The Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory

Swift Cycle 20 Results

The lists below contain the proposals recommended by the Cycle 20 Peer Review panel. Note that in addition to the accepted programs below, ToO requests for exceptional transients will continue to be possible through the Swift ToO web site, even for ToOs not accepted into the GI Program. The decision on whether or not to observe a ToO of either category will be made by the Swift Principal Investigator.

PIs of Cycle 20 proposals for observation: Please note that the ROSES 2023 Appendix D.5 "Swift Guest Investigator Cycle 20" states:

"It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator (PI) of an accepted ToO to alert the Swift Observatory Duty Scientist when trigger conditions for their accepted ToO have been met. This is done through the Swift ToO Request Form at https://www.swift.psu.edu/. It is highly recommended that ToO proposers register as Swift ToO users in advance at https://www.swift.psu.edu/. Registration is required in order to submit a ToO Request.

ToO proposals must have an astrophysical trigger. Once the trigger criteria have been met for an approved target, the PI should check if the target location is more than 47 degrees from the Sun and more than 23 degrees from the Moon before requesting Swift observations (http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Tools/Viewing.html).

Accepted Cycle 20 ToO proposals may be triggered until March 31, 2025."

Jump to:

Recommended Proposals

Prop        PI                   Title
2023010     MARGUTTI             A STUDY OF SUPER-LUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE ACROSS THE SPECTRUM
2023011     MARGUTTI             TESTING THE LIMIT: SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE FASTEST EXPLOSIONS
2023019     HOMAN                OBSERVING THE EARLY RISE OF X-RAY TRANSIENTS WITH SWIFT
2023027     PARSOTAN             INCREASING THE RATE OF WELL-LOCALIZED TRANSIENTS WITH BAT-GUANO
2023033     LAHA                 SWIFT MONITORING OF A CHANGING-LOOK AGN WITH A NEWLY-LAUNCHED RADIO JET
2023036     LAHA                 SWIFT+FAST SIMULTANEOUS TOO OBSERVATIONS OF REPEATING FAST RADIO BURSTS.
2023037     CHERNYAKOVA          SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF PSR B1259-63 DURING ITS 2024 PERIASTRON PASSAGE.
2023048     JONKER               AUTOMATED SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF EINSTEIN PROBE-DISCOVERED EXTRA-GALACTIC FAST X-RAY TRANSIENTS
2023050     EVANS                FOLLOW UP OF NEW X-RAY TRANSIENTS DETECTED BY SWIFT
2023066     CORSI                A SEARCH FOR NEARBY SNE IC-BL WITH X-RAY AFTERGLOWS
2023080     DEGENAAR             COMPLETING 20 YEARS OF SWIFT MONITORING OF THE GALACTIC CENTER
2023081     NUNEZ                GROUP-X, A NEW LABORATORY FOR INVESTIGATING THE ACTIVITY-ROTATION RELATION
2023083     DEGENAAR             THE NATURE AND ACCRETION FLOW PROPERTIES OF SUB-LUMINOUS X-RAY BINARIES
2023085     ARCODIA              SWIFT-XRT FOLLOW-UP OF EROSITA QPE CANDIDATES SELECTED THROUGH X-RAY VARIABILITY
2023095     NOTSU                SIMULTANEOUS SWIFT/UVOT NUV PHOTOMETRY WITH THE HST TREASURY PROGRAM NUV SPECTROSCOPY AND
                                 TESS PHOTOMETRY
2023100     JACOBSON-GALAN       SYNTHESIZING SWIFT AND FLASH SPECTROSCOPY AS A NOVEL PROBE OF MASS-LOSS
2023102     JOFFRE               UNCOVERING THE MOST POWERFUL JETS THROUGH COSMIC TIME
2023104     MEHDIPOUR            CATCHING TRANSIENT OBSCURING OUTFLOWS IN AGN WITH SWIFT
2023113     VAN DEN EIJNDEN      SWIFT/VLA MONITORING OF THE DECAY OF A GIANT BE/X-RAY BINARY OUTBURST
2023120     WALTON               TESTING THE LENSE-THIRRING MODEL FOR ULX VARIABILITY WITH NGC5907 ULX1
2023124     AUCHETTL             SWIFT'S MULTI-WAVELENGTH VIEW OF THE NEXT NEARBY TDE
2023131     GEZARI               VENTURING INTO THE IMBH FRONTIER WITH TDES
2023142     GUEVEL               DIAGNOSE THE NATURE OF THE TEV HALO HESS J1813-126 WITH SWIFT-XRT
2023143     SHENG                DISCOVERING HIGH-Z BL LACS WITH SWIFT/UVOT
2023146     FUERST               SWIFT MONITORING OF THE ULTRA-LUMINOUS X-RAY PULSAR NGC 7793 P13
2023148     KENNEA               SWIFT LOCALIZATION OF MAXI DISCOVERED GALACTIC X-RAY TRANSIENTS IN CYCLE 20
2023153     GOKUS                GAMMA-RAY FLARES OF HIGH-REDSHIFT BLAZARS
2023156     GUOLO                MONITORING OF THE SUPER-LONG QUASI-PERIODIC X-RAY ERUPTER SWIFT J0230+28
2023162     DHUGA                X-RAY/UV MONITORING OF 2 LOW LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI
2023163     KENNEA               KEY PROJECT: THE DETECTION AND MONITORING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC COUNTERPARTS OF GRAVITATIONAL
                                 WAVE SOURCES WITH SWIFT IN O4
2023165     TUBIN                PROVING THE X-RAY PERIODICITY OF AN EROSITA-SELECTED SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARY CANDIDATE
