The Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory

Swift Cycle 16 Results

The lists below contain the proposals recommended by the Cycle 16 Peer Review panel. Note that in addition to the accepted programs below, ToO requests for exceptional transients will continue to be possible through the Swift ToO web site, even for ToOs not accepted into the GI Program. The decision on whether or not to observe a ToO of either category will be made by the Swift Principal Investigator.

PIs of Cycle 16 proposals for observation: Please note that the ROSES 2019 Appendix D.5 "Swift Guest Investigator Cycle 16" states:

"It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator (PI) of an accepted ToO to alert the Swift Observatory Duty Scientist when trigger conditions for their accepted ToO have been met. This is done through the Swift ToO Request Form at https://www.swift.psu.edu/toop/too.php. If you have trouble submitting this form please email swiftods@swift.psu.edu.

"ToO proposals must have an astrophysical trigger. Once the trigger criteria have been met for an approved target, the PI should check if the target location is more than five hours in RA from the Sun and more than 20 degrees from the Moon before requesting Swift observations (http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Tools/Viewing.html)."

"Accepted Cycle 16 ToO proposals may be triggered until March 31, 2021."

Jump to:

Recommended Proposals

Prop    PI              	Title

1619001 LYUTIKOV                THE ORIGIN OF PLATEAUS AND OF THE SUDDEN STEEP DECAYS IN GRB AFTERGLOW
1619013 YOUNGBLOOD              DEFINING THE ENERGY BUDGET FOR ABIOGENISIS ON M-DWARF PLANETS
1619018 PARIKH                  INVESTIGATING THE UNEXPLAINED SHALLOW HEAT SOURCE IN NEUTRON STAR CRUSTS
1619021 KENNEA                  SWIFT LOCALIZATION OF MAXI DISCOVERED GALACTIC X-RAY TRANSIENTS
1619027 KENNEA                  RAPID SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OF FAST RADIO BURSTS
1619028 GREGOIRE                SEARCHING FOR HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO SOURCES WITH SWIFT
1619029 GRUPE                   CATCHING AGN IN EXTREME X-RAY AND UV FLUX STATES
1619032 METZGER                 ORIGIN OF EARLY UV EMISSION FROM BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS
1619038 BOGDANOV                SWIFT MONITORING OF NEARBY X-RAY BINARY-RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR TRANSITION OBJECTS
1619042 HENZE                   PROBING THE ERUPTION STATISTICS AND EVOLUTION OF THE UNIQUE RECURRENT NOVA M31N 2008-12A
1619044 SATALECKA               OBSERVATIONS OF THE MULTIMESSENGER BLAZAR TXS 0506+056 WITH SWIFT, NUSTAR AND MAGIC
1619050 BROWN                   SWIFT AND SIRAH: UV TO NIR OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE\\ BEYOND THE TWILIGHT ZONE
1619053 DEGENAAR                SWIFT/VLA MONITORING OF THE DECAY OF A GIANT BE/X-RAY BINARY OUTBURST
1619061 VAN DEN EIJNDEN         THE NATURE AND ACCRETION FLOW PROPERTIES OF SUB-LUMINOUS X-RAY BINARIES
1619062 MEHDIPOUR               CHASING OBSCURING WINDS WITH SWIFT
1619069 DEGENAAR                CONTINUING A SWIFT LEGACY: THE MONITORING CAMPAIGN OF THE GALACTIC CENTER
1619076 GODET                   VERIFYING THE RATE AT WHICH THE INTERMEDIATE MASS BLACK HOLE HLX-1 BECOMES UNBOUND FROM
                                ITS COMPANION
1619083 VESTERGAARD             MONITORING THE SLEEPING MONSTER IN AGN MRK 590 AND CLUES TO THE NATURE OF ITS RADIO EMISSION
1619085 HOLWERDA                A SWIFT DEEP/WIDE SURVEY
1619088 GEZARI                  SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OF INFANT TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS IN ZTF: BUILDING A LEGACY SAMPLE
1619091 RICCI                   UNDERSTANDING THE ORIGIN OF THE NUCLEAR RADIO EMISSION IN RADIO-QUIET AGN
1619095 WALTON                  THE HUNT FOR NEW PULSAR ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES
1619102 FOLEY                   PROBING THE PROGENITOR METALLICITY OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE WITH EARLY-TIME UV SPECTROSCOPY
1619105 KENNEA                  KEY PROJECT: THE DETECTION AND MONITORING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC COUNTERPARTS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE
                                SOURCES WITH SWIFT
1619106 MCHARDY                 THE X-RAY/RADIO LINK IN RADIO-QUIET AGN
1619108 VASILOPOULOS            EXPLORING THE PROLONGED LOW FLUX STATE OF NGC 300 ULX1
1619109 VALENTI                 HIGH CADENCE UV LIGHT CURVES OF EXTREMELY YOUNG SUPERNOVAE
1619110 AYDI                    IN SEARCH OF SHOCKS: MONITORING NOVAE WITH SWIFT
1619117 CORSI                   A SEARCH FOR BL-IC SNE WITH X-RAY AFTERGLOWS USING ZTF+SWIFT
1619120 AYALA SOLARES           SWIFT FOLLOW-UP SEARCHES OF COINCIDENCES FROM THE AMON NEUTRINO + GAMMA-RAY PROGRAM
1619121 BODEWITS                RAPID FOLLOW UP CHARACTERIZATION OF COMETARY OUTBURST EJECTA
1619122 HOLOIEN                 EARLY-TIME UVOT AND XRT FOLLOW-UP OF BRIGHT TDES DETECTED BY ASAS-SN
1619126 KAUR                    CLASSIFICATION OF NEW X-RAY COUNTERPARTS FOR FERMI UNASSOCIATED GAMMA RAY SOURCES USING
                                SWIFT ARCHIVAL DATA
1619130 TERRERAN                EXPLOSION MECHANISMS AND ENERGY SOURCES POWERING SUPER-LUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE
1619132 WARGELIN                PROXIMA CENTAURI'S STELLAR CYCLE
1619136 MOLINA                  A STATISTICAL APPROACH TO STAR FORMATION AND QUENCHING IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE
1619139 RIVERA SANDOVAL         UNDERSTANDING THE ORIGIN OF FAST-EVOLVING LUMINOUS TRANSIENTS
1619141 EARNSHAW                UNDERSTANDING EXTREME ULX VARIABILITY: NGC 925 ULX-3
1619144 TOMSICK                 TOO OBSERVATION OF GRBS DETECTED WITH THE COSI BALLOON PAYLOAD
1619146 CHARLTON                UV/X-RAY MONITORING OF ACCRETION STATE TRANSITIONS IN A FADING QUASAR
1619148 RAJAGOPAL               HUNTING HIGH REDSHIFT BLAZARS WITH SWIFT AND SARA-CT/ORM
1619152 PRITCHARD               MULTI-WAVELENGTHCHARACTERIZATION OF YOUNG FAST EVOLVING TRANSIENTS FOR LSST AND BEYOND
1619170 SANTANDER               THE NEUTRINO/BLAZAR COSMIC GAMES: IC170922A AND TXS 0506+056, WHAT NEXT?


Recommended Targets

Definition of Columns

  1. Proposal: Proposal number assigned by Swift mission
  2. PI: Principal Investigator's last name
  3. Target_Num: Target number as listed on the proposal form
  4. Target_Name: Target name as listed on proposal forms
  5. Time: Total observing time approved, in ksec
  6. ToO: "Y" if Target of Opportunity proposal, otherwise "N"
  7. RA: Right Ascension (equinox J2000) in degrees
  8. Dec: Declination (equinox J2000) in degrees


