksec
  8. ToO: "Y" if Target of Opportunity proposal, otherwise "N"

Prop   |PI              |Target_Num|Target_Name         |Time [ ks ] |TOO|RA [ deg ]|Dec [ deg ]|
1316130|MACCARONE       |  1       |SBS1                |  13.40     |N  |266.6879  |-30.8413   |
1316130|MACCARONE       |  2       |SBS4                |  13.40     |N  |265.9255  |-29.6182   |
1316130|MACCARONE       |  3       |SBS5                |  13.40     |N  |266.8782  |-28.2525   |
1316130|MACCARONE       |  4       |SBS6                |  13.40     |N  |264.3286  |-29.5751   |
1316130|MACCARONE       |  5       |SBS7                |  13.40     |N  |265.2417  |-28.3059   |
1316130|MACCARONE       |  6       |SBS8                |  13.40     |N  |266.1323  |-27.0305   |
1316154|EDELSON         |  1       |MRK 509             | 239.00     |N  |311.0407  |-10.7234   |
1316209|KOUVELIOTOU	|  183	   |GALACTIC PLANE	|1785.00     |N  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316229|MCHARDY         |  1       |MKN 110             | 270.00     |N  |141.3036  | 52.2863   |
1316007|GRUPE           |  1       |MKN 1501            |   1.00     |N  |  2.6292  | 10.9750   |
1316007|GRUPE           |  2       |ESO 242-G8          |   1.00     |N  |  6.2508  |-45.4928   |
1316007|GRUPE           |  3       |RX J0040.9-0742     |   1.00     |N  | 10.2208  | -7.7028   |
1316007|GRUPE           |  4       |TON S 180           |   1.00     |N  | 14.3342  |-22.3825   |
1316007|GRUPE           |  5       |MKN 1148            |   1.00     |N  | 12.9792  | 17.4331   |
1316007|GRUPE           |  6       |RX J0052.6-1822     |   1.00     |N  | 13.2292  |-18.3753   |
1316007|GRUPE           |  7       |QSO 0056-36         |   1.00     |N  | 14.6558  |-36.1014   |
1316007|GRUPE           |  8       |RX J0100.4-5113     |   1.00     |N  | 15.1129  |-51.2317   |
1316007|GRUPE           |  9       |RX J0105.6-1416     |   1.00     |N  | 16.4104  |-14.2706   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 10       |MKN 1152            |   1.00     |N  | 18.4583  |-14.8456   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 11       |RX J0117-3826       |   1.00     |N  | 19.3775  |-38.4417   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 12       |MS 0117-28          |   1.00     |N  | 19.8987  |-28.3589   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 13       |RX J0128.1-1848     |   1.00     |N  | 22.0279  |-28.3589   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 14       |IRASF 01267-217     |   1.00     |N  | 22.2946  |-21.6992   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 15       |RX J0134.2-4258     |   1.00     |N  | 23.5704  |-42.9742   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 16       |RX J0136.9-3510     |   1.00     |N  | 24.2221  |-35.1681   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 17       |RX J0148.3-2758     |   1.00     |N  | 27.0929  |-27.9739   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 18       |RX J0152.4-2319     |   1.00     |N  | 28.1129  |-23.3317   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 19       |MKN 1044            |   1.00     |N  | 37.5229  | -8.9981   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 20       |MKN 1048            |   1.00     |N  | 38.6575  | -8.7878   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 21       |RX J0238.8-4038     |   1.00     |N  | 39.7042  |-40.6442   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 22       |RX J0311.3-2046     |   1.00     |N  | 47.8283  |-20.7719   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 23       |RX J0319.8-2627     |   1.00     |N  | 49.9529  |-26.4533   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 24       |RX J0323.2-4931     |   1.00     |N  | 50.8158  |-49.5197   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 25       |ESO 301-G13         |   1.00     |N  | 51.2592  |-41.9050   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 26       |VCV 0331-37         |   1.00     |N  | 53.4175  |-41.9050   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 27       |RX J0347.0-3023     |   1.00     |N  | 56.7708  |-30.3978   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 28       |RX J0349.1-4711     |   1.00     |N  | 57.2821  |-47.1844   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 29       |FAIRALL 1116        |   1.00     |N  | 57.9237  |-40.4667   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 30       |FAIRALL 1119        |   1.00     |N  | 61.2571  |-37.1875   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 31       |RX J0412.7-4712     |   1.00     |N  | 63.1729  |-47.2128   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 32       |H 0419-577          |   1.00     |N  | 66.5029  |-57.2006   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 33       |FAIRALL 303         |   1.00     |N  | 67.6667  |-53.6156   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 34       |MKN 618             |   1.00     |N  | 69.0917  |-10.3761   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 35       |RX J0437.4-4711     |   1.00     |N  | 69.3675  |-47.1917   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 36       |RX J0437.4-5311     |   1.00     |N  | 69.4112  |-53.1919   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 37       |H 0439-272          |   1.00     |N  | 70.3438  |-27.1389   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 38       |1E 0614-584         |   1.00     |N  | 93.9567  |-58.4350   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 39       |RX J0751.0+0320     |   1.00     |N  |117.7500  |  3.3447   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 40       |QSO 0833+4426       |   1.00     |N  |128.4958  | 44.4339   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 41       |RX J0859+4846       |   1.00     |N  |134.7621  | 48.7692   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 42       |RX J0902.5-0700     |   1.00     |N  |135.6400  | -7.0011   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 43       |MKN 110             |   1.00     |N  |141.3042  | 52.2867   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 44       |PG 0953+414         |   1.00     |N  |148.4683  | 41.2561   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 45       |RX J1005.7+4332     |   1.00     |N  |151.4246  | 43.5447   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 46       |RX J1007.1+2203     |   1.00     |N  |151.7925  | 22.0506   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 47       |CBS 126             |   1.00     |N  |288.2633  | 35.8567   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 48       |HS 1019+37          |   1.00     |N  |154.7521  | 37.8781   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 49       |MKN 141             |   1.00     |N  |154.8025  | 63.9676   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 50       |MKN 142             |   1.00     |N  |156.3804  | 51.6764   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 51       |RX J1034.6+3938     |   1.00     |N  |158.6608  | 39.6411   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 52       |RX J1117+6522       |   1.00     |N  |169.2921  | 65.3686   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 53       |PG 1115+407         |   1.00     |N  |169.6267  | 40.4319   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 54       |TON 1388            |   1.00     |N  |169.7862  | 21.3217   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 55       |EXO 1128+69         |   1.00     |N  |172.7700  | 68.8647   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 56       |B2 1128+31          |   1.00     |N  |172.7896  | 31.2350   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 57       |RX J1134.3+0411     |   1.00     |N  |173.5958  |  4.1911   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 58       |SBS 1136+579        |   1.00     |N  |174.7067  | 57.7122   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 59       |Z 1136+3412         |   1.00     |N  |174.8079  | 33.9308   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 60       |WAS 26              |   1.00     |N  |175.3175  | 21.9392   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 61       |CASG 855            |   1.00     |N  |176.1246  | 36.8858   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 62       |PG 1149-110         |   1.00     |N  |178.0167  |-11.3733   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 63       |MKN 1310            |   1.00     |N  |180.3100  | -3.6781   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 64       |NGC 4051            |   1.00     |N  |180.7896  | 44.5306   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 65       |GQ COM              |   1.00     |N  |181.1754  | 27.9033   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 66       |RX J1209.8+3217     |   1.00     |N  |182.4408  | 32.2839   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 67       |PG 1211+143         |   1.00     |N  |182.8237  | 14.0536   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 68       |MKN 766             |   1.00     |N  |184.6108  | 29.8128   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 69       |3C 273              |   1.00     |N  |187.2779  |  2.0525   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 70       |RX J1231.6+7044     |   1.00     |N  |187.9025  | 70.7372   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 71       |MKN 771             |   1.00     |N  |188.0125  | 20.1583   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 72       |TON 83              |   1.00     |N  |188.4238  | 31.0175   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 73       |MCG+08-23-067       |   1.00     |N  |189.2133  | 45.6514   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 74       |NGC 4593            |   1.00     |N  |189.9142  | -5.3442   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 75       |IRAS 12397+3333     |   1.00     |N  |190.5442  | 33.2842   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 76       |PG 1244+026         |   1.00     |N  |191.6458  |  2.3689   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 77       |RX J1304.2+0205     |   1.00     |N  |196.0708  |  2.0936   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 78       |PG 1307+085         |   1.00     |N  |196.0708  |  2.0936   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 79       |RX J1314.3+3429     |   1.00     |N  |198.5946  | 34.4942   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 80       |RX J1319.9+5235     |   1.00     |N  |199.9879  | 52.5925   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 81       |PG 1322+659         |   1.00     |N  |200.9563  | 65.6967   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 82       |IRAS 13349+2438     |   1.00     |N  |204.3279  | 24.3842   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 83       |MKN 730             |   1.00     |N  |205.9863  | 25.6467   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 84       |CTS 103             |   1.00     |N  |207.8750  |-18.2297   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 85       |RX J1355.2+5612     |   1.00     |N  |208.8192  | 56.2125   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 86       |PG 1402+261         |   1.00     |N  |211.3175  | 25.9261   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 87       |RX J1413.6+7029     |   1.00     |N  |213.4029  | 70.4972   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 88       |NGC 5548            |   1.00     |N  |214.4996  | 25.1367   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 89       |QSO 1421-0013       |   1.00     |N  |216.0158  | -0.4494   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 90       |MKN 813             |   1.00     |N  |216.8542  | 19.8314   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 91       |MKN 684             |   1.00     |N  |217.7671  | 28.2872   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 92       |MKN 478             |   1.00     |N  |220.5312  | 35.4397   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 93       |PG 1448+273         |   1.00     |N  |222.7867  | 27.1575   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 94       |MS 1456.4+2147      |   1.00     |N  |224.6792  | 21.6028   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 95       |MKN 841             |   1.00     |N  |226.0050  | 10.4378   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 96       |SBS 1527+564        |   1.00     |N  |232.2812  | 56.2686   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 97       |1ES 1539+18         |   1.00     |N  |235.5583  | 18.5831   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 98       |PKS 1545+210        |   1.00     |N  |236.4333  | 20.8714   |