                                 WITH SWIFT
2023166     BROWN                NOT DONE YET: TEMPLATE OBSERVATIONS OF SWIFT SUPERNOVAE
2023170     TORRES-ALBA          SWIFT TOOS FOR FERMI GALACTIC PLANE TRANSIENTS
2023173     DICHIARA             SEARCHING HIGH AND LOW FOR ELUSIVE SHORT GRBS
2023176     BORGHESE             SWIFT MONITORING OF MAGNETAR OUTBURSTS
2023180     KENNEA               IDENTIFYING THE ELECTROMAGNETIC COUNTERPARTS TO COSMIC NEUTRINO SOURCES
2023182     BUSON                THE X-RAY HADRONIC IMPRINT IN NEUTRINO-EMITTER BLAZARS
2023192     LUNA                 THE BRIGHTEST NOVA IN THE LAST 80 YEARS.
2023196     RAVI                 HIGH-CADENCE UV LIGHT CURVES OF EXTREMELY YOUNG SUPERNOVAE
2023206     PRINCE               INVESTIGATING THE X-RAY/UV CORRELATIONS WITH INTENSIVE SWIFT MONITORING IN A NEWLY DISCOVERED
                                 BRIGHT AND MASSIVE AGN
2023217     KRUMPE               CONSTRAINING THE TIMESCALES OF MAJOR ACCRETION TRANSITION IN AGN
2023221     HERNANDEZ-GARCIA     CHARACTERIZING THE EXOTIC NUCLEAR TRANSIENT AT2021HDR
2023227     SANTANDER            BLAZARS AS NEUTRINO SOURCES: IDENTIFYING HADRONIC EMISSION WITH SWIFT
2023233     MARCOTULLI           DOUBLING THE SAMPLE OF YOUNG LOW-POWER GAMMA-RAY JETS
2023236     KYNOCH               THE DRIVING CONTINUUM OF THE SUPER-EDDINGTON QUASAR PDS 456
2023238     LEVINE               OBSERVING HIGH-ENERGY RADIATION EVAPORATE AN EXOPLANET
2023240     YOUNG                EXPLORING THE EVOLUTION OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS SPIRALS
2023243     BODEWITS             THE ACTIVITY AND EVOLUTION OF OORT CLOUD COMETS
2023261     SOKOLOSKI            DRIVING NOVA THEORY WITH PRE-ERUPTION MONITORING OF T CRB
2023264     DURBAK               RIMAS: THE RAPID IMAGER AND SPECTROGRAPH; A NEW TOOL FOR HIGH-REDSHIFT GRBS
2023265     CHAKRABORTY          UNDERSTANDING THE DIVERSITY OF UNEXPECTED LATE-TIME BEHAVIOR IN TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS
2023269     FOLEY                A NEW WINDOW INTO COMPACT OBJECT PHYSICS: THE WIDEST BINARIES
2023278     CHORNOCK             SEEING THE DISK: LATE-TIME SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF TDES
2023281     EYLES-FERRIS         FOLLOW-UP OF TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS DETECTED BY EINSTEIN PROBE AND SVOM
2023284     ISLAM                UNRAVELLING THE PHYSICS OF SUPERORBITAL MODULATIONS IN SUPERGIANT HIGH MASS X-RAY BINARIES
                                 WITH SWIFT
2023287     PELLEGRINO           SWIFT TEMPLATE OBSERVATIONS FOR LEGACY TRANSIENT ARCHIVES
2023288     LIN                  TWO UNIQUE SOURCES IN A ROW: ESO 243-49 HLX-1 AND A NEWBORN HARD TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT
2023290     WANG                 TRACING THE EVOLUTION OF SNE IBN/ICN WITH SWIFT

Recommended Targets

Definition of Columns

  1. Proposal: Proposal number assigned by Swift mission
  2. PI: Principal Investigator's last name
  3. Target_Num: Target number as listed on the proposal form
  4. Target_Name: Target name as listed on proposal forms
  5. Time: Total observing time approved, in ksec
  6. ToO: "Y" if Target of Opportunity proposal, otherwise "N"
  7. RA: Right Ascension (equinox J2000) in degrees
  8. Dec: Declination (equinox J2000) in degrees

Prop    | PI               | Target_Num | Target_Name          | Time [ ks ] | TOO | RA [deg]  | Dec [deg] |
2023010 | MARGUTTI         | 1          | SLSN1                | 110         | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023010 | MARGUTTI         | 2          | SLSN2                | 110         | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023011 | MARGUTTI         | 1          | FBOT                 | 90          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023019 | HOMAN            | 1          | TRANSIENT 1          | 20          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023019 | HOMAN            | 2          | TRANSIENT 2          | 20          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023033 | LAHA             | 1          | 1ES 1927+654         | 52          | N   | 291.83142 | 65.56508  |
2023036 | LAHA             | 1          | FRB_TOO              | 50          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023036 | LAHA             | 2          | FRB_TOO              | 50          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023037 | CHERNYAKOVA      | 1          | PSR B1259-63         | 97.5        | N   | 195.699   | -63.836   |
2023048 | JONKER           | 1          | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 2          | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 3          | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 4          | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 5          | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 6          | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 7          | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 8          | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 9          | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 10         | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 11         | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023048 | JONKER           | 12         | EP-FXT1              | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 1          | CONF TRANS 1         | 7           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 2          | CONF TRANS 2         | 7           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 3          | CONF TRANS 3         | 7           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 4          | CONF TRANS 4         | 7           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 5          | CONF TRANS 5         | 28          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 6          | CONF TRANS 6         | 28          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 7          | CONF TRANS 7         | 29          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 8          | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 1     | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 9          | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 2     | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 10         | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 3     | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 11         | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 4     | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 12         | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 5     | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 13         | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 6     | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 14         | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 7     | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 15         | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 8     | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 16         | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 9     | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023050 | EVANS            | 17         | NEEDS FOLLOWUP 10    | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023066 | CORSI            | 1          | SN1                  | 15          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023066 | CORSI            | 2          | SN2                  | 15          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023066 | CORSI            | 3          | SN3                  | 15          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023080 | DEGENAAR         | 1          | GALACTIC CENTER      | 490         | N   | 266.4     | -28.98333 |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 1          | URAT1-757218330      | 16          | N   | 218.93883 | 61.2755   |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 2          | HD 238423            | 2           | N   | 225.82025 | 59.01153  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 3          | URAT1-750238750      | 17          | N   | 230.09079 | 59.97242  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 4          | BD+49 2434           | 2           | N   | 238.64988 | 49.39544  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 5          | HD 238351            | 2           | N   | 216.29642 | 57.63322  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 6          | URAT1-705230103      | 19          | N   | 209.30888 | 50.94919  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 7          | HD 234065            | 3           | N   | 205.7825  | 54.02592  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 8          | HD 234061            | 2           | N   | 205.40225 | 53.33753  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 9          | URAT1-752231101      | 14          | N   | 197.86138 | 60.20553  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 10         | TYC 3877-725-1       | 3           | N   | 240.27854 | 53.41639  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 11         | URAT1-753231272      | 19          | N   | 213.47104 | 60.57864  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 12         | TYC 3861-1374-1      | 3           | N   | 222.52367 | 53.63483  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 13         | TYC 4173-609-1       | 3           | N   | 219.82017 | 61.93128  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 14         | TYC 4183-927-1       | 4           | N   | 226.22817 | 63.74164  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 15         | URAT1-687234652      | 17          | N   | 213.12117 | 47.37925  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 16         | TYC 3875-762-1       | 5           | N   | 231.92354 | 59.98703  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 17         | TYC 3868-177-1       | 5           | N   | 230.81629 | 54.84822  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 18         | TYC 3497-1053-1      | 6           | N   | 240.51017 | 51.33533  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 19         | TYC 3489-1148-1      | 5           | N   | 234.46004 | 51.53769  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 20         | TYC 3496-1082-1      | 7           | N   | 237.92417 | 52.30631  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 21         | TYC 3851-600-1       | 5           | N   | 207.11433 | 54.04272  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 22         | TYC 3486-1405-1      | 8           | N   | 234.13475 | 48.27972  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 23         | TYC 3869-656-1       | 7           | N   | 232.80925 | 53.46014  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 24         | TYC 4174-1117-1      | 9           | N   | 209.67142 | 63.68878  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 25         | TYC 3040-883-1       | 5           | N   | 211.22808 | 42.92378  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 26         | TYC 3867-1373-1      | 7           | N   | 222.87608 | 59.53208  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 27         | URAT1-715249269      | 14          | N   | 253.89125 | 52.87233  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 28         | URAT1-722250044      | 16          | N   | 255.73025 | 54.34072  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 29         | TYC 4164-274-1       | 9           | N   | 204.86362 | 61.06175  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 30         | UCAC4 735-053957     | 12          | N   | 218.89658 | 56.93225  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 31         | URAT1-674239311      | 16          | N   | 244.46375 | 44.78003  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 32         | TIC 198204954        | 14          | N   | 246.80504 | 62.96806  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 33         | UCAC4 715-052363     | 11          | N   | 211.62192 | 52.98533  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 34         | UCAC4 705-053976     | 18          | N   | 237.38162 | 50.87061  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 35         | URAT1-739244050      | 9           | N   | 234.45646 | 57.68433  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 36         | UCAC4 714-052491     | 14          | N   | 220.73492 | 52.68367  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 37         | URAT1-707244162      | 20          | N   | 251.45258 | 51.21631  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 38         | UCAC4 744-049386     | 7           | N   | 222.57475 | 58.68911  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 39         | URAT1-659242246      | 4           | N   | 244.02321 | 41.73656  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 40         | URAT1-698246568      | 5           | N   | 242.14471 | 49.5255   |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 41         | UCAC4 730-051913     | 5           | N   | 212.164   | 55.92603  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 42         | UCAC4 707-051910     | 17          | N   | 209.59942 | 51.37844  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 43         | URAT1-717239197      | 5           | N   | 207.49296 | 53.24642  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 44         | URAT1-711236225      | 6           | N   | 208.65225 | 52.01122  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 45         | URAT1-721250635      | 17          | N   | 252.48817 | 54.03517  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 46         | URAT1-743240106      | 8           | N   | 228.99508 | 58.58511  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 47         | URAT1-718236953      | 6           | N   | 205.39717 | 53.56217  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 48         | URAT1-746236218      | 7           | N   | 214.74871 | 59.15297  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 49         | URAT1-724241028      | 8           | N   | 229.15271 | 54.66822  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 50         | URAT1-751232663      | 8           | N   | 217.69417 | 60.19039  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 51         | TIC 159871552        | 10          | N   | 237.62408 | 53.46406  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 52         | URAT1-718246366      | 13          | N   | 242.3105  | 53.44553  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 53         | URAT1-724242943      | 11          | N   | 236.47679 | 54.69214  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 54         | URAT1-729242829      | 12          | N   | 235.06221 | 55.70308  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 55         | URAT1-713234608      | 9           | N   | 201.34025 | 52.42244  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 56         | URAT1-741240363      | 13          | N   | 228.89671 | 58.12036  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 57         | URAT1-705230414      | 8           | N   | 210.76621 | 50.98447  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 58         | UCAC4 681-054159     | 8           | N   | 195.25367 | 46.07236  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 59         | URAT1-733240725      | 17          | N   | 205.85775 | 56.48047  |