Prop   |PI             |Target_Num|Target_Name         |Time [ ks ]|TOO|RA [ deg ]|Dec [ deg ]|
1619013|YOUNGBLOOD     |  1       |AU MIC              | 52.00	   |N  |311.28971 |-31.34089  |
1619018|PARIKH         |  1       |TRANSIENTNS1        | 48.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619021|KENNEA         |  1       |MAXI TRANSIENT #1   |  1.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619021|KENNEA         |  2       |MAXI TRANSIENT #2   |  1.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619021|KENNEA         |  3       |MAXI TRANSIENT #3   |  1.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619021|KENNEA         |  4       |MAXI TRANSIENT #4   |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619021|KENNEA         |  5       |MAXI TRANSIENT #5   |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619021|KENNEA         |  6       |MAXI TRANSIENT #6   |  3.50	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619021|KENNEA         |  7       |MAXI TRANSIENT #7   |  9.50	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         |  1       |FRB 1               |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         |  2       |FRB 2               |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         |  3       |FRB 3               |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         |  4       |FRB 4               |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         |  5       |FRB 5               |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         |  6       |FRB 6               |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         |  7       |FRB 7               |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         |  8       |FRB 8               |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         |  9       |FRB 9               |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619027|KENNEA         | 10       |FRB 10              |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       |  1       |NEUTRINO-1 MOSAIC   |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       |  2       |NEUTRINO-2 MOSAIC   |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       |  3       |NEUTRINO-3 MOSAIC   |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       |  4       |NEUTRINO-4 MOSAIC   |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       |  5       |NEUTRINO-5 MOSAIC   |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       |  6       |NEUTRINO-6 MOSAIC   |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       |  7       |NEUTRINO-7 MOSAIC   |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       |  8       |NEUTRINO-8 MOSAIC   |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       |  9       |NEUTRINO-9 MOSAIC   |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       | 10       |NEUTRINO-10 MOSAIC  |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       | 11       |NEUTRINO-11 MOSAIC  |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       | 12       |NEUTRINO-12 MOSAIC  |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       | 13       |SOURCE 1            |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       | 14       |SOURCE 2            |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       | 15       |SOURCE 3            |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       | 16       |SOURCE 4            |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619028|GREGOIRE       | 17       |SOURCE 5            |  2.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619029|GRUPE          |  1       |ESO 242-G8          |  1.00	   |N  |  6.25083 |-45.49278  |
1619029|GRUPE          |  2       |TON S 180           |  1.00	   |N  | 14.33417 |-22.38250  |
1619029|GRUPE          |  3       |QSO 0056-36         |  1.00	   |N  | 14.65583 |-36.10139  |
1619029|GRUPE          |  4       |RX J0100-5113       |  1.00	   |N  | 15.11292 |-51.23167  |
1619029|GRUPE          |  5       |RX J0105.6-1416     |  1.00	   |N  | 16.41167 |-14.27056  |
1619029|GRUPE          |  6       |RX J0117-3826       |  1.00	   |N  | 19.37750 |-38.44167  |
1619029|GRUPE          |  7       |MS 0117-28          |  1.00	   |N  | 19.89875 |-28.35889  |
1619029|GRUPE          |  8       |RX J0128.1-1848     |  1.00	   |N  | 22.02792 |-18.80861  |
1619029|GRUPE          |  9       |IRAS F01267-217     |  1.00	   |N  | 22.29458 |-21.69917  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 10       |RX J0134.2-4258     |  1.00	   |N  | 23.57042 |-42.97417  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 11       |RX J0136.9-3510     |  1.00	   |N  | 24.22667 |-35.16444  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 12       |RX J0148.3-2758     |  1.00	   |N  | 27.09292 |-27.97389  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 13       |RX J0152.4-2319     |  1.00	   |N  | 28.11292 |-23.33167  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 14       |MKN 1044            |  1.00	   |N  | 37.52292 | -8.99806  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 15       |MKN 1048            |  1.00	   |N  | 38.65750 | -8.78778  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 16       |RX J0311.3-2046     |  1.00	   |N  | 47.82833 |-20.77194  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 17       |RX J0319.8-2627     |  1.00	   |N  | 49.95292 |-26.45333  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 18       |RX J0323.2-4931     |  1.00	   |N  | 50.81583 |-49.51972  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 19       |ESO 301-G13         |  1.00	   |N  | 51.26042 |-41.90500  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 20       |VCV 0331-37         |  1.00	   |N  | 53.41750 |-37.11528  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 21       |RX J0349.1-4711     |  1.00	   |N  | 57.28208 |-47.18444  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 22       |FAIRALL 1116        |  1.00	   |N  | 57.92375 |-40.46667  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 23       |FAIRALL 1119        |  1.00	   |N  | 61.25708 |-37.18750  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 24       |RX J0412.7-4712     |  1.00	   |N  | 63.17292 |-47.21278  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 25       |1H 0419-577         |  1.00	   |N  | 66.50292 |-57.20056  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 26       |FAIRALL 303         |  1.00	   |N  | 67.66667 |-53.61556  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 27       |RX J0437.4-4711     |  1.00	   |N  | 69.36750 |-47.19167  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 28       |RX J0439.6-5311     |  1.00	   |N  | 69.91125 |-53.19194  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 29       |1H 0439-272         |  1.00	   |N  | 70.34375 |-27.13889  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 30       |1 ES 0614-584       |  1.00	   |N  | 93.95667 |-58.43500  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 31       |RX J0859.0+4846     |  1.00	   |N  |134.76208 | 48.76917  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 32       |RX J0902.5-0700     |  1.00	   |N  |135.64000 | -7.00111  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 33       |MKN 110             |  1.00	   |N  |141.30417 | 52.28667  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 34       |PG 0953+414         |  1.00	   |N  |149.21833 | 41.25611  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 35       |RX J1005.7+4332     |  1.00	   |N  |151.42458 | 43.54472  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 36       |RX J1007.1+2203     |  1.00	   |N  |151.79250 | 22.05056  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 37       |CBS 126             |  1.00	   |N  |153.26250 | 35.85667  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 38       |HS 1019+37          |  1.00	   |N  |154.75208 | 37.87806  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 39       |MKN 141             |  1.00	   |N  |154.80250 | 63.96750  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 40       |MKN 142             |  1.00	   |N  |156.38042 | 51.67639  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 41       |RX J1034.6+3938     |  1.00	   |N  |158.66083 | 39.64111  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 42       |RX J1117.1+6522     |  1.00	   |N  |169.29208 | 65.36861  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 43       |PG 1115+407         |  1.00	   |N  |169.62667 | 40.43194  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 44       |TON 1388            |  1.00	   |N  |169.78625 | 21.32167  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 45       |EXO 1128+69         |  1.00	   |N  |172.77000 | 68.86472  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 46       |2B 1128+31          |  1.00	   |N  |172.78958 | 31.23500  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 47       |SBS 1136+579        |  1.00	   |N  |174.70667 | 57.71222  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 48       |Z 1136+3412         |  1.00	   |N  |174.80792 | 33.93083  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 49       |WAS 26              |  1.00	   |N  |175.31750 | 21.93917  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 50       |CASG 855            |  1.00	   |N  |176.12458 | 36.88583  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 51       |MKN 1310            |  1.00	   |N  |180.31000 | -3.67806  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 52       |NGC 4051            |  1.00	   |N  |180.78958 | 44.53056  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 53       |GQ COMAE            |  1.00	   |N  |181.17542 | 27.90333  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 54       |RX J1209.8+3217     |  1.00	   |N  |182.43833 | 32.28389  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 55       |PG 1211+143         |  1.00	   |N  |183.57375 | 14.05361  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 56       |MKN 766             |  1.00	   |N  |184.61083 | 29.81278  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 57       |3C 273              |  1.00	   |N  |187.27792 |  2.05250  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 58       |RX J1231.6+7044     |  1.00	   |N  |187.90250 | 70.73722  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 59       |MKN 771             |  1.00	   |N  |188.01500 | 20.15833  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 60       |TON 83              |  1.00	   |N  |188.42375 | 31.01750  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 61       |MCG+08-23-067       |  1.00	   |N  |189.21333 | 45.65139  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 62       |NGC 4593            |  1.00	   |N  |189.91417 | -5.34417  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 63       |IRAS F12397+3333    |  1.00	   |N  |190.54417 | 33.28417  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 64       |PG 1244+026         |  1.00	   |N  |191.64667 |  2.36917  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 65       |RX J1304.2+0205     |  1.00	   |N  |196.07083 |  2.09361  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 66       |PG 1307+085         |  1.00	   |N  |197.44583 |  8.33000  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 67       |RX J1314.3+3429     |  1.00	   |N  |198.59458 | 34.49417  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 68       |RX J1319.9+5235     |  1.00	   |N  |199.98792 | 52.59250  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 69       |PG 1322+659         |  1.00	   |N  |200.95625 | 65.69667  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 70       |IRAS 13349+2438     |  1.00	   |N  |204.32792 | 24.38417  