1316007|GRUPE           | 99       |CG 1331             |   1.00     |N  |239.1792  | 29.8131   |
1316007|GRUPE           |100       |MKN 493             |   1.00     |N  |239.7904  | 35.0300   |
1316007|GRUPE           |101       |MKN 876             |   1.00     |N  |243.4883  | 65.7197   |
1316007|GRUPE           |102       |PG 1612+261         |   1.00     |N  |243.5542  | 26.0711   |
1316007|GRUPE           |103       |H1613+06            |   1.00     |N  |244.4417  |  6.0653   |
1316007|GRUPE           |104       |RX J1618.1+3619     |   1.00     |N  |244.5392  | 36.3328   |
1316007|GRUPE           |105       |KUG 1618+40         |   1.00     |N  |244.9638  | 40.9800   |
1316007|GRUPE           |106       |PG 1626+554         |   1.00     |N  |246.9837  | 55.3756   |
1316007|GRUPE           |107       |EXO 1627+4014       |   1.00     |N  |247.2554  | 40.1333   |
1316007|GRUPE           |108       |RX J1702+3247       |   1.00     |N  |255.6296  | 32.7889   |
1316007|GRUPE           |109       |HB 1721+343         |   1.00     |N  |260.8375  | 34.2994   |
1316007|GRUPE           |110       |RX J2039.4-3018     |   1.00     |N  |309.8625  |-30.3147   |
1316007|GRUPE           |111       |1H 2107-097         |   1.00     |N  |317.2917  | -9.6711   |
1316007|GRUPE           |112       |II ZW 136           |   1.00     |N  |323.1162  | 10.1389   |
1316007|GRUPE           |113       |IRAS 2132-6237      |   1.00     |N  |324.0958  |-62.4003   |
1316007|GRUPE           |114       |PKS 2135-147        |   1.00     |N  |324.4375  |-14.5486   |
1316007|GRUPE           |115       |RX J2144.1-3949     |   1.00     |N  |326.0250  |-39.8172   |
1316007|GRUPE           |116       |RX J2146.6-3051     |   1.00     |N  |326.6500  |-30.8614   |
1316007|GRUPE           |117       |RX J2149.9-1859     |   1.00     |N  |327.4917  |-18.9900   |
1316007|GRUPE           |118       |RX J2159.0-1752     |   1.00     |N  |329.7500  |-17.8789   |
1316007|GRUPE           |119       |ESO 404-G029        |   1.00     |N  |331.9375  |-32.5836   |
1316007|GRUPE           |120       |NGC 7214            |   1.00     |N  |332.2792  |-27.8100   |
1316007|GRUPE           |121       |RX J2216.8-4451     |   1.00     |N  |334.2217  |-44.8658   |
1316007|GRUPE           |122       |RX J2217.9-5941     |   1.00     |N  |334.4858  |-59.6917   |
1316007|GRUPE           |123       |PKS 2227-399        |   1.00     |N  |337.6679  |-39.7144   |
1316007|GRUPE           |124       |RX J2242.6-3845     |   1.00     |N  |340.6571  |-38.7544   |
1316007|GRUPE           |125       |RX J2245.2-4652     |   1.00     |N  |243.4883  | 65.7197   |
1316007|GRUPE           |126       |RX J2250.2-1150     |   1.00     |N  |342.5583  |-11.8667   |
1316007|GRUPE           |127       |MR 2251-178         |   1.00     |N  |343.5250  |-17.5819   |
1316007|GRUPE           |128       |RX J2256.6+0525     |   1.00     |N  |344.1542  |  5.4211   |
1316007|GRUPE           |129       |MS 2254-36          |   1.00     |N  |344.4125  |-36.9353   |
1316007|GRUPE           |130       |RX J2258.7-2609     |   1.00     |N  |344.6892  |-26.1539   |
1316007|GRUPE           |131       |RX J2301.6-5913     |   1.00     |N  |345.4008  |-59.2222   |
1316007|GRUPE           |132       |RX J2301.8-5508     |   1.00     |N  |345.4667  |-55.1419   |
1316007|GRUPE           |133       |RX J2304.6-3501     |   1.00     |N  |346.1554  |-35.0203   |
1316007|GRUPE           |134       |RX J2312.5-3404     |   1.00     |N  |348.1450  |-34.0722   |
1316007|GRUPE           |135       |RX J2317.8-4422     |   1.00     |N  |349.4579  |-44.3744   |
1316007|GRUPE           |136       |RX J2318.8-6219     |   1.00     |N  |349.7125  |-62.3225   |
1316007|GRUPE           |137       |NGC 7609            |   1.00     |N  |349.7125  |  0.2439   |
1316007|GRUPE           |138       |RX J2325.2-3236     |   1.00     |N  |351.2992  |-32.6097   |
1316007|GRUPE           |139       |IRAS 23226-3843     |   1.00     |N  |351.3508  |-38.4469   |
1316007|GRUPE           |140       |MS 23409-1511       |   1.00     |N  |355.8692  |-14.9250   |
1316007|GRUPE           |141       |RX J2349.4-3126     |   1.00     |N  |357.3504  |-31.4342   |
1316007|GRUPE           |142       |PG 2349-014         |   1.00     |N  |357.9833  | -1.1536   |
1316007|GRUPE           |143       |AM 2354-304         |   1.00     |N  |359.3667  |-30.4611   |
1316009|KENNEA          |  1       |MAXI TRANSIENT #1   |   1.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316009|KENNEA          |  2       |MAXI TRANSIENT #2   |   1.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316009|KENNEA          |  3       |MAXI TRANSIENT #3   |   1.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316009|KENNEA          |  4       |MAXI TRANSIENT #4   |   2.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316009|KENNEA          |  5       |MAXI TRANSIENT #5   |   2.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316009|KENNEA          |  6       |MAXI TRANSIENT #6   |   3.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316009|KENNEA          |  7       |MAXI TRANSIENT #7   |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316009|KENNEA          |  8       |MAXI TRANSIENT #8   |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316017|GODET           |  1       |ESO 243-49          |  40.00     |N  | 17.6179  |-46.0729   |
1316035|MARSHALL        |  1       |PSR B0540-69        |  24.00     |N  | 85.0467  |-69.3317   |
1316063|MARGUTTI        |  1       |IIN-SN1             |  49.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316063|MARGUTTI        |  2       |IIN-SN2             |  49.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           |  1       |OPTCANDIDATE#1      |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           |  2       |OPTCANDIDATE#2      |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           |  3       |OPTCANDIDATE#3      |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           |  4       |OPTCANDIDATE#4      |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           |  5       |OPTCANDIDATE#5      |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           |  6       |OPTCANDIDATE#6      |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           |  7       |OPTCANDIDATE#7      |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           |  8       |OPTCANDIDATE#8      |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           |  9       |OPTCANDIDATE#9      |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316064|CORSI           | 10       |OPTCANDIDATE#10     |   4.50     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316076|DEGENAAR        |  1       |QUIESCENT SOURCE    |  50.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316084|BOGDANOV        |  1       |PULSAR              | 100.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316085|NARDINI         |  1       |PDS 456             |  60.00     |N  |262.0829  |-14.2656   |
1316104|HENZE           |  1       |M31N 2008-12A       |  84.00     |Y  | 11.3704  | 41.9028   |
1316106|HOLDER          |  1       |PSR J2032+4127      |  84.00     |N  |308.0547  | 41.4568   |
1316116|LONGSTAFF       |  1       |NLTT 5306           |  16.20     |N  | 23.8874  | 14.7655   |
1316117|CHERNYAKOVA     |  1       |PSR J2032+4127      |  92.00     |N  |308.0500  | 41.4600   |
1316119|PRITCHARD       |  1       |DWF_TRANSIENT       |  16.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316125|BODEWITS        |  1       |COMET 41P/T-G-K     |  31.20     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316128|SORIA           |  1       |NGC7793-P13         |  99.00     |N  |359.4625  |-32.6241   |
1316134|DEGENAAR        |  1       |VFXT                |  30.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316135|WARGELIN        |  1       |PROXIMA CEN         |  38.00     |N  |217.3884  |-62.6757   |
1316155|MEHDIPOUR       |  1       |ARK 564             |  15.00     |N  |340.6638  | 29.7254   |
1316155|MEHDIPOUR       |  2       |MR 2251-178         |  10.00     |N  |343.5242  |-17.5819   |
1316155|MEHDIPOUR       |  3       |MRK 335             |  11.00     |N  |  1.5816  | 20.2029   |
1316155|MEHDIPOUR       |  4       |MRK 509             |   8.00     |N  |311.0407  |-10.7234   |
1316155|MEHDIPOUR       |  5       |MRK 841             |  13.00     |N  |226.0049  | 10.4379   |
1316155|MEHDIPOUR       |  6       |NGC 3783            |  15.00     |N  |174.7572  |-37.7385   |
1316155|MEHDIPOUR       |  7       |NGC 4593            |  11.00     |N  |189.9145  | -5.3442   |
1316155|MEHDIPOUR       |  8       |NGC 7469            |  13.00     |N  |345.8153  |  8.8737   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        |  1       |ZTFSWIFT1           |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        |  2       |ZTFSWIFT2           |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        |  3       |ZTFSWIFT3           |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        |  4       |ZTFSWIFT4           |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        |  5       |ZTFSWIFT5           |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        |  6       |ZTFSWIFT6           |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        |  7       |ZTFSWIFT7           |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        |  8       |ZTFSWIFT8           |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        |  9       |ZTFSWIFT9           |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        | 10       |ZTFSWIFT10          |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        | 11       |ZTFSWIFT11          |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316157|KASLIWAL        | 12       |ZTFSWIFT12          |   5.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316173|HAIMAN          |  1       |PKS1302-102         |  28.00     |N  |196.3875  |-10.5554   |
1316180|KAUR            |  1       |3FGL J0427.3-3900   |   2.00     |N  | 66.8402  |-39.0171   |
1316180|KAUR            |  2       |3FGL J1508.7-4956   |   2.00     |N  |227.1623  |-49.8840   |
1316180|KAUR            |  3       |3FGL J0627.9-1517   |   2.00     |N  | 96.9718  |-15.3344   |
1316180|KAUR            |  4       |3FGL J1645.2-5747   |   2.00     |N  |251.3060  |-57.8562   |
1316180|KAUR            |  5       |3FGL J1224.6-8312   |   2.00     |N  |186.2266  |-83.2195   |
1316180|KAUR            |  6       |3FGL J0700.0+1709   |   2.00     |N  |105.0064  | 17.1560   |
1316180|KAUR            |  7       |3FGL J1304.3-5535   |   2.00     |N  |195.9551  |-55.6754   |
1316180|KAUR            |  8       |3FGL J2007.7-7728   |   2.00     |N  |301.7769  |-77.5117   |
1316180|KAUR            |  9       |3FGL J0912.6-2757   |   2.00     |N  |138.1316  |-27.8714   |