2023081 | NUNEZ            | 60         | URAT1-709239412      | 18          | N   | 221.90537 | 51.62794  |
2023083 | DEGENAAR         | 1          | VFXT-1               | 25          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023083 | DEGENAAR         | 2          | VFXT-2               | 25          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023085 | ARCODIA          | 1          | ERASST J235400-53070 | 24          | N   | 358.49879 | -53.11708 |
2023085 | ARCODIA          | 2          | ERASST J032543-45124 | 22.4        | N   | 51.43029  | -45.21242 |
2023085 | ARCODIA          | 3          | ERASST J012026-29272 | 24          | N   | 20.111    | -29.45836 |
2023095 | NOTSU            | 1          | GJ 1243              | 144         | N   | 297.78883 | 46.48339  |
2023100 | JACOBSON-GALAN   | 1          | NEW SN II            | 10.5        | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023100 | JACOBSON-GALAN   | 2          | NEW SN II            | 10.5        | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023100 | JACOBSON-GALAN   | 3          | NEW SN II            | 10.5        | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023100 | JACOBSON-GALAN   | 4          | NEW SN II            | 10.5        | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023100 | JACOBSON-GALAN   | 5          | NEW SN II            | 10.5        | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023100 | JACOBSON-GALAN   | 6          | NEW SN II            | 10.5        | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023100 | JACOBSON-GALAN   | 7          | NEW SN II            | 10.5        | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023102 | JOFFRE           | 1          | BZQ J1114-0816       | 15          | N   | 168.35967 | -8.51872  |
2023102 | JOFFRE           | 2          | BZQ J0610-6058       | 9           | N   | 92.65342  | -60.73019 |
2023102 | JOFFRE           | 3          | BZQ J2153-1136       | 13          | N   | 329.00779 | -11.74558 |
2023102 | JOFFRE           | 4          | BZQ J0051-4226       | 8           | N   | 12.67958  | -42.62958 |
2023104 | MEHDIPOUR        | 1          | MRK 509              | 11          | N   | 311.04063 | -10.72353 |
2023104 | MEHDIPOUR        | 2          | NGC 985              | 14          | N   | 38.65783  | -8.78806  |
2023104 | MEHDIPOUR        | 3          | NGC 3783             | 15          | N   | 174.75713 | -37.73861 |
2023104 | MEHDIPOUR        | 4          | NGC 4593             | 13          | N   | 189.91433 | -5.34417  |
2023104 | MEHDIPOUR        | 5          | NGC 5548             | 15          | N   | 214.49808 | 25.13683  |
2023104 | MEHDIPOUR        | 6          | NGC 7469             | 14          | N   | 345.81529 | 8.87369   |
2023113 | VAN DEN EIJNDEN  | 1          | TRANSIENT BEXRB      | 20          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023120 | WALTON           | 1          | NGC5907 ULX1         | 104         | N   | 228.99571 | 56.30303  |
2023124 | AUCHETTL         | 1          | BH-TDE               | 62          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 1          | TDE1                 | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 2          | TDE2                 | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 3          | TDE3                 | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 4          | TDE4                 | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 5          | TDE5                 | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 6          | TDE6                 | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 7          | TDE7                 | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 8          | TDE8                 | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 9          | TDE9                 | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023131 | GEZARI           | 10         | TDE10                | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023142 | GUEVEL           | 1          | HESS J1813-126       | 40          | N   | 273.19854 | -12.67878 |
2023142 | GUEVEL           | 2          | HESS J1813-126       | 40          | N   | 272.97358 | -12.55917 |
2023142 | GUEVEL           | 3          | HESS J1813-126       | 10          | N   | 272.52429 | -12.31933 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 1          | 4FGL J0836.2+2141    | 2           | N   | 129.06758 | 21.651    |
2023143 | SHENG            | 2          | 4FGL J0009.8-6358    | 2           | N   | 2.40629   | -63.95939 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 3          | 4FGL J0024.4+4647    | 2           | N   | 6.08975   | 46.73506  |
2023143 | SHENG            | 4          | 4FGL J0437.2-5846    | 2           | N   | 69.18012  | -58.66953 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 5          | 4FGL J0125.4+3200    | 2           | N   | 21.42929  | 31.88733  |
2023143 | SHENG            | 6          | 4FGL J0125.8+2605    | 2           | N   | 21.47021  | 26.11022  |
2023143 | SHENG            | 7          | 4FGL J0159.3-4523    | 2           | N   | 29.77804  | -45.26056 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 8          | 4FGL J0221.2-1312    | 2           | N   | 35.30117  | -13.0465  |
2023143 | SHENG            | 9          | 4FGL J0239.5-1353    | 2           | N   | 39.91304  | -13.90264 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 10         | 4FGL J0250.3-3422    | 2           | N   | 42.57579  | -34.31328 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 11         | 4FGL J0303.4-5232    | 2           | N   | 45.86746  | -52.57592 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 12         | 4FGL J0327.5-1805    | 2           | N   | 51.93058  | -18.06167 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 13         | 4FGL J0328.9+3514    | 2           | N   | 52.314    | 35.16833  |
2023143 | SHENG            | 14         | 4FGL J0640.7-1924    | 2           | N   | 100.24517 | -19.52169 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 15         | 4FGL J0429.0-0006    | 2           | N   | 67.32975  | -0.10306  |
2023143 | SHENG            | 16         | 4FGL J0436.8-5223    | 2           | N   | 69.2175   | -52.27764 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 17         | 4FGL J0450.3-4419    | 2           | N   | 72.50879  | -44.30586 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 18         | 4FGL J0501.0-2423    | 2           | N   | 75.30358  | -24.38378 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 19         | 4FGL J0533.1-6119    | 2           | N   | 83.68033  | -61.36281 |