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 71       |TON 730             |  1.00	   |N  |205.98625 | 25.64667  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 72       |RX J1355.2+5612     |  1.00	   |N  |208.81917 | 56.21250  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 73       |PG 1402+261         |  1.00	   |N  |211.31750 | 25.92611  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 74       |RX J1413.6+7029     |  1.00	   |N  |213.40292 | 70.49722  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 75       |NGC 5548            |  1.00	   |N  |214.49583 | 25.13667  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 76       |QSO 1421-0013       |  1.00	   |N  |216.01583 | -0.44944  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 77       |MKN 813             |  1.00	   |N  |216.85417 | 19.83139  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 78       |MKN 684             |  1.00	   |N  |217.76708 | 28.28722  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 79       |MKN 478             |  1.00	   |N  |220.53125 | 35.43972  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 80       |PG 1448+273         |  1.00	   |N  |222.78667 | 27.15750  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 81       |MKN 841             |  1.00	   |N  |226.00500 | 10.43778  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 82       |SBS 1527+564        |  1.00	   |N  |232.28125 | 56.26861  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 83       |MKN 493             |  1.00	   |N  |239.79042 | 35.03000  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 84       |MKN 876             |  1.00	   |N  |243.48833 | 65.71972  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 85       |RX J1618.1+3619     |  1.00	   |N  |244.53917 | 36.33278  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 86       |KUG 1618+40         |  1.00	   |N  |244.96375 | 40.98000  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 87       |PG 1626+554         |  1.00	   |N  |246.98375 | 55.37556  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 88       |EXO 1627+4014       |  1.00	   |N  |247.25542 | 40.13333  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 89       |RX J1702.5+3247     |  1.00	   |N  |255.62958 | 32.78889  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 90       |II ZW 136           |  1.00	   |N  |323.11625 | 10.13889  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 91       |RX J2146.6-3051     |  1.00	   |N  |326.65000 |-30.86139  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 92       |ESO 404-G029        |  1.00	   |N  |331.93750 |-32.58361  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 93       |NGC 7214            |  1.00	   |N  |332.27917 |-27.81000  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 94       |RX J2216.8-4451     |  1.00	   |N  |334.22167 |-44.86583  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 95       |RX J2217.9-5941     |  1.00	   |N  |334.48583 |-59.69167  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 96       |PKS 2227-399        |  1.00	   |N  |337.66792 |-39.71444  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 97       |RX J2242.6-3845     |  1.00	   |N  |340.65708 |-38.75444  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 98       |RX J2245.2-4652     |  1.00	   |N  |341.33458 |-46.87000  |
1619029|GRUPE          | 99       |MS 2254-36          |  1.00	   |N  |344.41250 |-36.93528  |
1619029|GRUPE          |100       |RX J2258.7-2609     |  1.00	   |N  |344.68917 |-26.15389  |
1619029|GRUPE          |101       |RX J2301.6-5913     |  1.00	   |N  |345.40083 |-59.22222  |
1619029|GRUPE          |102       |RX J2301.8-5508     |  1.00	   |N  |345.46667 |-55.14194  |
1619029|GRUPE          |103       |RX J2304.6-3501     |  1.00	   |N  |346.15542 |-35.02028  |
1619029|GRUPE          |104       |RX J2312.5-3404     |  1.00	   |N  |348.14500 |-34.07222  |
1619029|GRUPE          |105       |RX J2317.8-4422     |  1.00	   |N  |349.45792 |-44.37444  |
1619029|GRUPE          |106       |RX J2325.2-3236     |  1.00	   |N  |351.29917 |-32.60972  |
1619029|GRUPE          |107       |IRAS F23226-3843    |  1.00	   |N  |351.35083 |-38.44694  |
1619029|GRUPE          |108       |MS 23409-1511       |  1.00	   |N  |355.86917 |-14.92500  |
1619029|GRUPE          |109       |RX J2349.4-3126     |  1.00	   |N  |357.35042 |-31.43417  |
1619029|GRUPE          |110       |AM 2354-304         |  1.00	   |N  |359.36667 |-30.46111  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       |  1       |PSR J1023+0038      |  4.00	   |N  |155.94871 |  0.64475  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       |  2       |XSS J12270-4859     |  4.00	   |N  |186.99475 |-48.89522  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       |  3       |PSR J1723-2837      |  4.00	   |N  |260.84658 |-28.63253  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       |  4       |PSR J1628-3205      |  4.00	   |N  |247.02925 |-32.09686  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       |  5       |PSR J2129-0429      |  4.00	   |N  |322.43750 | -4.48489  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       |  6       |PSR J1816+4510      |  4.00	   |N  |274.14971 | 45.17608  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       |  7       |PSR J2215+5135      |  4.00	   |N  |333.88617 | 51.59347  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       |  8       |PSR J2339-0533      |  4.00	   |N  |354.91146 | -5.55147  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       |  9       |1FGL J0523.5-2529   |  4.00	   |N  | 80.82050 |-25.46025  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       | 10       |PSR J1417-4402      |  4.00	   |N  |214.37750 |-44.04925  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       | 11       |3FGL J1544.6-1125   |  4.00	   |N  |236.16408 |-11.46786  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       | 12       |3FGL J0427.9-6704   |  4.00	   |N  | 66.95671 |-67.07639  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       | 13       |PSR J1048+2339      |  4.00	   |N  |162.18088 | 23.66483  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       | 14       |3FGL J0212.1+5320   |  4.00	   |N  | 33.04358 | 23.66483  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       | 15       |3FGL J0744.1-2523   |  4.00	   |N  |116.03529 |-25.39969  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       | 16       |3FGL J0838.8-2829   |  4.00	   |N  |129.71021 |-28.46594  |
1619038|BOGDANOV       | 17       |3FGL J2039.6-5618   |  4.00	   |N  |309.89579 |-56.28583  |
1619042|HENZE          |  1       |M31N 2008-12A       | 84.00	   |Y  | 11.37037 | 41.90283  |
1619044|SATALECKA      |  1       |TXS 0506+056        |110.00	   |N  | 77.35817 |  5.69314  |
1619050|BROWN          |  1       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_1      | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          |  2       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_2      | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          |  3       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_3      | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          |  4       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_4      | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          |  5       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_5      | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          |  6       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_6      | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          |  7       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_7      | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          |  8       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_8      | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          |  9       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_9      | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 10       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_10     | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 11       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_11     | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 12       |SN_IA_LOWERZ_12     | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 13       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_1     | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 14       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_2     | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 15       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_3     | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 16       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_4     | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 17       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_5     | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 18       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_6     | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 19       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_7     | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 20       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_8     | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 21       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_9     | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 22       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_10    | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 23       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_11    | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619050|BROWN          | 24       |SN_IA_HIGHERZ_12    | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619053|DEGENAAR       |  1       |TRANSIENT BEXRB     | 20.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619061|VAN DEN EIJNDEN|  1       |VFXT                | 30.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619062|MEHDIPOUR      |  1       |ARK 564             | 15.00	   |N  |340.66379 | 29.72544  |
1619062|MEHDIPOUR      |  2       |MR 2251-178         | 14.00	   |N  |343.52417 |-17.58194  |
1619062|MEHDIPOUR      |  3       |MRK 509             | 12.00	   |N  |311.04071 |-10.72344  |
1619062|MEHDIPOUR      |  4       |MRK 841             | 15.00	   |N  |226.00487 | 10.43792  |
1619062|MEHDIPOUR      |  5       |NGC 3227            | 14.00	   |N  |155.87742 | 19.86506  |
1619062|MEHDIPOUR      |  6       |NGC 4593            | 14.00	   |N  |189.91454 | -5.34422  |
1619062|MEHDIPOUR      |  7       |NGC 7469            | 14.00	   |N  |345.81529 |  8.87369  |
1619069|DEGENAAR       |  1       |GALACTIC CENTER     |490.00	   |N  |266.40000 |-28.98333  |
1619076|GODET          |  1       |ESO243-49           | 60.00	   |N  | 17.61792 |-46.07286  |
1619083|VESTERGAARD    |  1       |MRK 590             | 48.00	   |N  | 33.63992 | -0.76675  |
1619085|HOLWERDA       |  1       |CDFS                |160.00	   |N  | 53.11667 |-27.80083  |
1619088|GEZARI         |  1       |ZTF_TDE1            | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619088|GEZARI         |  2       |ZTF_TDE2            | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619088|GEZARI         |  3       |ZTF_TDE3            | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619088|GEZARI         |  4       |ZTF_TDE4            | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619088|GEZARI         |  5       |ZTF_TDE5            | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619088|GEZARI         |  6       |ZTF_TDE6            | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619088|GEZARI         |  7       |ZTF_TDE7            | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619088|GEZARI         |  8       |ZTF_TDE8            | 30.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619088|GEZARI         |  9       |ZTF_TDE9            | 30.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619088|GEZARI         | 10       |ZTF_TDE10           | 30.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619091|RICCI          |  1       |IC 4329A            |100.00	   |N  |207.33029 |-30.30944  |