1316180|KAUR            | 10       |3FGL J2107.7-4822   |   2.00     |N  |316.9354  |-48.4674   |
1316180|KAUR            | 11       |3FGL J1525.2-5905   |   2.00     |N  |231.2130  |-59.0610   |
1316180|KAUR            | 12       |3FGL J1630.8+1047   |   2.00     |N  |247.8282  | 10.8674   |
1316180|KAUR            | 13       |3FGL J1822.1-7051   |   2.00     |N  |275.8736  |-70.9333   |
1316180|KAUR            | 14       |3FGL J1509.9-2951   |   2.00     |N  |227.5378  |-29.8593   |
1316181|BROWN           |  1       |SN2016GKG-NGC613    |   4.00     |N  | 23.5757  |-29.4184   |
1316181|BROWN           |  2       |SN2016FEJ-NGC6942   |   4.00     |N  |310.1577  |-54.3031   |
1316181|BROWN           |  3       |GAIA16AWF-HOST      |   4.00     |N  | 46.9729  |-69.0298   |
1316181|BROWN           |  4       |SN2016ENK-UGC09857  |   4.00     |N  |231.6307  | 41.7252   |
1316181|BROWN           |  5       |SN2016EJA-2MAS      |   4.00     |N  |336.3815  | 38.9839   |
1316181|BROWN           |  6       |SN2016EWR-UGC11214  |   4.00     |N  |275.7219  | 12.4294   |
1316181|BROWN           |  7       |SN2016EUJ-E479-G7   |   4.00     |N  | 36.8410  |-23.9288   |
1316181|BROWN           |  8       |SN2016EOA-HOST      |   4.00     |N  |  5.3463  | 22.4356   |
1316181|BROWN           |  9       |SN2016EKT-HOST      |   4.00     |N  |328.3662  |-34.4058   |
1316181|BROWN           | 10       |SN2016EKG-PGC67803  |   4.00     |N  |330.0150  |-30.1853   |
1316181|BROWN           | 11       |SN16EIY-E509-G64    |   4.00     |N  |203.6633  |-23.6796   |
1316181|BROWN           | 12       |SN16DAJ-MCG+3-6-31  |   4.00     |N  | 31.1521  | 21.5918   |
1316181|BROWN           | 13       |SN2016CQJ-CG382-5   |   4.00     |N  |359.0561  | -0.5407   |
1316181|BROWN           | 14       |SN2016COJ-NGC4125   |   4.00     |N  |182.0251  | 65.1741   |
1316181|BROWN           | 15       |SN2016COI-UGC11868  |   4.00     |N  |329.7695  | 18.1774   |
1316181|BROWN           | 16       |AT2016CNY-HOST      |   4.00     |N  |305.7088  | 22.7027   |
1316181|BROWN           | 17       |SN2016CNX-2MASHOST  |   4.00     |N  |151.7227  |-15.7174   |
1316181|BROWN           | 18       |IPTF16AUF-HOST      |   4.00     |N  |217.7886  | 27.2361   |
1316181|BROWN           | 19       |SN2016DXV-HOST      |   4.00     |N  |273.1225  | 31.2798   |
1316181|BROWN           | 20       |PSN-NGC2442         |   4.00     |N  |114.0992  |-69.5308   |
1316181|BROWN           | 21       |SN2016BLZ-SDSSHOST  |   4.00     |N  |235.1221  |  0.9104   |
1316181|BROWN           | 22       |SN-PGC054958        |   4.00     |N  |230.8967  |  9.3461   |
1316181|BROWN           | 23       |SN2016BAU-NGC3631   |   4.00     |N  |170.2621  | 53.1694   |
1316181|BROWN           | 24       |SN2016AQF-NGC2101   |   4.00     |N  | 86.6008  |-52.0886   |
1316181|BROWN           | 25       |SN16AIY-E323-G84    |   4.00     |N  |197.1083  |-41.9767   |
1316181|BROWN           | 26       |SN2016L-UGCA397     |   4.00     |N  |225.1012  |-13.5519   |
1316181|BROWN           | 27       |SN2016P-NGC5374     |   4.00     |N  |209.3733  |  6.0969   |
1316181|BROWN           | 28       |SN2016B-PGC037392   |   4.00     |N  |178.7704  |  1.7197   |
1316181|BROWN           | 29       |ASASSN-15UM-2MASXJ  |   4.00     |N  | 38.8929  | -6.0639   |
1316181|BROWN           | 30       |ASASSN-15UA-SDSS    |   4.00     |N  |203.7270  | 10.9846   |
1316181|BROWN           | 31       |SN-NGC7123          |   4.00     |N  |327.6942  |-70.3342   |
1316181|BROWN           | 32       |SN2015BQ-PGC41898   |   4.00     |N  |188.7765  | 31.2432   |
1316181|BROWN           | 33       |SN2015BF-NGC7653    |   4.00     |N  |351.2054  | 15.2756   |
1316181|BROWN           | 34       |PS15CWW-HOST        |   4.00     |N  | 74.1404  |  4.7573   |
1316181|BROWN           | 35       |PS15CES-HOST        |   4.00     |N  | 24.6862  |-23.1262   |
1316181|BROWN           | 36       |SKYS6-HOST          |   4.00     |N  | 47.8197  |  1.1930   |
1316181|BROWN           | 37       |PS15BR-HOST         |   4.00     |N  |171.3301  |  8.2385   |
1316181|BROWN           | 38       |A-15QH-ESO534-G24   |   4.00     |N  |341.3112  |-22.7308   |
1316181|BROWN           | 39       |DES15S2NR-HOST      |   4.00     |N  | 40.1859  | -0.8907   |
1316181|BROWN           | 40       |PS15BLQ-HOST        |   4.00     |N  |262.9265  | 43.8928   |
1316181|BROWN           | 41       |SN2015AH-UGC12295   |   4.00     |N  |345.0987  |  1.6267   |
1316181|BROWN           | 42       |SN2015AP-IC1776     |   4.00     |N  | 31.3133  |  6.1069   |
1316181|BROWN           | 43       |A-15OZ-HIPASS       |   4.00     |N  |289.8433  |-33.8525   |
1316181|BROWN           | 44       |ASASSN-15MJ-HOST    |   4.00     |N  |210.5652  | 33.6612   |
1316181|BROWN           | 45       |A-15KG-2MASHOST     |   4.00     |N  |130.0488  | -4.5936   |
1316181|BROWN           | 46       |SN2013BS-NGC6343    |   4.00     |N  |259.3178  | 41.0527   |
1316192|ARCAVI          |  1       |TDE1                |  25.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316192|ARCAVI          |  2       |TDE2                |  25.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316192|ARCAVI          |  3       |TDE3                |  25.00     |Y  |  0.0000  |  0.0000   |
1316198|HARRISON        |  1       |NGC 5907 X-1        | 104.00     |N  |228.9957  | 56.3030   |
1316198|HARRISON        |  2       |NGC 7793 P13        |  41.00     |N  |359.4625  |-32.6241   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     |  1       |Q1016-006           |   7.00     |N  |154.7498  | -0.9056   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     |  2       |Q1137+305           |   3.00     |N  |175.0975  | 30.2810   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     |  3       |Q1225-017           |   3.00     |N  |186.9966  | -2.0510   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     |  4       |Q1237+134           |   3.50     |N  |190.0550  | 13.1578   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     |  5       |Q1443-010           |   5.00     |N  |221.4981  | -1.2216   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     |  6       |Q1517+239           |   4.00     |N  |229.8056  | 23.7827   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     |  7       |Q0109+176           |   3.50     |N  | 17.9576  | 17.8976   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     |  8       |Q0751+298           |   2.00     |N  |118.7430  | 29.6984   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     |  9       |Q0856+124           |   5.00     |N  |134.8907  | 12.2759   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 10       |Q1055+499           |   3.00     |N  |164.5544  | 49.6600   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 11       |Q1116+128           |   2.50     |N  |169.7388  | 12.5783   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 12       |Q1318+113           |   4.00     |N  |200.3285  | 11.1139   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 13       |Q1323+655           |   2.00     |N  |201.3738  | 65.2537   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 14       |Q1607+183           |   3.50     |N  |242.5220  | 18.1954   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 15       |Q1702+298           |   2.00     |N  |256.0296  | 29.7830   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 16       |Q1816+475           |   4.00     |N  |274.5811  | 47.6122   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 17       |Q1857+566           |   2.50     |N  |284.6118  | 56.7657   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 18       |Q2048+196           |   2.50     |N  |312.8031  | 19.8351   |
1316208|VESTERGAARD     | 19       |Q2248+192           |   2.00     |N  |342.6366  | 19.5222   |
1316216|MARSCHER        |  1       |MKN421              |  21.00     |N  |166.1138  | 38.2088   |
1316216|MARSCHER        |  2       |0716+714            |  42.00     |N  |110.4727  | 71.3434   |
1316216|MARSCHER        |  3       |1ES1959+650         |  14.00     |N  |299.9994  | 65.1485   |
1316216|MARSCHER        |  4       |3C66A               |  28.00     |N  | 35.6650  | 43.0355   |
1316216|MARSCHER        |  5       |BLLAC               |  42.00     |N  |330.6804  | 42.2778   |
1316216|MARSCHER        |  6       |MKN501              |  21.00     |N  |253.4676  | 39.7602   |
1316225|HOMAN           |  1       |4U 1636-536         | 100.00     |Y  |266.2780  |-30.3787   |
1316232|HUGHES          |  1       |PSZ2_G002.04-22.15  |   3.00     |N  |291.3596  |-36.5179   |
1316232|HUGHES          |  2       |PSZ2_G003.21-76.04  |   3.00     |N  |358.3512  |-33.2933   |
1316232|HUGHES          |  3       |PSZ2_G009.04+31.09  |   3.00     |N  |244.5860  | -4.1893   |
1316232|HUGHES          |  4       |PSZ2_G010.76-16.91  |   3.00     |N  |288.9424  |-26.9948   |
1316232|HUGHES          |  5       |PSZ2_G013.06-75.46  |   3.00     |N  |356.8526  |-31.1509   |
1316232|HUGHES          |  6       |PSZ2_G018.73-15.49  |   3.00     |N  |290.7771  |-19.3992   |
1316232|HUGHES          |  7       |PSZ2_G018.92-33.64  |   3.00     |N  |309.2781  |-25.5930   |
1316232|HUGHES          |  8       |PSZ2_G023.87-13.88  |   3.00     |N  |291.3960  |-14.2055   |
1316232|HUGHES          |  9       |PSZ2_G027.99-69.85  |   3.00     |N  |350.2088  |-27.0300   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 10       |PSZ2_G031.37-71.95  |   3.00     |N  |352.6812  |-26.1713   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 11       |PSZ2_G032.31+66.07  |   3.00     |N  |219.2979  | 24.3893   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 12       |PSZ2_G032.77+19.69  |   3.00     |N  |265.1225  |  8.7112   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 13       |PSZ2_G035.89-61.39  |   3.00     |N  |341.7593  |-22.2282   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 14       |PSZ2_G040.11-42.58  |   3.00     |N  |324.2707  |-13.0963   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 15       |PSZ2_G043.44-41.27  |   3.00     |N  |324.1836  |-10.2966   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 16       |PSZ2_G045.20+15.63  |   3.00     |N  |274.0146  | 17.7622   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 17       |PSZ2_G045.47+17.80  |   3.00     |N  |272.0322  | 18.8743   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 18       |PSZ2_G051.40-61.15  |   3.00     |N  |344.5480  |-15.2724   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 19       |PSZ2_G058.31+41.96  |   3.00     |N  |249.0508  | 36.0554   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 20       |PSZ2_G059.52+16.23  |   3.00     |N  |279.3393  | 30.6642   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 21       |PSZ2_G059.76+14.59  |   3.00     |N  |281.1949  | 30.2468   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 22       |PSZ2_G069.47-29.06  |   3.00     |N  |326.5036  | 13.9876   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 23       |PSZ2_G076.81-32.57  |   3.00     |N  |333.6922  | 15.9245   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 24       |PSZ2_G079.36+38.06  |   3.00     |N  |254.8539  | 52.0757   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 25       |PSZ2_G086.35-13.94  |   3.00     |N  |327.4345  | 35.7104   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 26       |PSZ2_G089.06-11.79  |   3.00     |N  |328.2215  | 39.0646   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 27       |PSZ2_G092.64+20.78  |   3.00     |N  |289.1859  | 61.6803   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 28       |PSZ2_G094.31-11.31  |   3.00     |N  |333.2399  | 42.5788   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 29       |PSZ2_G105.00+39.68  |   3.00     |N  |238.1512  | 70.5334   