2023143 | SHENG            | 20         | 4FGL J0533.3-5549    | 2           | N   | 83.35158  | -55.82681 |
2023146 | FUERST           | 1          | NGC 7793 P13         | 41          | N   | 359.46254 | -32.62406 |
2023148 | KENNEA           | 1          | MAXI TRANSIENT #1    | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023148 | KENNEA           | 2          | MAXI TRANSIENT #2    | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023148 | KENNEA           | 3          | MAXI TRANSIENT #3    | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023148 | KENNEA           | 4          | MAXI TRANSIENT #4    | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023148 | KENNEA           | 5          | MAXI TRANSIENT #5    | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023148 | KENNEA           | 6          | MAXI TRANSIENT #6    | 2           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023148 | KENNEA           | 7          | MAXI TRANSIENT #1    | 3.5         | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023153 | GOKUS            | 1          | HIGH-Z BLAZAR        | 63          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023156 | GUOLO            | 1          | SWIFT J0230+28       | 45          | N   | 37.57121  | 28.60119  |
2023162 | DHUGA            | 1          | NGC 3998             | 48          | N   | 179.48388 | 55.45358  |
2023162 | DHUGA            | 2          | NGC 7213             | 48          | N   | 332.31754 | -47.16669 |
2023163 | KENNEA           | 1          | GW EM CANDIDATE #1   | 70          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023163 | KENNEA           | 2          | GW EM CANDIDATE #2   | 70          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023163 | KENNEA           | 3          | GW EM CANDIDATE #3   | 70          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023165 | TUBIN            | 1          | 2MASS J11415445+0635 | 100         | N   | 175.47667 | 6.58614   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 1          | HOST-SN2016IPF       | 3           | N   | 121.80479 | 5.68325   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 2          | HOST-SN2016FFH       | 3           | N   | 227.95617 | 46.25089  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 3          | HOST-SN2016ELS       | 3           | N   | 307.558   | -10.9505  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 4          | HOST-SN2016CCJ       | 3           | N   | 257.59963 | 26.39664  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 5          | HOST-SN2016ASF       | 3           | N   | 102.65    | 31.11222  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 6          | HOST-SN2016P         | 3           | N   | 209.37958 | 6.0975    |
2023166 | BROWN            | 7          | HOST-SN2016X         | 3           | N   | 193.81458 | 0.09992   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 8          | HOST-SN2017IVV       | 3           | N   | 307.2075  | -4.38253  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 9          | HOST-SN2017HOQ       | 3           | N   | 79.83454  | -17.61158 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 10         | HOST-SN2017HZW       | 3           | N   | 31.32554  | 53.20372  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 11         | HOST-SN2017HJY       | 3           | N   | 39.01083  | 43.47208  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 12         | HOST-SN2017HXZ       | 3           | N   | 53.54587  | -13.93581 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 13         | HOST-SN2017HKY       | 3           | N   | 170.87713 | 63.3665   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 14         | HOST-SN2017FZW       | 3           | N   | 95.39487  | -27.21486 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 15         | HOST-SN2017GLQ       | 3           | N   | 32.11667  | 6.38794   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 16         | HOST-SN2017GVP       | 3           | N   | 355.44583 | -1.38472  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 17         | HOST-SN2017GIR       | 3           | N   | 24.93687  | -23.25478 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 18         | HOST-SN2017GCI       | 3           | N   | 101.68758 | -27.24883 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 19         | HOST-SN2017FAF       | 3           | N   | 263.66658 | 26.30611  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 20         | HOST-SN2017BC        | 3           | N   | 184.96167 | -6.85556  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 21         | HOST-SN2018CNI       | 3           | N   | 225.345   | -10.18056 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 22         | HOST-SN2018ATQ       | 3           | N   | 176.76717 | 19.55078  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 23         | HOST-SN2018BEK       | 3           | N   | 233.00646 | 68.24194  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 24         | HOST-SN2018BEH       | 3           | N   | 142.846   | 17.80775  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 25         | HOST-SN2018PV        | 3           | N   | 178.23208 | 36.98656  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 26         | HOST-SN2018PH        | 3           | N   | 122.75958 | 5.08719   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 27         | HOST-SN2018PC        | 3           | N   | 142.22967 | 49.23819  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 28         | HOST-SN2019UNB       | 3           | N   | 146.98754 | 0.82664   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 29         | HOST-SN2019TDF       | 3           | N   | 266.62075 | 30.70689  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 30         | HOST-SN2019LSM       | 3           | N   | 218.76067 | 14.77689  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 31         | HOST-SN2019GFM       | 3           | N   | 233.94413 | 24.06247  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 32         | HOST-SN2019HSW       | 3           | N   | 140.14042 | 64.07303  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 33         | HOST-SN2019BUT       | 3           | N   | 201.02942 | 8.92658   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 34         | HOST-SN2020ADOW      | 3           | N   | 128.42575 | 27.71203  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 35         | HOST-SN2020ABDR      | 3           | N   | 55.69788  | -12.28011 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 36         | HOST-SN2020FAA       | 3           | N   | 221.78971 | 72.73658  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 37         | HOST-SN2020ACMA      | 3           | N   | 159.49104 | -28.90853 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 38         | HOST-SN2020ESM       | 3           | N   | 211.826   | -5.12708  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 39         | HOST-SN2020ZNR       | 3           | N   | 109.77679 | 23.88539  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 40         | HOST-SN2020AATC      | 3           | N   | 42.06842  | -10.25206 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 41         | HOST-SN2020ZGL       | 3           | N   | 352.00479 | -2.16489  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 