1619095|WALTON         |  1       |NGC 891 ULX         | 10.00	   |N  | 35.63917 | 42.34081  |
1619095|WALTON         |  2       |NGC2403 ULX2        | 25.00	   |N  |114.20833 | 65.60083  |
1619102|FOLEY          |  1       |SNIA                | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619102|FOLEY          |  2       |SNIA                | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619102|FOLEY          |  3       |SNIA                | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619102|FOLEY          |  4       |SNIA                | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619102|FOLEY          |  5       |SNIA                | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619102|FOLEY          |  6       |SNIA                | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619105|KENNEA         |  1       |GW EM CANDIDATE #1  | 70.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619105|KENNEA         |  2       |GW EM CANDIDATE #2  | 70.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619105|KENNEA         |  3       |GW EM CANDIDATE #3  | 70.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619106|MCHARDY        |  1       |MCG+08-11-11        | 82.00	   |N  | 88.72338 | 46.43933  |
1619106|MCHARDY        |  2       |MCG+08-11-11        | 78.00	   |N  | 88.72338 | 46.43933  |
1619106|MCHARDY        |  3       |NGC 4151            | 88.00	   |N  |182.63575 | 39.40572  |
1619106|MCHARDY        |  4       |NGC 7469            | 82.00	   |N  |345.81508 |  8.87400  |
1619106|MCHARDY        |  5       |NGC 5548            | 88.00	   |N  |214.49804 | 25.13678  |
1619108|VASILOPOULOS   |  1       |NGC 300 ULX-1       | 88.00	   |N  | 13.76900 |-37.69631  |
1619109|VALENTI        |  1       |DLT_1               | 36.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619109|VALENTI        |  2       |DLT_2               | 36.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619109|VALENTI        |  3       |DLT_3               | 36.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619109|VALENTI        |  4       |DLT_4               | 36.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619109|VALENTI        |  5       |DLT_5               | 36.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619110|AYDI           |  1       |TOO NOVA 1          | 80.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619110|AYDI           |  2       |TOO NOVA 2          | 80.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619117|CORSI          |  1       |ZTFSN1              | 15.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619117|CORSI          |  2       |ZTFSN2              | 15.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619117|CORSI          |  3       |ZTFSN1              | 15.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619120|AYALA SOLARES  |  1       |ANT_FERMI_ALERT     |  7.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619120|AYALA SOLARES  |  2       |ICECUBE FERMI ALERT |  7.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619120|AYALA SOLARES  |  3       |ICECUBE HAWC ALERT  |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619120|AYALA SOLARES  |  4       |ICECUBE SWIT ALERT  |  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619120|AYALA SOLARES  |  5       |COINCIDENCE SOURCE 1|  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619120|AYALA SOLARES  |  6       |COINCIDENCE SOURCE 2|  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619120|AYALA SOLARES  |  7       |COINCIDENCE SOURCE 3|  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619120|AYALA SOLARES  |  8       |COINCIDENCE SOURCE 4|  4.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619121|BODEWITS       |  1       |COMET1              | 15.60	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619121|BODEWITS       |  2       |COMET2              | 15.60	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619121|BODEWITS       |  3       |COMET3              | 15.60	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619122|HOLOIEN        |  1       |ASASSN-TDE-1        | 45.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619122|HOLOIEN        |  2       |ASASSN-TDE-2        | 45.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619130|TERRERAN       |  1       |SLSN1               |110.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619130|TERRERAN       |  2       |SLSN2               |110.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619132|WARGELIN       |  1       |PROXIMA CEN         | 42.00	   |N  |217.38142 |-62.67506  |
1619136|MOLINA         |  1       |NSA 076332          |  1.00	   |N  |121.17237 | 50.71850  |
1619136|MOLINA         |  2       |NSA 076332          |  1.00	   |N  |121.17237 | 50.71850  |
1619136|MOLINA         |  3       |UGC 9803            |  1.00	   |N  |229.32437 | 29.40006  |
1619136|MOLINA         |  4       |UGC 9803            |  1.00	   |N  |229.32437 | 29.40006  |
1619136|MOLINA         |  5       |KUG 0752+333        |  2.24	   |N  |119.04400 | 33.24500  |
1619136|MOLINA         |  6       |KUG 0752+333        |  2.19	   |N  |119.04400 | 33.24500  |
1619136|MOLINA         |  7       |NSA 104538          |  1.70	   |N  |203.59500 | 27.46100  |
1619136|MOLINA         |  8       |NSA 104538          |  1.67	   |N  |203.59500 | 27.46100  |
1619136|MOLINA         |  9       |PGC 60374           |  1.00	   |N  |262.25700 | 60.08900  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 10       |PGC 60374           |  1.00	   |N  |262.25700 | 60.08900  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 11       |NSA 008232          |  2.01	   |N  | 54.89200 | -0.51200  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 12       |NSA 008232          |  1.97	   |N  | 54.89200 | -0.51200  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 13       |NSA 144968          |  2.17	   |N  |215.71800 | 40.62300  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 14       |NSA 144968          |  2.13	   |N  |215.71800 | 40.62300  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 15       |ASK 531700.0        |  1.85	   |N  |182.28525 | 35.63581  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 16       |ASK 531700.0        |  1.82	   |N  |182.28525 | 35.63581  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 17       |NSA 076402          |  1.79	   |N  |122.68000 | 52.52200  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 18       |NSA 076402          |  1.66	   |N  |122.68000 | 52.52200  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 19       |NSA 033341          |  2.03	   |N  |119.22200 | 32.34600  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 20       |NSA 033341          |  1.87	   |N  |119.22200 | 32.34600  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 21       |NSA 046121          |  1.00	   |N  |245.84200 | 39.21500  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 22       |NSA 046121          |  1.00	   |N  |245.84200 | 39.21500  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 23       |MCG+04-32-016       |  3.53	   |N  |204.63200 | 26.10500  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 24       |MCG+04-32-016       |  3.11	   |N  |204.63200 | 26.10500  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 25       |LEDA 1817756        |  4.05	   |N  |259.14900 | 27.22900  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 26       |LEDA 1817756        |  3.52	   |N  |259.14900 | 27.22900  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 27       |LEDA 2129757        |  4.54	   |N  |119.55300 | 38.53500  |
1619136|MOLINA         | 28       |LEDA 2129757        |  3.91	   |N  |119.55300 | 38.53500  |
1619139|RIVERA SANDOVAL|  1       |FELT1               |101.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619141|EARNSHAW       |  1       |NGC 925 ULX-3       | 67.50	   |N  | 36.83417 | 33.57028  |
1619144|TOMSICK        |  1       |COSI GRB #1         | 45.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619144|TOMSICK        |  2       |COSI GRB #2         | 45.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619146|CHARLTON       |  1       |ZTF18AAJUPNT        | 24.00	   |N  |233.28346 | 44.53567  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      |  1       |3FGL J0021.6-6835   |  2.00	   |N  |  6.02800 |-68.34850  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      |  2       |3FGL J0244.4-8224   |  2.00	   |N  | 42.78846 |-82.44144  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      |  3       |3FGL J0301.8-7157   |  2.00	   |N  | 45.41021 |-71.94289  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      |  4       |3FGL J0426.6+0459   |  2.00	   |N  | 66.57992 |  4.84047  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      |  5       |3FGL J0617.2+5701   |  2.00	   |N  | 94.32050 | 57.02122  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      |  6       |3FGL J0830.3-5855   |  2.00	   |N  |127.37987 |-58.93353  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      |  7       |3FGL J0923.1+3853   |  2.00	   |N  |140.81021 | 38.82775  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      |  8       |3FGL J1026.5+7423   |  2.00	   |N  |156.85063 | 74.47392  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      |  9       |3FGL J1207.6-2232   |  2.00	   |N  |181.90879 |-22.54750  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 10       |3FGL J1224.6+4332   |  2.00	   |N  |186.21463 | 43.58869  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 11       |3FGL J1244.8+5707   |  2.00	   |N  |191.29167 | 57.16511  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 12       |3FGL J1256.7+5328   |  2.00	   |N  |194.16096 | 53.57325  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 13       |3FGL J1549.0+6309   |  2.00	   |N  |237.48883 | 63.16869  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 14       |3FGL J1550.3+7409   |  2.00	   |N  |237.36367 | 74.15894  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 15       |3FGL J1704.0+7646   |  2.00	   |N  |255.99117 | 76.76947  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 16       |3FGL J1747.1+0139   |  2.00	   |N  |266.71879 |  1.69653  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 17       |3FGL J2132.4-5420   |  2.00	   |N  |323.03458 |-54.34347  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 18       |3FGL J2149.6+1915   |  2.00	   |N  |327.44712 | 19.34614  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 19       |3FGL J2236.2-5049   |  2.00	   |N  |339.02350 |-50.92219  |
1619148|RAJAGOPAL      | 20       |3FGL J2300.3+3136   |  2.00	   |N  |345.09508 | 30.61789  |
1619152|PRITCHARD      |  1       |TRANSIENT TOO 1     | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619152|PRITCHARD      |  2       |TRANSIENT TOO 2     | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619152|PRITCHARD      |  3       |TRANSIENT TOO 3     | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619152|PRITCHARD      |  4       |TRANSIENT TOO 4     | 10.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619170|SANTANDER      |  1       |NEUTRINO TARGET1    | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619170|SANTANDER      |  2       |NEUTRINO TARGET2    | 12.00	   |Y  |  0.00000 |  0.00000  |
1619170|SANTANDER      |  3       |FERMI J0935-0227    |  4.00     |Y  |143.85000 | -2.46000  |