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 30       |PSZ2_G106.11+24.11  |   3.00     |N  |290.3513  | 74.5561   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 31       |PSZ2_G106.21+26.32  |   3.00     |N  |282.1361  | 75.0587   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 32       |PSZ2_G120.76+44.14  |   3.00     |N  |198.1617  | 72.8899   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 33       |PSZ2_G125.25+33.33  |   3.00     |N  |175.5136  | 83.4778   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 34       |PSZ2_G125.55+32.72  |   3.00     |N  |171.3946  | 83.9581   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 35       |PSZ2_G126.36-19.11  |   3.00     |N  | 17.3427  | 43.6337   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 36       |PSZ2_G131.15-14.72  |   3.00     |N  | 24.6439  | 47.3943   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 37       |PSZ2_G139.72-17.13  |   3.00     |N  | 34.9805  | 42.8317   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 38       |PSZ2_G150.64-14.21  |   3.00     |N  | 49.3320  | 40.6769   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 39       |PSZ2_G156.24+22.32  |   3.00     |N  |101.2349  | 59.4509   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 40       |PSZ2_G179.45-43.92  |   3.00     |N  | 49.8117  |  2.1337   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 41       |PSZ2_G180.74-85.21  |   3.00     |N  | 17.3079  |-24.5108   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 42       |PSZ2_G183.92-68.82  |   3.00     |N  | 32.0046  |-15.6243   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 43       |PSZ2_G183.92+16.36  |   3.00     |N  |105.4894  | 32.8598   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 44       |PSZ2_G185.68+09.82  |   3.00     |N  | 99.3390  | 28.6406   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 45       |PSZ2_G186.50-13.45  |   3.00     |N  | 77.9523  | 16.2059   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 46       |PSZ2_G193.90+09.41  |   3.00     |N  |102.7991  | 21.1486   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 47       |PSZ2_G195.03-79.43  |   3.00     |N  | 23.8236  |-23.4607   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 48       |PSZ2_G210.02-56.38  |   3.00     |N  | 49.1153  |-20.7779   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 49       |PSZ2_G218.58+08.71  |   3.00     |N  |113.1884  | -1.0031   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 50       |PSZ2_G225.18-33.61  |   3.00     |N  | 75.9984  |-24.1887   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 51       |PSZ2_G225.76-17.35  |   3.00     |N  | 92.5720  |-18.9449   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 52       |PSZ2_G226.12-19.51  |   3.00     |N  | 90.6140  |-20.1029   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 53       |PSZ2_G227.30+09.00  |   3.00     |N  |117.5643  | -8.4398   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 54       |PSZ2_G229.40-15.49  |   3.00     |N  | 95.8814  |-21.4042   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 55       |PSZ2_G232.27+12.59  |   3.00     |N  |123.1990  |-10.8506   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 56       |PSZ2_G240.03-19.81  |   3.00     |N  | 95.6319  |-32.4179   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 57       |PSZ2_G240.71-74.03  |   3.00     |N  | 29.8348  |-33.5395   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 58       |PSZ2_G242.74-11.66  |   3.00     |N  |105.6922  |-31.7029   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 59       |PSZ2_G246.45-07.68  |   3.00     |N  |111.8393  |-33.2310   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 60       |PSZ2_G246.91+24.65  |   3.00     |N  |141.5201  |-15.1874   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 61       |PSZ2_G247.14+25.88  |   3.00     |N  |142.6283  |-14.5478   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 62       |PSZ2_G250.43-09.02  |   3.00     |N  |112.6019  |-37.3537   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 63       |PSZ2_G251.21-16.74  |   3.00     |N  |103.9363  |-41.2525   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 64       |PSZ2_G251.55-42.78  |   3.00     |N  | 68.2533  |-45.8395   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 65       |PSZ2_G253.43+30.57  |   3.00     |N  |150.0920  |-15.4101   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 66       |PSZ2_G256.41+32.31  |   3.00     |N  |153.2545  |-15.8916   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 67       |PSZ2_G263.65+27.87  |   3.00     |N  |155.3216  |-23.3149   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 68       |PSZ2_G268.07+09.39  |   3.00     |N  |145.2400  |-40.2459   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 69       |PSZ2_G270.07-20.02  |   3.00     |N  |109.0293  |-59.1584   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 70       |PSZ2_G270.45-14.50  |   3.00     |N  |118.9005  |-57.2499   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 71       |PSZ2_G270.88+37.23  |   3.00     |N  |166.3312  |-18.9486   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 72       |PSZ2_G271.04-12.16  |   3.00     |N  |123.1561  |-56.5993   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 73       |PSZ2_G271.15+21.10  |   3.00     |N  |157.0897  |-32.7955   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 74       |PSZ2_G271.53+36.41  |   3.00     |N  |166.3725  |-19.9187   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 75       |PSZ2_G271.55+26.00  |   3.00     |N  |160.5608  |-28.8802   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 76       |PSZ2_G274.73-16.79  |   3.00     |N  |118.6130  |-61.9601   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 77       |PSZ2_G277.93+12.34  |   3.00     |N  |158.0673  |-43.6660   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 78       |PSZ2_G278.56+10.74  |   3.00     |N  |157.6283  |-45.3503   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 79       |PSZ2_G278.92+31.06  |   3.00     |N  |169.7376  |-27.4578   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 80       |PSZ2_G280.39-10.48  |   3.00     |N  |136.6507  |-63.0359   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 81       |PSZ2_G284.30-26.75  |   3.00     |N  | 99.8762  |-73.4026   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 82       |PSZ2_G285.18+16.11  |   3.00     |N  |169.0743  |-43.4528   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 83       |PSZ2_G285.28-47.35  |   3.00     |N  | 42.5380  |-65.4994   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 84       |PSZ2_G287.55-14.25  |   3.00     |N  |141.6886  |-70.7315   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 85       |PSZ2_G289.50+32.71  |   3.00     |N  |179.9769  |-28.8047   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 86       |PSZ2_G292.04+22.91  |   3.00     |N  |179.9441  |-38.8609   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 87       |PSZ2_G293.35-10.50  |   3.00     |N  |162.5449  |-71.0898   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 88       |PSZ2_G296.59-10.50  |   3.00     |N  |171.9015  |-72.3373   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 89       |PSZ2_G297.91+31.43  |   3.00     |N  |187.8533  |-31.2422   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 90       |PSZ2_G299.54+17.83  |   3.00     |N  |188.3018  |-44.9185   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 91       |PSZ2_G305.59-54.80  |   3.00     |N  |  9.5578  |-62.2546   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 92       |PSZ2_G308.04-15.48  |   3.00     |N  |216.0946  |-77.4267   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 93       |PSZ2_G310.22+23.02  |   3.00     |N  |201.5512  |-39.3545   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 94       |PSZ2_G311.33-48.50  |   3.00     |N  |358.1153  |-67.6485   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 95       |PSZ2_G315.71-83.81  |   3.00     |N  | 11.2292  |-33.1467   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 96       |PSZ2_G316.43+54.02  |   3.00     |N  |200.8195  | -8.0130   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 97       |PSZ2_G316.89-32.24  |   3.00     |N  |309.0955  |-76.8456   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 98       |PSZ2_G317.79+26.63  |   3.00     |N  |208.9920  |-34.3670   |
1316232|HUGHES          | 99       |PSZ2_G322.44+20.29  |   3.00     |N  |216.6179  |-38.9512   |
1316232|HUGHES          |100       |PSZ2_G323.96+43.81  |   3.00     |N  |208.5255  |-16.4826   |
1316232|HUGHES          |101       |PSZ2_G325.19+49.12  |   3.00     |N  |207.4979  |-11.1993   |
1316232|HUGHES          |102       |PSZ2_G328.05+15.79  |   3.00     |N  |225.4370  |-40.6348   |
1316232|HUGHES          |103       |PSZ2_G337.95+22.70  |   3.00     |N  |230.4399  |-29.7549   |
1316232|HUGHES          |104       |PSZ2_G339.74-51.08  |   3.00     |N  |333.7590  |-53.3557   |
1316232|HUGHES          |105       |PSZ2_G341.09-33.15  |   3.00     |N  |302.6888  |-56.6366   |
1316232|HUGHES          |106       |PSZ2_G343.68+24.10  |   3.00     |N  |234.1435  |-25.4147   |
1316232|HUGHES          |107       |PSZ2_G349.18+38.66  |   3.00     |N  |227.9724  |-11.2785   |
1316232|HUGHES          |108       |PSZ2_G353.36-26.49  |   3.00     |N  |294.1021  |-45.2954   |
1316232|HUGHES          |109       |PSZ2_G356.21-43.11  |   3.00     |N  |317.8340  |-44.4344   |
1316232|HUGHES          |110       |PSZ2_G356.88-11.33  |   3.00     |N  |276.5106  |-37.0974   |
1316232|HUGHES          |111       |PSZ2_G358.80-10.83  |   3.00     |N  |276.9624  |-35.1774   |
1316232|HUGHES          |112       |PSZ1_G021.88+17.75  |   3.00     |N  |262.0861  | -1.3443   |
1316232|HUGHES          |113       |PSZ1_G027.95+15.63  |   3.00     |N  |266.7043  |  2.7767   |
1316232|HUGHES          |114       |PSZ1_G028.15-08.63  |   3.00     |N  |288.4257  | -8.1477   |
1316232|HUGHES          |115       |PSZ1_G078.39+46.13  |   3.00     |N  |242.2712  | 50.2100   |
1316232|HUGHES          |116       |PSZ1_G123.39+30.62  |   3.00     |N  |186.4330  | 86.4758   |
1316232|HUGHES          |117       |PSZ1_G135.68+45.61  |   3.00     |N  |167.4548  | 68.9123   |
1316232|HUGHES          |118       |PSZ1_G262.45+49.34  |   3.00     |N  |167.7163  | -5.4615   |
1316232|HUGHES          |119       |PSZ1_G278.94-17.62  |   3.00     |N  |121.0917  |-65.9301   |
1316232|HUGHES          |120       |PSZ1_G281.49-08.34  |   3.00     |N  |141.6462  |-62.3463   |
1316232|HUGHES          |121       |PSZ1_G286.07-42.77  |   3.00     |N  | 49.7588  |-69.2222   |
1316232|HUGHES          |122       |PSZ1_G297.20-44.90  |   3.00     |N  | 25.8264  |-71.6406   |
1316232|HUGHES          |123       |PSZ1_G305.77+44.80  |   3.00     |N  |194.9768  |-18.0330   |
1316232|HUGHES          |124       |PSZ1_G306.96+50.58  |   3.00     |N  |195.4777  |-12.2070   |
1316232|HUGHES          |125       |PSZ1_G309.93+09.20  |   3.00     |N  |204.3975  |-53.0369   |
1316232|HUGHES          |126       |PSZ1_G311.65-18.48  |   3.00     |N  |237.5553  |-78.2006   |
1316232|HUGHES          |127       |PSZ1_G312.36+17.83  |   3.00     |N  |205.3896  |-44.1040   |
1316232|HUGHES          |128       |PSZ1_G323.34+27.37  |   3.00     |N  |214.2706  |-32.0827   |
1316232|HUGHES          |129       |PSZ1_G327.27+11.05  |   3.00     |N  |227.8356  |-45.1025   |
1316232|HUGHES          |130       |PSZ1_G327.61-06.08  |   3.00     |N  |245.4434  |-58.4759   |
1316232|HUGHES          |131       |PSZ1_G337.21-12.59  |   3.00     |N  |265.3503  |-54.7811   |
1316232|HUGHES          |132       |PSZ1_G349.51-06.86  |   3.00     |N  |266.9918  |-41.4479   |
1316232|HUGHES          |133       |PSZ1_G357.43+30.60  |   3.00     |N  |238.6790  |-12.2806   |