42         | HOST-SN2020ZBF       | 3           | N   | 29.50696  | -41.34772 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 43         | HOST-SN2020ZOQ       | 3           | N   | 159.08975 | 13.71914  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 44         | HOST-SN2020UEW       | 3           | N   | 49.84946  | -29.98492 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 45         | HOST-SN2020WTQ       | 3           | N   | 18.28371  | 28.67697  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 46         | HOST-SN2020TLD       | 3           | N   | 7.42312   | -51.53597 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 47         | HOST-SN2020PNI       | 3           | N   | 225.95817 | 42.11403  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 48         | HOST-SN2020NUB       | 3           | N   | 30.98367  | -23.31392 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 49         | HOST-SN2020HGW       | 3           | N   | 214.57975 | 38.9295   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 50         | HOST-SN2020CXD       | 3           | N   | 261.62192 | 71.09406  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 51         | HOST-SN2020IKQ       | 3           | N   | 204.02087 | 28.98339  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 52         | HOST-SN2019SMJ       | 3           | N   | 117.41967 | 5.07422   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 53         | HOST-SN2020DKO       | 3           | N   | 204.98779 | 0.82814   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 54         | HOST-SN2020UE        | 3           | N   | 190.69492 | 2.6595    |
2023166 | BROWN            | 55         | HOST-SN2019SZU       | 3           | N   | 2.55475   | -19.69233 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 56         | HOST-SN2021ACYA      | 3           | N   | 60.55733  | -28.39156 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 57         | HOST-SN2021AGBN      | 3           | N   | 59.30358  | -25.40339 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 58         | HOST-SN2021AFUR      | 3           | N   | 155.55417 | 17.86122  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 59         | HOST-SN2021AFCP      | 3           | N   | 160.37542 | -12.36631 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 60         | HOST-SN2021ZCL       | 3           | N   | 77.31021  | -6.05386  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 61         | HOST-SN2021ADLY      | 3           | N   | 172.17421 | 35.11264  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 62         | HOST-SN2021ADOU      | 3           | N   | 14.46379  | 9.63131   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 63         | HOST-SN2021ADLW      | 3           | N   | 175.32425 | 36.54297  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 64         | HOST-SN2021UVY       | 3           | N   | 7.37863   | 12.10586  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 65         | HOST-SN2021GNO       | 3           | N   | 183.04292 | 13.24917  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 66         | HOST-SN2021ABZE      | 3           | N   | 10.88442  | 14.34292  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 67         | HOST-SN2021ABPT      | 3           | N   | 96.48417  | 39.67372  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 68         | HOST-SN2021YKY       | 3           | N   | 16.95925  | 27.31481  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 69         | HOST-SN2021AABP      | 3           | N   | 347.47954 | 9.68581   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 70         | HOST-SN2021AAKL      | 3           | N   | 47.42467  | -4.58814  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 71         | HOST-SN2021YYG       | 3           | N   | 79.08758  | -13.47775 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 72         | HOST-SN2021ZET       | 3           | N   | 328.05562 | -23.37697 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 73         | HOST-SN2021YBC       | 3           | N   | 37.32929  | -4.68178  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 74         | HOST-SN2021GMJ       | 3           | N   | 159.69654 | 53.50861  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 75         | HOST-SN2021XJU       | 3           | N   | 305.629   | -53.27894 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 76         | HOST-SN2021UDS       | 3           | N   | 2.68379   | -63.10094 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 77         | HOST-SN2021XBG       | 3           | N   | 35.98521  | -6.70103  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 78         | HOST-SN2021WVD       | 3           | N   | 227.64575 | 13.45853  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 79         | HOST-SN2021UKT       | 3           | N   | 12.35358  | -1.76633  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 80         | HOST-SN2021UYC       | 3           | N   | 329.18892 | 27.90503  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 81         | HOST-SN2021UHK       | 3           | N   | 351.55667 | 1.14558   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 82         | HOST-SN2021VAZ       | 3           | N   | 85.50733  | 69.37669  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 83         | HOST-SN2021UQW       | 3           | N   | 328.49763 | 6.6975    |
2023166 | BROWN            | 84         | HOST-SN2021UOY       | 3           | N   | 343.90604 | 19.17383  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 85         | HOST-SN2021QWQ       | 3           | N   | 221.85225 | -22.40558 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 86         | HOST-SN2021QBC       | 3           | N   | 292.51092 | 35.04631  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 87         | HOST-SN2021NJK       | 3           | N   | 159.83938 | -29.58222 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 88         | HOST-SN2021MIM       | 3           | N   | 235.089   | 7.28153   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 89         | HOST-SN2021JBI       | 3           | N   | 199.66267 | -41.25336 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 90         | HOST-SN2021KYV       | 3           | N   | 216.98037 | 33.00208  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 91         | HOST-SN2020AEUH      | 3           | N   | 188.96608 | 37.70344  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 92         | HOST-SN2021KGJ       | 3           | N   | 183.53146 | -12.58803 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 93         | HOST-SN2021JPK       | 3           | N   | 219.75012 | 12.66944  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 94         | HOST-SN2021FMU       | 3           | N   | 157.98417 | -15.95547 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 95         | HOST-SN2021JAD       | 3           | N   | 83.34242  | -21.95181 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 96         | HOST-SN2021HKU       | 3           | N   | 308.00796 | -53.74953 |