Proposal Abstracts

1619001 / LYUTIKOV / PURDUE UNIVERSITY

"THE ORIGIN OF PLATEAUS AND OF THE SUDDEN STEEP DECAYS IN GRB AFTERGLOW"

Early afterglow light curves from Gamma Ray Bursts often show plateaus and sudden steep decay - nearly instantaneous drops of intensity, e.g. in the case of GRB 070110. This is not expected in the conventional fireball model, whereby the afterglow originates in an external shock. We will develop a model of GRB afterglow with the dominant contribution form the reverse shock propagating in an ultra-relativistic, highly-magnetized long-lasting winds. In the fat cooling regime the RS emissivity is approximately the wind power - this explains the plateaus. The sudden steep decay is then due to the termination of wind, e.g. due to the collapse of the central object into the black hole.

1619013 / YOUNGBLOOD / UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO

"DEFINING THE ENERGY BUDGET FOR ABIOGENISIS ON M-DWARF PLANETS"

Exoplanet atmospheres and their ability to support the development of life strongly depend on the stellar radiation environment and its variability. We propose a pilot program with the UVOT UV grism to obtain spectroscopy of flares from the young, planet-hosting M dwarf AU Mic. M dwarfs have a deficit of 200-250 nm NUV flux, which is thought to be critical for origin of life scenarios, but enhancements in flux during flares may be able to compensate for the deficit. Spectrally-resolved measurements of M dwarf NUV flares are few, and Swift is the only available observatory that can perform NUV flare spectroscopy on nearby, young, active M dwarfs. We will determine if AU Mic’s flares can accommodate several origin-of-life theories, and evaluate the utility of the UV grism for future, more

1619018 / PARIKH / UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM

"INVESTIGATING THE UNEXPLAINED SHALLOW HEAT SOURCE IN NEUTRON STAR CRUSTS"

We propose 48 ks of ToO observations, spread over 16 pointings of 3 ks each, to monitor a transient neutron star X-ray binary as it transitions from outburst to quiescence. Studying how the accretion-heated crust of the neutron star cools after an outburst yields very valuable information about its structure and nuclear reactions occurring in a neutron-rich, high density environment. Investigating how much heat is generated in the outer crustal layers requires dense coverage of the outburst decay and the first ≃50 days of cooling. Swift is the key instrument to achieve this. Our proposed observations will allow us to investigate the unexplained shallow heat source in neutron star crusts.

1619021 / KENNEA / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT LOCALIZATION OF MAXI DISCOVERED GALACTIC X-RAY TRANSIENTS"

We propose to continue the highly successful program to use Swift to localize Galactic X-ray transients discovered by MAXI, the operational phase of which has been extended until March 31, 2021. MAXI scans almost the entire X-ray sky every ~92 minutes, with a source detection sensitivity of ~60 mCrab in one orbit and ~15 mCrab in one day, discovering X-ray transients with 0.1-0.5 degree accuracies in the 2-20 keV energy band. Swift provides rapid follow-up of MAXI triggers and localization up to 1.4 error radius, which is vital for identifying any optical/radio counterpart. XRT observations will also provide measurements of the low energy X-ray spectra. UVOT data will provide astrometric corrections and possibly optical counterparts. Swift is proven to be uniquely capable in this task.

1619027 / KENNEA / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"RAPID SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OF FAST RADIO BURSTS"

We seek to quickly identify counterparts to FRBs. To date no clear counterpart has been detected at non-radio wavelengths, and the progenitor systems and emission mechanism remain unknown. New radio surveys are now on line that detect a large population of these events in real-time. We propose extremely rapid response follow-up observations with XRT and UVOT. We also propose to save the contemporaneous BAT event-by-event data when the FRB position is within the BAT FOV. This program will provide the earliest and deepest multi-wavelength constraints on non-radio emission from FRBs, as well as the greatest chance of finding a transient counterpart. This program will significantly enhance the science return of swift, and extend its transient response to help solve the mystery of FRBs.

1619028 / GREGOIRE / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"SEARCHING FOR HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO SOURCES WITH SWIFT"

In 2017, the Swift follow-up observations of an IceCube high-energy neutrino resulted in the first compelling evidence of a source of high-energy neutrinos, the flaring blazar TXS 0506+056. We propose further prompt searches for X-ray and UV/optical counterparts to IceCube high-energy likely-cosmic neutrinos with Swift. From the new IceCube Gold/Bronze alert streams, we will select 12 neutrinos with a 50% localization <0.3 to prompt a 4-pointing mosaic by Swift, providing ~50% coverage of the error region at a depth of 1ks. A total of 58ks is required including the monitoring of 5 interesting sources. Discovery of new electromagnetic counterparts to high-energy neutrinos are crucial for our understanding of the source population and revealing the origins of the highest-energy cosmic rays.

1619029 / GRUPE / MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY

"CATCHING AGN IN EXTREME X-RAY AND UV FLUX STATES"

We propose to re-observe a sample of 110 X-ray bright AGN with Swift for 1 ks each in order to to identify at least one of these AGN in an extreme X-ray flux state. This will then trigger our ongoing XMM/NuStar/HST ToO program aiming to investigate in detail the X-ray and UV spectra during extreme X-ray flux states and the drivers of their spectral complexity, including relativistically blurred reflection of X-ray photons off the accretion disk and extreme absorption events. The second goal of this proposal is to study the long-term variability of their SEDs and to study the physical conditions of extreme flux states allowing us to study how long-term variability affects important scaling relations in AGN, like correlations of AGN properties to understand the underlying physics.

1619032 / METZGER / COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

"ORIGIN OF EARLY UV EMISSION FROM BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS"

The binary neutron star (BNS) merger GW170817 was accompanied by luminous early UV emission, which may exceed that from r-process radioactive decay. We will conduct a systematic exploration of proposed origins for enhanced early-time UV emission from BNS mergers, ranging from the radioactive decay of free neutrons to ejecta re-heating by a GRB jet or wind from the magnetar remnant. Relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction between a relativistic outflow from a central engine and the ejecta will be post-processed using an r-process nuclear reaction network and radiative transfer simulation to produce a suite of theoretical UV light curves. Our results will enable UV data on BNS mergers collected by Swift UVOT to be to be translated into probes of the merger physics.

1619038 / BOGDANOV / COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT MONITORING OF NEARBY X-RAY BINARY-RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR TRANSITION OBJECTS"

The identification of three binary millisecond pulsars transforming between accreting and rotation-powered states has finally closed the evolutionary missing link between low-mass X-ray binaries and recycled pulsars. These discoveries imply that their parent population, redbacks, may also be recycled pulsars that sporadically revert to/from a low-luminosity accreting phase. We propose a Swift X-ray and UV monitoring campaign of all such nearby binary radio millisecond pulsars aimed at catching them in the act of switching to/from an accreting state. This effort would greatly aid in constraining key aspects of the poorly understood transition process of pulsars between accretion and rotation power.

1619042 / HENZE / SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY

"PROBING THE ERUPTION STATISTICS AND EVOLUTION OF THE UNIQUE RECURRENT NOVA M31N 2008-12A"

M31N 2008-12a is a recurrent nova in M31 with a unique record of 11 observed eruptions in 11 years. Its ultra-short recurrence period presents the only opportunity to study a statistically significant number of eruptions from the same system. We propose a tailored 84-ks Swift X-ray/UV observing campaign of the predicted 2020 eruption as an integral part of a long-term project. The recent 2016 eruption deviated clearly from the previous pattern, underlining the importance of obtaining multi-eruption statistics. This benchmark data set will provide unparalleled insights into binary evolution and the eruption physics that determine the observable parameters. M31N 2008-12a remains the prime candidate for the progenitor of a type Ia supernova or an accretion induced collapse to a neutron star.