Proposal Abstracts

1316130 / THOMAS MACCARONE / TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

KEY PROJECT  "THE SWIFT GALACTIC BULGE MONITORING SURVEY"

We propose to survey a 16 square degree region of the Galactic Bulge, every two weeks during the part of the year when the survey region is observable to Swift. This will allow us to detect new very faint X-ray transients -- objects bright enough that they must be X-ray binaries, but too faint to be detected by all sky instruments. These objects are likely to dominate the total number of X-ray binaries, but they are still known in small numbers due to their faintness. We expect to double the number of known VFXTs, and to detect the new objects in regions in which their quiescent emission is already well probed with Chandra and other multi-wavelength data.

1316154 / RICK EDELSON / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK)

KEY PROJECT  "THE SWIFT AGN ACCRETION DISK REVERBERATION MAPPING PROGRAM: MARKARIAN 509"

Our recent intensive Swift monitoring of NGC 5548 and NGC 4151 resulted in the first clearly successful reverberation mapping (RM) of the AGN accretion disk/corona region, yielding strong evidence that the disk is larger than predicted and that the X-rays undergo additional reprocessing before heating the disk. In order to continue to strongly test the standard model by pushing to higher mass and Eddington ratio, we request 239 x 1ks visits on Mrk 509, the brightest radio-quiet AGN in the sky at its mass or higher, once every day when available in 2017. This is the third target in our proposed long-term Key Project to perform disk RM on ~1 dozen AGN over the lifetime of Swift, as this will allow us to look for trends with source parameters such as mass, luminosity and Eddington ratio.

1316209 / CHRYSSA KOUVELIOTOU / GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

KEY PROJECT  "TOWARDS A POPULATION CENSUS OF YOUNG GALACTIC X-RAY SOURCES"

We propose a 2-yr Survey of 40deg of the Galactic Plane for hard X-ray sources (0.1-10keV) with good depth coverage, and large areas to increase their numbers, as well as high angular resolution to enable source identification and follow up studies in multiple wavelengths. We require two sets of 183 XRT pointings at 5ks each for a total of 1.8Ms spread over two years. Our Survey will produce a very rich sample of new sources and transients focused on Magnetars, HMXBs and also covering a broad serendipitous discovery space. Using our multiwavelength pipeline we will analyze all new X-ray sources to complement and enhance the results of the ChaMPlane Survey. Our results will comprise the first deep, homogeneous, and contiguous GP Survey and will significantly contribute to the Swift legacy.