2023166 | BROWN            | 97         | HOST-SN2021GHC       | 3           | N   | 149.13746 | 0.75228   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 98         | HOST-SN2021HEN       | 3           | N   | 196.93287 | 24.81053  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 99         | HOST-SN2021DOV       | 3           | N   | 134.07796 | -0.44214  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 100        | HOST-SN2020YWX       | 3           | N   | 178.35921 | 10.8965   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 101        | HOST-SN2020UDY       | 3           | N   | 31.70558  | 44.58758  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 102        | HOST-SN2021DWG       | 3           | N   | 214.56654 | 0.88842   |
2023166 | BROWN            | 103        | HOST-SN2020UEM       | 3           | N   | 126.09942 | -3.48864  |
2023166 | BROWN            | 104        | HOST-SN2021BHD       | 3           | N   | 207.06125 | 68.08969  |
2023170 | TORRES-ALBA      | 1          | FAVA_TARGET1         | 15          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023170 | TORRES-ALBA      | 2          | FAVA_TARGET2         | 15          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023176 | BORGHESE         | 1          | MAGNETAR OUTBURST    | 45          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 1          | ICECUBE TRIGGER #1   | 9.5         | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 2          | ICECUBE TRIGGER #2   | 9.5         | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 3          | ICECUBE TRIGGER #3   | 18.5        | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 4          | KM3NET TRIGGER #1    | 3.5         | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 5          | KM3NET TRIGGER #2    | 9.5         | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 6          | NEUTRINO CANDIDATE   | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 7          | NEUTRINO CANDIDATE   | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 8          | NEUTRINO CANDIDATE   | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 9          | NEUTRINO CANDIDATE   | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023180 | KENNEA           | 10         | NEUTRINO CANDIDATE   | 1           | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023182 | BUSON            | 1          | 5BZQ J1327+5008      | 5           | N   | 201.85467 | 50.147    |
2023182 | BUSON            | 2          | 5BZQ J0808+4950      | 5           | N   | 122.16521 | 49.84361  |
2023182 | BUSON            | 3          | 5BZB J1122+4316      | 15          | N   | 170.54921 | 43.28047  |
2023182 | BUSON            | 4          | 5BZQ J1243+4043      | 15          | N   | 190.98242 | 40.73292  |
2023182 | BUSON            | 5          | 5BZB J1210+3929      | 15          | N   | 182.61113 | 39.48583  |
2023182 | BUSON            | 6          | 5BZQ J1617+3801      | 15          | N   | 244.45171 | 38.02828  |
2023182 | BUSON            | 7          | 5BZB J1150+2417      | 5           | N   | 177.58004 | 24.29828  |
2023182 | BUSON            | 8          | 5BZQ J0312+0133      | 15          | N   | 48.18167  | 1.55489   |
2023182 | BUSON            | 9          | 5BZQ J0256-2137      | 15          | N   | 44.0535   | -21.62475 |
2023182 | BUSON            | 10         | 5BZB J2243-0609      | 15          | N   | 340.7865  | -6.15072  |
2023182 | BUSON            | 11         | 5BZB J0630-2406      | 5           | N   | 97.74796  | -24.11283 |
2023192 | LUNA             | 1          | T CRB                | 134         | Y   | 239.87567 | 25.92017  |
2023196 | RAVI             | 1          | DLT_1                | 36          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023196 | RAVI             | 2          | DLT_2                | 36          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023196 | RAVI             | 3          | DLT_3                | 36          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023196 | RAVI             | 4          | DLT_4                | 36          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023196 | RAVI             | 5          | DLT_5                | 36          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023206 | PRINCE           | 1          | J114447.77-430859.3  | 108         | N   | 176.199   | -43.15    |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 1          | TRANSIENT_01         | 4           | N   | 0.0385    | -77.341   |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 2          | TRANSIENT_02         | 4           | N   | 67.1615   | -0.011    |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 3          | TRANSIENT_03         | 4           | N   | 74.565    | -52.034   |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 4          | TRANSIENT_04         | 4           | N   | 100.04858 | -25.89581 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 5          | TRANSIENT_05         | 4           | N   | 201.88492 | -27.87189 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 6          | TRANSIENT_06         | 4           | N   | 201.96421 | 6.71381   |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 7          | TRANSIENT_07         | 4           | N   | 202.6255  | 6.81419   |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 8          | TRANSIENT_08         | 4           | N   | 272.64958 | -81.33969 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 9          | TRANSIENT_10         | 4           | N   | 48.37779  | -30.131   |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 10         | TRANSIENT_11         | 4           | N   | 44.87729  | -24.38089 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 11         | TRANSIENT_12         | 4           | N   | 62.192    | -38.85869 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 12         | TRANSIENT_13         | 4           | N   | 63.4085   | -21.868   |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 13         | TRANSIENT_14         | 4           | N   | 68.1585   | -57.83581 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 14         | TRANSIENT_15         | 4           | N   | 128.1055  | 37.12661  |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 15         | TRANSIENT_16         | 4           | N   | 139.60829 | 16.3055   |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 16         | TRANSIENT_17         | 4           | N   | 160.70946 | 25.77119  |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 17         | TRANSIENT_18         | 4           | N   | 169.93971 | -46.12539 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 18         | TRANSIENT_19         | 4           | N   | 190.118   | -23.15769 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 19         | TRANSIENT_20         | 4           | N   | 196.29158 | -3.5355   |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 20         | TRANSIENT_21         | 4           | N   | 290.36671 | -50.46519 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 21         | TRANSIENT_22         | 4           | N   | 189.28221 | 10.96311  |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 22         | TRANSIENT_23         | 4           | N   | 358.08079 | -55.92481 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 23         | TRANSIENT_24         | 4           | N   | 27.0875   | -37.67219 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 24         | TRANSIENT_25         | 4           | N   | 28.3175   | -47.97319 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 25         | TRANSIENT_26         | 4           | N   | 120.681   | 31.06731  |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 26         | TRANSIENT_27         | 4           | N   | 194.71442 | 23.92431  |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 27         | TRANSIENT_30         | 4           | N   | 14.415    | -85.12239 |