1619044 / SATALECKA / DEUTSCHES ELEKTRONEN-SYNCHROTRON (DESY)

"OBSERVATIONS OF THE MULTIMESSENGER BLAZAR TXS 0506+056 WITH SWIFT, NUSTAR AND MAGIC"

There exist compelling evidence for a correlation of the high energy IceCube neutrino event IC-170922A and the blazar TXS 0506+056 observed in its flaring state by instruments spanning the whole electromagnetic spectrum. This object is up to date our best candidate for a neutrino and cosmic ray emitting source. We propose regular deep observations of the multi-messenger blazar TXS0506+056 to be preformed together by Swift, NuSTAR and MAGIC, and other MAGIC MWL partners. We ask for 22 5ks Swift observations (110ks in total) and 6 25ks NuSTAR observations (150 ks in total). The proposed Swift and NuSTAR observations are essential to characterise the X-ray emission of this source, which in turn is crucial to understand and distinguish the leptonic and hadronic processes at play.

1619050 / BROWN / TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT AND SIRAH: UV TO NIR OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE"

While Swift observations have uncovered a large diversity in the UV luminosities of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia), the physical origin of the diversity of these standard candles and the cosmological impact is still unknown. We propose to observe a sample of twenty-four Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) in the nearby Hubble flow with Swift’s Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). In coordination with the Hubble Space Telescope’s (HST) SIRAH program, these SNe will have well-measured peak absolute magnitudes encompassing the UV, optical, and near-infrared (NIR). Analysis of these observations will show whether the physical cause of the UV dispersion already observed in the UV peak magnitudes and colors also has an impact on the optical luminosities.

1619053 / DEGENAAR / UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM

"SWIFT/VLA MONITORING OF THE DECAY OF A GIANT BE/X-RAY BINARY OUTBURST"

Our recent discovery of a radio jet produced by a highly magnetized neutron star in a Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) has opened up an unexplored parameter regime to study the launching conditions of jets, and provides a novel avenue to complement existing X-ray studies to better understand the accretion flow in BeXRBs. We propose 20 ks Swift monitoring and 9 hr VLA time to study the decay of a giant outburst of a BeXRB. Our aims are to i) determine if a sharp transition in the flux and spectral evolution is common for this class of objects, ii) gain insight into the debated origin of the X-ray emission after this transition, iii) map out the radio behavior in this regime. The proposed Swift observations will provide a rich data set that is highly valuable for the broader scientific community.

1619061 / VAN DEN EIJNDEN / UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM

"THE NATURE AND ACCRETION FLOW PROPERTIES OF SUB-LUMINOUS X-RAY BINARIES"

Very-faint X-ray transients undergo outbursts of accretion with a peak X-ray luminosity much lower than that of other black hole and neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. Studying these objects is of great interest because they trace a poorly understood accretion regime and may represent a missing population of short-period binaries or neutron stars with relatively strong magnetic fields. To study the outburst of a very-faint X-ray transient in detail, we propose 30 ks of Swift ToO monitoring observations (30 x 1 ks every other day), and 8h of deep VLA radio observations (2 x 4 hr). Complemented by guaranteed-time optical monitoring with Faulkes, these data will allow us to investigate the nature of the binary and the properties of the accretion in/out flow.

1619062 / MEHDIPOUR / SRON NETHERLANDS INSTITUTE FOR SPACE RESEARCH

"CHASING OBSCURING WINDS WITH SWIFT"

Obscuring winds are remarkably different from the commonly seen warm-absorber winds in AGN. They exhibit large columns of high-velocity gas close to the black hole. They produce broad UV absorption lines and shield much of the X-ray radiation. This has important impact on the surrounding photoionised gas and the launching mechanism of AGN outflows. These recent extraordinary findings were made possible by Swift monitoring, and subsequent joint observations with XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and HST. We propose to extend our Swift monitoring of a sample of seven suitable AGN to broaden our understanding of this phenomenon. We request weekly Swift monitoring of them in order to trigger our already-approved joint XMM-Newton/NuSTAR/HST ToO observations. In total 98 ks of Swift time is requested.

1619069 / DEGENAAR / UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM

"CONTINUING A SWIFT LEGACY: THE MONITORING CAMPAIGN OF THE GALACTIC CENTER"

The center of our Galaxy has been monitored with the Swift/XRT almost every day since 2006. The high cadence provides excellent means to capture X-ray flares from Sgr A*, and to study the accretion properties of 16 transient X-ray binaries. We propose to continue this Swift legacy program in cycles 16-17 and request daily 1-ks observations that amount to 490 ks of total exposure time. Our main objectives are to: 1) collect and study new flares from Sgr A*, 2) to test if the gaseous object G2 is disrupted and feeds matter to the supermassive black hole, and 3) to apply accretion models to very-faint X-ray binaries. This program is of high scientific value for a broad community.

1619076 / GODET / INSTITUT DE RECHERCHE EN ASTROPHYSIQUE ET PLANETOLOGIE

"VERIFYING THE RATE AT WHICH THE INTERMEDIATE MASS BLACK HOLE HLX-1 BECOMES UNBOUND FROM ITS COMPANION"

We request 30 2 ks snapshots of the intermediate mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1, to be taken every 1-2 weeks from 2020-04-01 to 2021-03-31. These data will be crucial to further understand 1) how the outburst separation time (likely tracing the aperiodic orbital period) evolves; and 2) what the ultimate fate of the system will be (e.g. donor ejection). These data will also serve, as done in the past, to trigger multi-wavelength ToOs from our group or others. Understanding how IMBHs are fed is essential to identify other good candidates for this poorly understood population, that are thought to be the building blocks of supermassive BHs.

1619083 / VESTERGAARD / UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

"MONITORING THE SLEEPING MONSTER IN AGN MRK 590 AND CLUES TO THE NATURE OF ITS RADIO EMISSION"

Our Swift monitoring shows that after a 10-year hiatus the AGN in Mrk590 is likely to turn on again in the near future. We wish to seize this rare opportunity to document, for the first time ever, the onset of AGN activity if and when it occurs since this can lead to significant insight on the long-standing issue of how AGNs are fueled. Here, we wish to continue our current monitoring of Mrk590 with Swift on a 2-week cadence and with the VLBA on a 7 week basis to determine the nature of the radio emission in Mrk590, confirm its connection to the X-ray processes, and to document the black hole state change from low/hard state to high/soft state, should it occur, since this has not been observed for massive black holes to date. Our program also serves to trigger 2 related Swift ToO programs.

1619085 / HOLWERDA / UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE

"A SWIFT DEEP/WIDE SURVEY"

Deep UV observations of LADUMA s CDFS field exists in a single field, with XMM (Antonucci et al., 2015) and SWIFT (Hagen et al., 2015). We ask for SWIFT observations of 8 fields around this central deep field in UVM2 and UVW1 to obtain rest-frame ultraviolet (GALEX NUV) at z= 0.15 and z=0.35. In combination with planned LSST u-band observations, this will make the rest-frame NUV information available from z=0 1 for the entire CDFS, key to following the evoluton of massive star formation. Deep HI observations of this field (the LADUMA project) are ongoing together with the wide SWIFT survey will reveal the relation between gas supply and massive star formation and its evolution. SWIFT is the only instrument that can deliver the filter combinations and resolution in a wide field.

1619088 / GEZARI / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK)

"SWIFT FOLLOW-UP OF INFANT TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS IN ZTF: BUILDING A LEGACY SAMPLE"

The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) is on track to transform the field of tidal disruption events (TDEs). In the first 1.5 yr of ZTF survey operations, we have demonstrated that TDEs can be efficiently and promptly discovered using a combination of optimized filtering of the ZTF transient alert stream and follow-up spectroscopy with the fully automated Spectral Energy Distribution Machine (SEDM) low-resolution spectrograph. Here we propose a Swift Cycle 16 program to capitalize on the early discovery of TDEs from ZTF and to use Swift’s unique simultaneous X-ray and UV monitoring capabilities to measure the broadband evolution of a legacy sample of 10 TDEs from their infancy.

1619091 / RICCI / GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY

"UNDERSTANDING THE ORIGIN OF THE NUCLEAR RADIO EMISSION IN RADIO-QUIET AGN"

The origin of the compact radio/mm emission observed in the vast majority of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is still largely debated. We propose here the first joint study of the mm/X-ray variability of a radio-quiet AGN using Swift and ALMA to monitor the brightest unobscured AGN in the southern sky, IC 4329A, observing it once per day over ten consecutive days. The ALMA monitoring has already been approved (priority A). This would be the first time such monitoring is carried out, and the detection of correlated mm/X-ray variability would be crucial proof of the coronal origin of the nuclear radio emission in radio-quiet AGN. Besides, this would also be fundamental to understand the origin of the X-ray emission, proving, for the first time, that the X-ray corona is magnetically-heated.