1316229 / IAN MCHARDY / UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON

KEY PROJECT  "SWIFT, HST, ASTROSAT AND GROUND BASED REVERBERATION MAPPING OF MKN110: WHAT DRIVES UV/OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN AGN?"

Swift measurements of wavelength-dependent lags in AGN show that a higher energy band drives the UV/optical variability. But is that band X-rays from the central corona or hard UV emission from the inner disc? Precise lag measurements can distinguish but previous measurements have been confused by absorption. We require lag measurements in an unabsorbed AGN. Mkn110 is an excellent target. It is bright, unabsorbed, with very faint host galaxy. It also has a much higher accretion rate (>40% Edd) than previous targets, allowing study of disc structure, and the lag contribution from the broad line region, in very diffent parameter space. Parallel high energy Astrosat and optical/IR (LCOGT) observations are guaranteed. HST will be applied for. Only Swift can carry out this program.

1316139 / JIAN GE / UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

HIGH-Z CORRELATIVE OBSERVATIONS  "HUNTING HIGH-Z GRBS WITH THE FIRST NEAR-IR IFU SPECTROGRAPH ON A 2M ROBOTIC TELESCOPE"

We propose to operate a NIR (0.9-1.7 microns) fiber bundle Integral Field Unit spectroscopy mode in the FIRST high resolution spectrograph in 2017-2018 for capturing medium-resolution GRB NIR spectra within 10 minutes of the trigger release by Swift using the AST 2m robotic telescope in Arizona. The broad simultaneous NIR wavelength coverage (0.9-1.7 micron) will allow the prompt identification of GRBs in the z=6.5-13 redshift range and the acquisition of high S/N afterglow spectra which can constrain the high-z GRB rate, shedding light on the fate of massive stars, their role on re-ionization, cosmic star formation rate at high redshifts, and investigate the chemical content (e.g. neutral hydrogen, metal enrichment) of the first generation of galaxies during the re-ionization epoch.

1316004 / EDO BERGER / HARVARD UNIVERSITY

"UNIQUE INSIGHTS INTO SWIFT GRBS WITH THE VLA AND ALMA"

Radio observations of GRB afterglows with the VLA and ALMA can address several fundamental open questions in GRB science: (1) the composition of the relativistic ejecta through observations of the reverse shock radio emission, (2) the explosion properties of short GRBs, with implications for radio counterparts of Advanced LIGO sources, and (3) whether high-redshift GRBs form a distinct population that may point to Pop III massive star progenitors. Here we propose to address these questions using on-going JVLA and new ALMA programs, which represent the most comprehensive radio/millimeter view of Swift GRBs. The proposal takes advantage of the unparalleled sensitivity of JVLA and ALMA, and builds on our long-term success in radio studies of GRBs.

1316007 / DIRK GRUPE / MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY

"LONG-TERM VARIABILITY OF THE SEDS OF AGN"

We propose to re-observe a sample of 143 X-ray bright Active Galactic Nuclei with Swift in order to study the long-term variability of their spectral energy distributions and to study the physical conditions of extreme flux states. The first goal of this program is to understand how important long-term variability is for the scatter found in the relations among AGN, e.g. the aox - luminosity relation and the correlations with the Eddington ratio, and what is the physics behind these variations. The second goal is to catch at least one of these AGN in a deep minimum X-ray flux state (or outburst state) in order to trigger our on-going XMM/NuStar/HST ToO program with the aim to investigate in detail the X-ray spectra during extreme X-ray flux states and their relation to UV absorption.

1316009 / JAMIE KENNEA / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"FINAL YEAR: SWIFT LOCALIZATION OF MAXI DISCOVERED GALACTIC X-RAY TRANSIENTS"

We propose to continue, for the final year of MAXI operations, the highly successful program to use Swift to perform localization of Galactic X-ray Transients newly discovered by MAXI. MAXI scans almost the entire X-ray sky every ~92 minutes, with a source detection sensitivity of ~60 mCrab in one orbit and ~15 mCrab in one day, discovering X-ray transients with 0.1-0.5 degree accuracies in the 0.7-20 keV energy band. Swift is able to provide rapid follow-up observations of MAXI triggers and localization up to 1.4 arc-second error radius, which is vital for identifying any optical/radio counterpart. XRT observations will also provide measurements of the low energy X-ray spectra. UVOT will be used to provide astrometric corrections, and to search for any optical counterparts.

1316017 / OLIVIER GODET / INSTITUT DE RECHERCHE EN ASTROPHYSIQUE ET PLANETOLOGIE

"INVESTIGATING THE INCREASE IN THE OUTBURST RECURRENCE TIME FOR THE INTERMEDIATE MASS BLACK HOLE HLX-1 IN ESO 243-49"

We request 20x2ks snapshots of the intermediate mass black hole ESO 243-49 HLX-1, to be taken every 2-3 weeks from 2017-04-01 to 2018-03-20. These data are essential to further understand 1) how the accretion onto the BH evolves with time (by measuring the outburst duration as well as spectral fitting of the outburst data); 2) how the outburst separation time (likely tracing the orbital period) evolves; and 3) what the ultimate fate of the system will be (e.g. donor ejection). These data will serve to trigger the to-be-proposed XMM-Newton ToO to search for X-ray emission lines when the source is near the outburst peak. Understanding how IMBHs are fed is essential to identify other good candidates for this poorly understood population thought to be the building blocks of supermassive BHs.

1316035 / FRANCIS MARSHALL / NASA/GSFC

"KEEPING CLOSE TRACK OF THE MOST LUMINOUS GAMMA-RAY PULSAR"

The most luminous gamma-ray pulsar is extragalactic, intermittent, and has a tiny braking index. Using Swift observations of the 50 ms pulsar B0540-69 in the LMC, we discovered a large (36%) increase in its spin-down rate, which we interpret as a state change due to a re-configuration of the magnetic field. Further Swift observations revealed a large change in the braking index n from 2.13 0.01 to 0.031 0.013, the new value being smaller than those known for almost any other pulsar. We now see gamma-ray pulsations in the new spin-down state. Continued monitoring will allow us to find a possible change back to its old spin-down state; to look for a change in n; to search for an anticipated change in the gamma-ray flux or pulse profile; and to continue to characterize this extreme pulsar.

1316063 / RAFFAELLA MARGUTTI / NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

"DETAILED MAPPING OF EXTREME MASS-LOSS FROM EVOLVED MASSIVE STARS WITH SWIFT"

Contrary to expectations from current stellar evolutionary models, recent observations uncovered the ejection of shells of material by massive stars in the years before the supernova explosion, thus revealing our inadequate understanding of the last stages of evolution of massive stars. Here we propose a focused Swift project, with the aim to (i) constrain the mass-loss history of massive stars before explosion, employing multi-wavelength observations of the supernova shock breaking out through a dense medium; and (ii) constrain the efficiency of cosmic-ray acceleration by supernova shocks. This study will open up a new window of investigation on the SN shock circum stellar medium interaction.

1316064 / ALESSANDRA CORSI / TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

"RADIO-TO-X-RAY FOLLOW-UP OF ADVANCED LIGO TRIGGERS"

The direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from colliding black holes (BHs) by Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) has marked the start of a new era in astronomy. As ground-based GW detectors progress toward their design sensitivity, GWs from compact object binaries containing at least one neutron star, and their electromagnetic (EM) counterparts, should come into reach. Here, we propose to complement our iPTF/ZTF+VLA follow-up program of aLIGO triggers with data from Swift. A radio plus X-ray detection of the several optical candidates expected to be found in a typical GW trigger error-area would greatly enhance the confidence in the detection, and help identify the nature of the event. Our follow-up program was approved for Swift Cycle 12. Here we ask to renew it for Cycle 13.

1316076 / DEGENAAR, NATHALIE / UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

"UNDERSTANDING THE CRUSTS OF TRANSIENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS"

We propose 50 ks of ToO observations, spread over 25 pointings of 2 ks each, to monitor a transient neutron star X-ray binary as it transitions from outburst to quiescence. Studying how the accretion-heated crust of the neutron star cools after an outburst yields very valuable information about its structure and nuclear reactions occurring in a neutron-rich, high density environment. Investigating how much heat is generated in the outer crustal layers requires dense coverage of the outburst decay and first ~50 days of cooling. Swift is the key instrument to achieve this.

1316082 / AMY LIEN / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (BALTIMORE COUNTY)

"QUANTIFYING THE INSTRUMENTAL EFFECTS AND SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE DURATIONS OF SWIFT/BAT GAMMA-RAY BURST"

The pulse durations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) hold the key to crucial information in understanding the underlying physics. In particular, the widely-adopted classification of long and short GRBs has been commonly used to infer the different origins of GRBs. However, the observed burst duration can suffer from different degrees of instrumental and observational biases, and thus might not reflect the true intrinsic duration. We propose to study the biases of the burst durations in the GRB sample from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), and quantify the instrumental effects and systematic uncertainties on those durations. The proposed study will utilize a code we developed that is capable of simulating BAT GRBs with accurate instrumental response and the BAT trigger algorithm.

1316084 / BOGDANOV, SLAVKO / COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

"OBSERVING THE NEXT X-RAY BINARY-RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR TRANSITION"

Within the past two years, three neutron star binaries have been observed to switch between accreting and rotation-powered pulsar states, thereby unambiguously establishing the long-suspected link between low-mass X-ray binaries and "recycled" pulsars. In the accreting state, they exhibit X-ray and optical variability unlike anything observed in other X-ray binaries. We propose a continuation of our Swift XRT/UVOT target of opportunity program approved in Cycles 10 and 11 to observe the next nearby binary recycled pulsar transformation to an accreting state. This will result in an improved understanding of the peculiar phenomenology of these systems, which may shed light on the little-understood physics of the quiescent regime in neutron star X-ray binaries.

1316085 / EMANUELE NARDINI / KEELE UNIVERSITY

"COUPLING ACCRETION DISK, X-RAY CORONA AND SMBH WIND IN THE LUMINOUS QUASAR PDS 456"

PDS 456 is the most luminous radio-quiet quasar in the local Universe. It has now been extensively studied in the X-rays, showing markedly different spectral shapes and/or flux states at virtually every visit. The optical/UV flux is mildly variable over timescales of months, but striking changes of about 50% are seen in the long term. While the X-ray behavior is mainly (but not exclusively) due to complex absorption, the optical/UV variability is definitely more puzzling, since the two bands appear to be tightly connected. We propose a Swift monitoring campaign of 30x2 ks observations over 6 months to explore the relation between the optical/UV and X-ray variability and its consequences on the powerful SMBH wind, also shedding light on the accretion disk/X-ray corona coupling.

1316099 / NICO CAPPELLUTI / YALE UNIVERSITY

"UNBIASED CLUSTERING MEASURE OF LOCAL AGN WITH SWIFT-BAT"

The goal of the project is to derive for the first time the Halo Occupation Distribution of Swift-BAT X-ray selected AGN from their two point 3D angular correlation function at z~0. The clustering signal will be highly significant and no other instruments provide such a valuable sample. We will characterize with unprecedented precision the environment where local AGN live and grow, constrain their duty cycle and triggering mechanisms and determine which BH parameter depends from the environment. Our clustering analysis will provide an important view on the physics of active galactic nuclei at z=0 and provide a fundamental probe for AGN growth and evolution models.

1316104 / MARTIN HENZE / INSTITUT DE CIENCIES DE L'ESPAI (IEEC-CSIC)

"PROBING THE ERUPTION STATISTICS AND EVOLUTION OF THE UNIQUE RECURRENT NOVA M31N 2008-12A"

M31N 2008-12a is a recurrent nova in M31 with a unique record of eight observed eruptions in the last eight years. Its short period presents the only opportunity to observe a statistically significant number of nova eruptions in detail. We propose a tailored 84-ks Swift X-ray/UV observing campaign of the predicted 2017 eruption as an integral part of a multi-wavelength, multi-year project. We will constrain the small-scale variations from eruption to eruption as well as potential evolutionary trends. This benchmark data set will provide unparalleled insights into binary evolution and the eruption physics that determine the observable parameters. M31N 2008-12a remains the prime candidate for the progenitor of a type Ia supernova or an accretion induced collapse into a neutron star.

1316106 / JAMIE HOLDER / UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

"IDENTIFYING TEV J2032+4130 AND DISCOVERING A NEW TEV BINARY SYSTEM WITH SWIFT AND VERITAS."

The gamma-ray and radio pulsar PSR J2032+4127 has recently been identified as the compact object in a Be-star binary system. The orbit is highly eccentric, with a period of 45-50 years. Periastron is expected to occur within Swift Cycle 13, around November 2017. PSR J2032+4127 is also coincident with TeV J2032+4130, the first unidentified TeV gamma-ray source. We propose to replicate our work with a similar system, HESS J0632+057, by regularly monitoring the source in both X-rays and TeV gamma-rays with Swift and VERITAS. A measurement of correlated flux changes over the periastron approach would firmly establish the connection between these sources, solving the longstanding mystery of the nature of TeV 2032+4130, and adding to the handful of known TeV binary systems.

1316116 / EMMA LONGSTAFF / UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER

"NLTT 5306: ACCRETING FROM A SUB-STELLAR DEGENERATE OBJECT"

NLTT5306 is a white dwarf brown dwarf (WD-BD) close binary system with a ~7700K WD and ~1700K BD. H emission and Na I absorption lines have been observed to originate on the WD. The WD is too cool to emit H, thus this emission is likely due to accretion onto the 0.44Msun WD from its substellar (56MJup) companion. We have recently observed this system with UVOT using W1, M2, and W2 filters and detected an UV excess which is further evidence of accretion. It is currently unclear however, how mass is being accreted by the WD: the BD is underfilling its Roche Lobe, there is no evidence of a B field above ~1MG, and a wind off of a substellar degenerate object is unlikely. Swift observations will allow us to determine how mass is being accreted by this unusual binary.

1316117 / MARIA CHERNYAKOVA / DUBLIN CITY UNIVERSITY

"X-RAY MONITORING OF PSR J2032+4127 MOVING TOWARDS PERIASTRON"

PSR J2032+4127 / MT91 213 is a 143 ms pulsar in a very eccentric, long orbital period binary system. The pulsar is expected to reach periastron in November 2017 with its high-mass Be star companion. In X-ray, the brightening of this source has been obvious over the last few years, and is thought to be a close analogue of the classical system PSR B1259-63. This affords a unique opportunity to probe the wind component of such a star and its mass-loss rate. It will also give us a chance to determine the energy of the pulsar wind and to study the details of shock acceleration happening in the system. With this proposal we ask for 23 Swift observations, 5 ksec each, spread all over the year with a more dense pattern close to the periastron passage.

1316119 / TYLER PRITCHARD / SWINBURNE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

"DEEPER, WIDER, FASTER: HIGH ENERGY COUNTERPARTS TO THE FASTEST BURSTS IN THE SKY"

Transient astrophysical phenomena have been continuously discovered as new timescales have been probed. For example, fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been discovered on millisecond timescales, which are likely extragalactic in origin but whose physical mechanisms are currently unknown. In addition, minutes-to-hours time sampling have discovered optical counterparts to γ-ray bursts that once would have been thought to be optically dark . Furthermore, supernova discovery programs are pushing to shorter and shorter cadences in an effort to discover new transients such as kilonovae and supernovae shock breakouts. We propose to use Swift to help identify high energy counterparts to FRBs and other fast optical transients discovered as part of this ongoing simultaneous multi-wavelength survey.

1316125 / DENNIS BODEWITS / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK)

"ROTATION AND CHEMICAL HETEROGENEITY OF COMET 41P/TUTTLE-GIACOBINI-KRESAK"

We propose to use Swift-UVOT to measure rotational variations of the gas and dust surrounding comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak. We will derive prime rotational properties from continuum observations and will look for evidence of that variability in the production rate and mixing ratio measurements of OH, CN, and other volatiles. Observing from space, Swift is unhindered by day-night aliasing, permitting unrivaled temporal coverage of this comet. The close proximity of the comet combined with UVOT s large field of view and its UV imaging and spectroscopy capabilities will allow for a very sensitive rotational study of the inner coma. Our results will represent a unique contribution to the anticipated worldwide observing campaign and, coupled with observations from the ground.

1316128 / ROBERTO SORIA / CURTIN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

"TESTING A PRECESSION MODEL FOR THE NEUTRON STAR ULX P13"

ULX P13 in NGC7793 (L_X ~ 10^{40} erg/s) harbours a neutron star accreting at highly super-Eddington rates. This ULX is unique in: i) having a bright B9Ia mass donor star periodically heated by the X-ray source in a 64-d eccentric orbit; and ii) exhibiting optical lightcurve shifts and X-ray dim states best explained by a 7-yr super-orbital precession (either of the disk or of the spin axis). P13 is thus the best candidate to test how emerging X-rays vary both in flux and spectrum with viewing angle in ULXs. We propose to monitor the X-ray flux with the XRT and the irradiating flux seen by the B9Ia star with the UVOT (u). We predict that P13 will return to a dim state (emitting away from our line of sight) during Cycle 13; we will use the XRT to trigger our approved ToO XMM observation.

1316134 / NATHALIE DEGENAAR / UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

"THE NATURE AND ACCRETION FLOW PROPERTIES OF SUB-LUMINOUS X-RAY BINARIES"

Very-faint X-ray transients undergo outbursts of accretion with a peak X-ray luminosity much lower than that of other black hole and neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. Studying these objects is of great interest because they trace a poorly understood accretion regime and may represent a missing population of short-period binaries or neutron stars with relatively strong magnetic fields. To study the outburst of a very-faint X-ray transient in detail, we propose 30 ks of Swift ToO monitoring observations (30x1 ks every other day), and 10 hr of deep VLA radio observations (1x4 hr and 1x6 hr). Complemented by guaranteed-time optical and near-infrared monitoring with Faulkes+SMARTS, these data allow us to investigate the nature of the binary and the properties of the accretion in/out flow.

1316135 / BRADFORD WARGELIN / SMITHSONIAN ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY

"PROXIMA CENTAURI'S STELLAR CYCLE"

15 years of ASAS V-band monitoring have yielded strong evidence for a 7-year stellar cycle in Proxima Cen (dM5.5e), which is very exciting because standard models say that fully convective stars cannot support solar-like magnetic activity cycles. We have also shown that 4 years of Swift XRT and UVOT observations are consistent with the optical cycle, and opposite in phase. X-ray/UV rotational modulation likewise appears to have opposite phase from the 83-day optical period, but this is less secure. We request ten 3.5-ks observations with ~8-day spacing to confirm the X-ray cyclical and rotational modulations. Prox Cen is the only late-type M star practical for such studies and Swift is the X-ray mission best suited to monitor this flare star, which also hosts the nearest exoplanet.