1619095 / WALTON / UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

"THE HUNT FOR NEW PULSAR ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES"

Following a series of remarkable recent discoveries, we now know that some of the most luminous members of the ULX population are actually powered by highly super-Eddington neutron star accretors. Six such systems are now known, but based on the long-term variability characteristics exhibited by these sources, we have compiled a sample of 19 additional potential ULX pulsar candidates from the broader ULX population. Here we propose a pilot program to monitor 2 of the most promising of these: NGC891 ULX and NGC2403 ULX2. Our primary goals are to better determine their long-term variability characteristics and in turn undertake a more robust comparison with the known ULX pulsars, and to trigger deep follow-up when the sources are at high luminosity to search for pulsations directly.

1619102 / FOLEY / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (SANTA CRUZ)

"PROBING THE PROGENITOR METALLICITY OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE WITH EARLY-TIME UV SPECTROSCOPY"

Ultraviolet (UV) observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are useful for understanding progenitor systems and explosion physics. Theory suggests that progenitor metallicy differences have little effect on optical SN data, but significantly change UV spectra. To address this problem, we reduced (with our new pipeline) and published all Swift SN Ia UV spectra, the largest such sample to date. With this sample, we confirm theoretical predictions and also find that SN Ia UV spectra before peak appear to be much stronger metallicity indicators. However, the current early-time sample is too small for statistical analyses. We propose to obtain UV spectra of 6 SN Ia >1 week before peak to better investigate the metallicity effect and improve the cosmological precision of SNe Ia.

1619105 / KENNEA / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"KEY PROJECT: THE DETECTION AND MONITORING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC COUNTERPARTS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SOURCES WITH SWIFT"

We seek to support the Swift program to identify EM counterparts of GW events in the final part of O3 and the start of O4. Based on lessons learned during O2 and the in-progress O3, including the detection of the first NS-NS merger event with an EM counterpart, GW 170817, we propose to greatly enhance the Swift GW follow-up program with 4 new initiatives. These include optimizing our follow-up strategy and trigger criteria, increasing sensitivity utilizing pre-imaging surveys, searching for prompt emission in BAT data ,and refactoring our response for the expected higher rates and smaller localizations in O4. In addition, we request deep follow-up observations at high priority in order to monitor and characterize any EM candidate detected by Swift or other observatories.

1619106 / MCHARDY / UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON

"THE X-RAY/RADIO LINK IN RADIO-QUIET AGN"

The origin of radio emission in ’radio quiet’ (RQ), ie non-blazar, AGN, is almost completely unknown. The key to unravelling the physical mechanism is, as in the better understood X-ray binary systems, to determine the link between the X-ray and radio variations. E.g, for radio emission from a jet we expect a positive correlation but for radio from a corona, an anti-correlation. Although there is great, rapidly growing, interest in this field, there are few useful observations. Our own preliminary observations show a possible change from correlated variability at low accretion rates to anti-correlated at high rates. Here we propose an ambitious study of 4 RQ AGN, across a range of accretion rates, to clearly determine the X-ray/radio links and put this field on a much firmer footing.

1619108 / VASILOPOULOS / YALE UNIVERSITY

"EXPLORING THE PROLONGED LOW FLUX STATE OF NGC 300 ULX1"

It is now clear than many ultra-luminous X-ray sources are hosting rotating Neutron Star. But some of their fundamental properties still remains elusive. Among others, we do not know if mass transfer is stable, and we do not fully understand the formation and evolution of outflows. NGC300 ULX-1 is an ideal system for shedding light into these open questions.Its mass accretion rate remained almost constant for a period of at least 4 years, and its magnetic field is fairly well constrained. On September 2018 the system entered a low-flux state, and has remained in that state till today. A continuous monitoring of the system is crucial for identifying patterns of long-term X-ray variability, monitoring this prolonged and unusual off state, and providing trigger alerts for a re-brightening.

1619109 / VALENTI / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (DAVIS)

"HIGH CADENCE UV LIGHT CURVES OF EXTREMELY YOUNG SUPERNOVAE"

We are conducting a 12-hour cadence SN search of nearby galaxies (D<40 Mpc), directly tied to ground-based imaging/spectroscopy for immediate followup. In several instances, DLT40 and its ground-based follow-up have revealed early light curve features (which vary on hour time scales) that point to shock breakout, CSM or companion star interactions. One of the main limitations is the cadence of the accompanying Swift UV observations, which start 1-2-days after the request, and have typical cadences of 1 day. Here we request early, high cadence (6 hours) UV light curves of all young DLT40 SNe which have nondetections within 24 hours of discovery. This legacy dataset of 5 SNe, when combined with our ground-based campaigns, will point to the progenitor system and its environment.

1619110 / AYDI / MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

"IN SEARCH OF SHOCKS: MONITORING NOVAE WITH SWIFT"

The lack of X-ray detections from shocks that power gamma-ray emission in novae challenges our understanding of these shocks. Whether this lack points to something fundamental about the shock physics, or is simply an issue of small-number statistics, is unclear. We request monitoring of up to two bright novae with Swift (160 ks total request), for one year after discovery, to expand the sample of gamma-ray novae with exquisite X-ray light curves. The resulting data will be interpreted alongside multi-wavelength observations to better understand shocks in novae, particularly characterize the luminosity, duration, temperature, location, and absorbing column of these shocks.

1619117 / CORSI / TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

"A SEARCH FOR BL-IC SNE WITH X-RAY AFTERGLOWS USING ZTF+SWIFT"

The rare class of massive-star explosions dubbed broad-lined (BL) Type Ic supernovae (SNe), estimated to constitute only ~5% of the Ib/c (stripped-envelope core-collapse) SN population, is of special interest due to its relation to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRBs are the most relativistic explosions arising from a collapsing compact object. What makes some BL-Ic SNe produce a GRB remains a mystery. Two key questions are yet to be answered: (i) What fraction of BL-Ic SNe have radio/X-ray afterglows powered by relativistic ejecta? (ii) Are low-luminosity GRBs beamed? Our proposal aims at answering both of these questions via follow-up observations of SNe discovered by the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), using the Neil Gehrels Swift observatory and the Karl G. Jansky VLA.

1619120 / AYALA SOLARES / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT FOLLOW-UP SEARCHES OF COINCIDENCES FROM THE AMON NEUTRINO + GAMMA-RAY PROGRAM"

The Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON) has established a neutrino + gamma-ray program, where distinct channels monitor for coincidences between high-energy gamma-ray and neutrino events from different observatories. We request a set of four Swift ToO campaigns to search for X-ray and/or UV/optical counterparts to multimessenger neutrino + gamma-ray coincidences during Cycle~16. Our program will flag a priori rare coincidences between high-energy neutrino data from the ANTARES and IceCube neutrino observatories and gamma-ray data from the Swift-BAT, Fermi-LAT, and High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-ray observatories.

1619121 / BODEWITS / AUBURN UNIVERSITY

"RAPID FOLLOW UP CHARACTERIZATION OF COMETARY OUTBURST EJECTA"

We request 36 orbits of observing time to rapidly follow-up on three comet outburst, fragmentation, or disintegration events. We will use Swift to measure the mass and chemical composition of the ejecta. By monitoring the comets activity in a period of two weeks afterwards we will determine whether the outburst triggered permanent activity, and if the chemical composition of the ejecta differs from material released by quiescent activity. This allows us to study the cause of cometary outbursts and to investigate how materials on the comets surfaces are altered with respect to more primitive sub-surface volatiles. Swift provides a unique combination of wide-field imaging and spectroscopy in the UV with rapid follow-up capabilities that is critical to meet our objectives.

1619122 / HOLOIEN / CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON

"EARLY-TIME UVOT AND XRT FOLLOW-UP OF BRIGHT TDES DETECTED BY ASAS-SN"

We propose to use Swift to obtain TOO observations of 2 nearby tidal disruption events (TDEs) detected by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) in 2020-2021. We request 30-60 epochs of observation with 1.5-3ks per epoch, for a total of 90ks. ASAS-SN covers the entire visible sky to g~18.5 mag every 20 hours, and we have discovered six bright, nearby TDEs in 2018 and 2019. Most TDEs detected by ASAS-SN are being discovered well before peak light, allowing for early-time observations that have not been previously possible. Swift observations have provided critical early-time data about the X-ray and UV emission of these recent TDEs, driving new theoretical models of TDE physics. The proposed observations will allow us to obtain similar early-time data for future bright TDEs.