1316144 / JAMES NEILL / CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

"ROBOTIC SPECTROSCOPIC FOLLOWUP OF SWIFT GRBS"

We propose rapid and robotic multicolor imaging and spectroscopy of GRB afterglows on the Palomar 60-inch telescope. Robotic spectroscopy is available on the newly commissioned Spectral Energy Distribution Machine (a low resolution integral field spectrograph). Our annual yield is expected to be ten multi-band photometric observations and five redshifts. We will disseminate these findings quickly and thereby enable wider follow up of SWIFT bursts. The goals of our group are are: (i) provide automated, rapid spectroscopy enabling immediate redshift measurement and sensitive constraints on the color evolution of GRBs; (ii) rapidly identify high-redshift and dust-obscured GRBs; (iii) identify reverse shocks and constrain energetics of GRBs; (iv) collect unbiased samples for demographic study.

1316152 / NATHANIEL BUTLER / ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

"GRB AND GRAVITATIONAL WAVE FOLLOWUP WITH RATIR AND THE DDOTI"

The Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, mounted on an autonomous 1.5m Telescope at SPM, is a highly-unique facility for Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) research. It is 100% time-dedicated to the followup of Swift GRBs and is often the world's only facility capturing light curve data at both early times (t<1 day) and routinely at late times, with the addition of simultaneous optical and NIR coverage. We highlight key RATIR results as well as prospects for the near future. With modest support requested for nightly monitoring and equipment upgrades, we hope to continue our GRB program and to also support Swift gravitational wave followup. We offer to extend the RATIR software to support a new program at SPM -- the DDOTI -- to chase gravitational waves with in tandem with RATIR.

1316155 / MISSAGH MEHDIPOUR / SRON NETHERLANDS INSTITUTE FOR SPACE RESEARCH

"CONTINUING THE SEARCH FOR X-RAY OBSCURING DISK WINDS IN AGN"

The recently discovered X-ray obscuring outflow in NGC 5548 is remarkably different from the commonly seen ionised outflows in AGN. It exhibits large columns of cold, high-velocity gas, close to the black hole. It produces broad UV absorption lines and shields much of the ionising radiation. This has important implications for the launching mechanism of the outflows. The extraordinary NGC 5548 finding was only made possible by combining the unique capabilities of Swift, XMM-Newton, HST and NuSTAR. We propose to extend our investigation to a sample of 8 suitable AGN to broaden our understanding of this phenomenon. We request weekly Swift monitoring of them in order to trigger joint XMM-Newton/HST/NuSTAR ToO observations (already approved). In total 96 ks of Swift time is requested.

1316157 / MANSI KASLIWAL / CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

"UNDERSTANDING YOUNG SUPERNOVAE & EXOTIC TRANSIENTS WITH SWIFT AND ZTF"

The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) is poised to open a new window into time-domain astronomy with its survey speed of 3750 sq deg per hour to 20.4 mag; we are on-schedule to begin commissioning April 2017 and the survey in October 2017. Building on our PTF/iPTF legacy, we are preparing even faster cadence and even more rapid follow-up. Here, we propose to continue our very productive Swift-PTF program into the ZTF era focusing on extremely young supernovae and relativistic explosions. UV observations have proved to be of unique value for the youngest supernovae. X-ray observations have played a key role in both identifying and understanding non-thermal sources. This program will be complemented by our NSF-funded PIRE GROWTH global network (Palomar, Keck, Gemini, HCT, NOT, DCT and EVLA).

1316173 / ZOLTAN HAIMAN / COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

"TESTING THE ORIGIN OF PERIODICITY FOR THE BINARY CANDIDATE QUASAR PG1302-102"

Quasar PG1302 exhibits periodic variability in optical bands and was identified as a subparsec supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) candidate. If PG1302 consists of an unequal mass SMBHB, the relativistic motion of the secondary black hole will inevitably lead to strong Doppler boosting of the luminosity of the source, even if the rest-frame luminosity is constant. This model can successfully explain the sinusoidal variability in optical and UV bands. However, the UV light curve is quite sparse and additional follow-up observations are necessary. We propose to monitor PG1302 with the UVOT and the XRT to further test the relativistic beaming hypothesis in UV and, for the first time, extend the test in the X-rays.

1316180 / AMANPREET KAUR / CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

"HUNTING HIGH REDSHIFT BLAZARS WITH SWIFT AND SARA-CT"

The class of AGNs called blazars, are prominent members of Fermi detected sources. The study of blazar evolution with redshift is important in its own right, but, perhaps more importantly they provide a powerful diagnostic tool to study the evolution of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL). Using blazars as cosmological probes requires knowledge of their redshift. We propose to jointly use Swift-UVOT and SARA-CT, a 0.65 m telescope at Cerro Tololo, Chile to derive photometric redshifts for sources above z ~ 1.3. This method makes use of 10 UV-optical filters, which allows for reliable redshift measurements. This project will deliver measurements of the Spectral Energy Distributions for 14 new 3FGL blazars and establish photometric redshifts for those with z > 1.3

1316181 / PETER BROWN / TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

"TEMPLATE OBSERVATIONS TO COMPLETE SWIFT SUPERNOVAE"

The Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) has revolutionized the understanding of supernova (SN) behavior in the ultraviolet (UV). Swift has observed over 460 SNe, including examples of all major classes and most subtypes. Much of the original SN photometry is contaminated by the underlying host galaxy light. We propose reobserving the host galaxies of about 65 Swift supernovae to obtain SN-free measurements of the host galaxy flux at the SN position. This will improve the accuracy and usefulness of the SN photometry already obtained, which very importantly, allows us to determine the observational and physical properties of just the SNe themselves.

1316192 / IAIR ARCAVI / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (SANTA BARBARA)

"TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS - A WINDOW TO QUIESCENT SUPER-MASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND ACCRETION PHYSICS"

The search for the tidal disruption of stars by super-massive black holes is yielding exciting results. We are now able to identify these tidal disruption events (TDEs) in real-time transient surveys. UV observations are critical for obtaining the full SED of the flares, while X-ray and radio observations constrain any non-thermal emission and possible connections to high-energy TDE variants. We are running the first TDE-optimized transient survey which will substantially increase the TDE discovery rate. We aim to use Swift and JVLA ToO observations to study the emission of 3 new TDEs. These observations, together with our optical campaign, will map the full emission properties of TDEs - a crucial step towards developing TDEs into unique tools for studying otherwise quiescent black holes.

1316198 / FIONA HARRISON / CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

"SWIFT MONITORING OF NEUTRON STAR POWERED ULTRA-LUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES"

Following a series of remarkable recent discoveries, we now know that some of the most luminous members of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) population are actually powered by highly super-Eddington neutron star accretors. Three such systems are now known: M82 X-2, NGC 7793 P13, and NGC 5907 ULX1. Here we propose ∼weekly Swift monitoring of the latter two of these systems, which are sufficiently isolated for Swift to provide robust fluxes, across the full visibility window available for each source in the upcoming cycle. These observations will help to reveal the nature and physical properties of the most extreme accretors known.

1316208 / MARIANNE VESTERGAARD / UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

"EFFECTS OF THE QUASAR SED ON BLACK HOLE MASS AND DISK WINDS"

We ask for follow-up observations of 19 quasars with existing short Swift observations so to ensure a 3-4.5 sigma detection of the X-ray flux. These objects are part of a larger study of z~2 quasars. These additional data will, in combination with Danish Swift time, complete our catalog with 85 XRT-detected quasars. By combining Swift data with available radio maps and high-quality restframe UV-optical VLT spectra, we will study how the ionizing spectral energy distribution affects the shape of the broad emission lines and thereby the black hole mass estimates in distant quasars. This study will also test recently proposed hypotheses of what determines the shape of broad emission lines and that intrinsic absorption lines take origin in quasar disk winds.

1316216 / ALAN MARSCHER / BOSTON UNIVERSITY

"RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN X-RAY FLARES AND OPTICAL POLARIZATION SPECTRA OF BLAZARS"

Recent observations have uncovered a possible relationship between the optical polarized flux spectrum and high-energy flares in blazars. The investigators propose to explore this connection through Swift monitoring of the optical-UV and X-ray flux of blazars simultaneous with measurements of 4-color optical total and polarized flux spectra. Resulting correlations or non-correlations of the optical polarized flux spectral index with X-ray flares will test mechanisms for acceleration of high-energy electrons involved in synchrotron X-ray and very high-energy gamma-ray flares.

1316225 / JEROEN HOMAN / MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

"SWIFT COVERAGE OF A FULL STATE-TRANSITION CYCLE IN 4U 1636-536"

With its flexible monitoring capabilities and broad spectral coverage provided by the UVOT, XRT, and BAT, Swift is in a unique position to provide new insights into the nature of spectral states in X-ray binaries and the transitions between them. Here we propose to cover a full state-transition cycle of the neutron-star LMXB 4U 1636-536. Our main focus lies on the following two aspects: 1) the evolution of the boundary layer and accretion disk components across state transitions and 2) changes in the efficiency of X-ray reprocessing between different spectral states. We request 33 monitoring observations (3 ks each, total ~100 ks) over a period of 100 days. This allows us, for the first time, to cover in detail a complete state-transition cycle in an X-ray binary with Swift.

1316232 / JOHN HUGHES / RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

"X-RAY CONFIRMATION OF CANDIDATE PLANCK CLUSTERS WITH SWIFT"

We propose a novel use of Swift: the confirmation of a large, all-sky sample of Planck cluster candidates through the detection of extended X-ray emission using the X-ray Telescope. The unconfirmed Planck clusters were selected through the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect. A good fraction are likely to be at redshifts of 0.5 or beyond and are predicted to be among the most massive clusters in the Universe. The proposed subsample of 133 candidates were selected for optimal detection by Swift. In addition to confirming the clusters, the Swift observations will provide accurate cluster positions and X-ray fluxes, that, in conjunction with our on-going ground-based optical studies, will allow for an independent mass estimate based on X-ray luminosity.