1619126 / KAUR / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"CLASSIFICATION OF NEW X-RAY COUNTERPARTS FOR FERMI UNASSOCIATED GAMMA RAY SOURCES USING SWIFT ARCHIVAL DATA"

Out of 5098 sources in the 4th Fermi catalog, 1/3rd are unassociated. Nonetheless, the two most dominant extragalactic and galactic populations in the gamma-ray sky are blazars and pulsars, respectively. We have recently developed a machine learning algorithm to identify blazars and pulsars among the Fermi unassociated sources utilizing Swift-XRT data with Fermi. We have successfully utilized this method to find (and confirm independently in some cases) blazars and pulsars in the previous Fermi catalogs. Swift-XRT has already observed ~150 of the 4FGL unassociated sources. Our proposed work would utilize these existing Swift-XRT data, along with Fermi source parameters, to characterize the discovered X-ray counterparts as new likely blazars, pulsars, or ambiguous sources.

1619130 / TERRERAN / NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

"EXPLOSION MECHANISMS AND ENERGY SOURCES POWERING SUPER-LUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE"

With peak luminosities L peak~10^45 erg/s, the new class of Super-Luminous supernovae (SLSNe) outshine standard SN explosions of a factor ~10-100 and represent the death of the most massive stars in our Universe. The nature of their exceptional luminosity is still unclear and requires exotic explosion mechanisms and/or peculiar sources of energy. Here we propose rapid Swift follow up of 2 newly-discovered SLSNe to map their UV and X-ray emission during the early stages of their evolution as part of our multi-wavelength effort through programs on the VLA, Chandra and optical/NIR facilities. The final aim is to: (i) Pin down the energy source of SLSNe; (ii) Map the diversity of their progenitor stars and pre-explosion evolution.

1619132 / WARGELIN / SMITHSONIAN ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY

"PROXIMA CENTAURI’S STELLAR CYCLE"

Over a decade of optical monitoring has established the existence of a solar-like 7-year stellar cycle in Proxima Cen, a fully convective dM5.5e star, with further support from Swift X-ray and UV observations that now span more than one full cycle. This important discovery, along with recent theoretical and observational work on fully convective stars, is leading to major advances in our understanding of the structure and evolution of late M stars, and of cool-star magnetic fields in general. We request twelve 3.5-ks observations with 16-day spacing to continue our long term X-ray/UV study of the cycle. Proxima is the only late-type M star practical for such work, and Swift is uniquely well suited for the challenges of monitoring high-energy emission from this flare star.

1619136 / MOLINA / MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY

"A STATISTICAL APPROACH TO STAR FORMATION AND QUENCHING IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE"

The combination of Swift/UVOT NUV imaging and MaNGA integral-field spectroscopy is uniquely suited for investigating some of the most important questions of galaxy evolution, including the processes that regulate star formation and its quenching, and the relationship between stellar and nebular attenuation on the kpc-scales relevant to high-z surveys. We have been using archival UVOT images of 150 MaNGA galaxies to investigate these topics. However our sample is deficient in red, high-mass galaxies and small, blue objects. We propose to correct this by using UVOT to observe 14 of these extreme systems. These data will create a statistically complete sample, and allow us to explore quenching and attenuation in nearby galaxies without the biases associated with galaxy selection.

1619139 / RIVERA SANDOVAL / TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

"UNDERSTANDING THE ORIGIN OF FAST-EVOLVING LUMINOUS TRANSIENTS"

In 2018 the discovery of the transient AT2018cow was a big breakthrough in the astronomical community given its unprecedented characteristics. It was the first Fast-Evolving Luminous Transient (FELT) to be discovered in real time and extensively studied in all bands, which has led to several interpretations about its origin. Using Swift XRT and UVOT data, our team discovered the X-ray and UV emission of AT2018cow, showing it was a bright X-ray and UV transient with very rapid X-ray variability (of even hrs) and a peculiar X-ray spectrum. These characteristics were observed for the first time on a FELT. We propose to investigate the origin of FELTs by exploiting the rapid response and multi band coverage of Swift, the higher X-ray energy coverage of NuSTAR and the large sensitivity of VLA.

1619141 / EARNSHAW / CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

"UNDERSTANDING EXTREME ULX VARIABILITY: NGC 925 ULX-3"

NGC 925 ULX-3 is a transient ULX, having been detected at luminosities up to 10^40 erg/s, but only observed to be bright on three previous occasions, being undetected or detected at far lower, sub-ULX luminosities at other times. Therefore this source is an excellent target for the study of extreme variability in ULXs, but its sparse coverage to date means that it is as yet unknown whether this source is undergoing the propeller effect or if it exhibits a super-orbital period, both of which are variability mechanisms seen other ULXs, in particular those with neutron star accretors. We propose a Swift-XRT monitoring campaign of NGC 925 for 27 x 3ks visits in order to track the change in NGC 925 ULX-3 s flux and establish the physical mechanism behind its high-amplitude variability.

1619144 / TOMSICK / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"TOO OBSERVATION OF GRBS DETECTED WITH THE COSI BALLOON PAYLOAD"

The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI) is a wide-field (25% sky), balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope (0.1-5 MeV) that will launch from New Zealand around April 1, 2020. COSI goals include localizing GRBs and performing measurements of their gamma-ray polarization to probe the prompt emission mechanism. If the 2020 flight lasts as long as the 2016 flight did (46 days), we anticipate detecting ~3-4 GRBs and definitively measuring the polarization of ~2 GRBs. We are requesting Swift TOO observations of GRBs detected by COSI if the fluence level is high enough to permit a polarization measurement or if there is a plausibly associated gravitational wave detection. Swift/XRT observations will refine the position to identify the host galaxy and determine the redshift.

1619146 / CHARLTON / MCGILL UNIVERSITY

"UV/X-RAY MONITORING OF ACCRETION STATE TRANSITIONS IN A FADING QUASAR"

We propose to continue Swift monitoring of the changing-look active galactic nucleus (AGN) ZTF18aajupnt as it fades from the outburst observed in 2017 (Frederick et al. 2019). Analysis of archival Swift data by Ruan et al. (2019b) shows that ZTF18aajupnt is approaching a critical Eddington ratio at which the evolution of alpha OX with accretion rate is observed to invert in X-ray binaries. Observing this inversion in a single object would test models of this spectral softening in AGN, strengthening the AGN-X-ray binary analogy. We will accomplish this with simultaneous Swift UVOT/XRT monitoring of ZTF18aajupnt as it continues to fade.

1619148 / RAJAGOPAL / CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

"HUNTING HIGH REDSHIFT BLAZARS WITH SWIFT AND SARA-CT/ORM"

The class of AGNs called blazars, are prominent members of Fermi detected sources. The study of blazar evolution with redshift is important as they also provide a powerful diagnostic tool to study the evolution of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL). Using blazars as cosmological probes requires knowledge of their redshift. We propose to jointly use Swift-UVOT and SARA-CT/ORM, a 0.65m and 1m telescope in Chile and Spain respectively, to derive photometric redshifts for sources above z~1.3. This method makes use of 10 UV-optical filters, which allows for reliable redshift measurements. This project will deliver measurements of the Spectral Energy Distributions for 20 3FGL blazars and establish photometric redshifts for those with z > 1.3.

1619152 / PRITCHARD / NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

"MULTI-WAVELENGTHCHARACTERIZATION OF YOUNG FAST EVOLVING TRANSIENTS FOR LSST AND BEYOND"

We propose to use Swift to study the UV&X-ray flux of young, rare, interesting, blue transients which we will efficiently identify using a combination of overlapping ZTF/ASAS-SN daily cadence survey data as part of their committed TESS followup and an efficient classification method originally developed for LSST. This strategy will enable us to obtain early UV observations of rare, difficult to detect objects such as Fast Blue Optical Transients (FBOTs) and Infant Supernovae in order to constrain their progenitors and explosion mechanisms. Furthermore, following such transients with Swift will allow us to improve the detection and follow-up strategy for future surveys, such as LSST, by allowing us to accurately characterize UV emission from nearby objects and extrapolate them to high z.

1619170 / SANTANDER / UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

"THE NEUTRINO/BLAZAR COSMIC GAMES: IC170922A AND TXS 0506+056, WHAT NEXT?"

Despite having been for long time merely a prediction by some cosmic-ray theorists, nowadays multi-messenger astrophysics reveals to be a blooming field and promising ground for discoveries. The coincidence of an IceCube high-energy neutrino with a g-ray blazar has directed the attention to this class of objects, as the most promising one to make a first step forward into the open question of the high-energy cosmic-ray origin. Building on this successful detection, we propose Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory follow-up observations of promising neutrino source candidates. The Swift data will be a crucial complement to our ancillary multi-wavelength observations to provide further proof of the AGN-neutrino link.