2023217 | KRUMPE           | 28         | TRANSIENT_01         | 4           | N   | 118.9475  | -1.96161  |
2023221 | HERNANDEZ-GARCIA | 1          | AT2021HDR            | 156         | N   | 321.00129 | 34.15322  |
2023227 | SANTANDER        | 1          | NEUTRINO TARGET1     | 12          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023227 | SANTANDER        | 2          | NEUTRINO TARGET2     | 12          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023233 | MARCOTULLI       | 1          | SDSS J015719.56+1016 | 9           | N   | 29.3315   | 10.27689  |
2023233 | MARCOTULLI       | 2          | SDSS J131906.79+2533 | 9           | N   | 199.77829 | 25.56642  |
2023233 | MARCOTULLI       | 3          | SDSS J142355.54+4928 | 10          | N   | 215.98146 | 49.46992  |
2023233 | MARCOTULLI       | 4          | SDSS J095136.96+2022 | 15          | N   | 147.90404 | 20.37133  |
2023233 | MARCOTULLI       | 5          | SDSS J101449.67+6128 | 18          | N   | 153.707   | 61.47133  |
2023236 | KYNOCH           | 1          | PDS 456              | 127         | N   | 262.08246 | -14.26553 |
2023238 | LEVINE           | 1          | WASP-69              | 30          | N   | 315.02583 | -5.09444  |
2023240 | YOUNG            | 1          | ACHLYS               | 19.1        | N   | 15.59808  | 20.55919  |
2023240 | YOUNG            | 2          | UGC5709              | 6.5         | N   | 157.81767 | 19.383    |
2023240 | YOUNG            | 3          | F563-V2              | 3.3         | N   | 133.26596 | 18.43594  |
2023240 | YOUNG            | 4          | UGC11557             | 6.5         | N   | 306.00292 | 60.19472  |
2023240 | YOUNG            | 5          | 2MFGC731             | 1           | N   | 15.09075  | 19.83625  |
2023243 | BODEWITS         | 1          | C/2023 A3            | 27          | N   | 0         | 0         |
2023261 | SOKOLOSKI        | 1          | T CRB                | 140         | N   | 239.87567 | 25.92017  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 1          | AT2019AZH            | 2           | N   | 123.32058 | 22.64831  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 2          | AT2022DBL            | 2           | N   | 185.18779 | 49.55128  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 3          | AT2018ZR             | 2           | N   | 119.22729 | 34.26211  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 4          | AT2018BSI            | 2           | N   | 123.86092 | 45.59219  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 5          | AT2018HCO            | 2           | N   | 16.89012  | 23.47617  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 6          | AT2018IIH            | 2           | N   | 262.01629 | 30.69206  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 7          | AT2018HYZ            | 2           | N   | 151.712   | 1.69278   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 8          | AT2018LNA            | 2           | N   | 105.82771 | 23.02908  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 9          | AT2019DSG            | 2           | N   | 314.26229 | 14.2045   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 10         | AT2019EHZ            | 2           | N   | 212.4245  | 55.49111  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 11         | AT2019QIZ            | 2           | N   | 71.65783  | -10.22631 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 12         | AT2019VCB            | 2           | N   | 189.73479 | 33.16586  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 13         | AT2020PJ             | 2           | N   | 232.89571 | 33.09489  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 14         | AT2022GRI            | 2           | N   | 109.5865  | 33.99486  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 15         | AT2020MOT            | 2           | N   | 7.80625   | 85.00881  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 16         | AT2020NEH            | 2           | N   | 230.33371 | 14.06958  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 17         | AT2020NOV            | 2           | N   | 254.55408 | 2.1175    |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 18         | AT2020VWL            | 2           | N   | 232.6575  | 26.98242  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 19         | AT2020WEY            | 2           | N   | 136.35779 | 61.80256  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 20         | AT2020ZSO            | 2           | N   | 335.57129 | -7.26636  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 21         | AT2020ACKA           | 2           | N   | 238.75808 | 16.30453  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 22         | AT2021AXU            | 2           | N   | 176.6515  | 30.08542  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 23         | AT2021EHB            | 2           | N   | 46.94925  | 40.31133  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 24         | AT2021JJM            | 2           | N   | 219.87771 | -27.8585  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 25         | AT2021MHG            | 2           | N   | 4.92871   | 29.31686  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 26         | AT2021NWA            | 2           | N   | 238.46371 | 55.58878  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 27         | AT2021SDU            | 2           | N   | 17.84958  | 50.57489  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 28         | AT2021YZV            | 2           | N   | 105.2775  | 40.82517  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 29         | AT2022AEE            | 2           | N   | 132.18008 | 80.88328  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 30         | AT2022RZ             | 2           | N   | 234.49    | 56.27161  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 31         | AT2022ADM            | 2           | N   | 216.96429 | 28.17478  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 32         | AT2022BDW            | 2           | N   | 126.29308 | 18.58264  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 33         | AT2022ARB            | 2           | N   | 156.043   | -0.823    |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 34         | AT2022EXR            | 2           | N   | 262.46042 | 25.84217  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 35         | AT2022IBQ            | 2           | N   | 267.64908 | 21.27497  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 36         | AT2022HVP            | 2           | N   | 148.6885  | 55.44036  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 37         | AT2022PNA            | 2           | N   | 25.48142  | -3.28961  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 38         | AT2022LRI            | 2           | N   | 35.03338  | -22.72089 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 39         | AT2022UPJ            | 2           | N   | 5.98692   | -14.42319 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 40         | AT2022WTN            | 2           | N   | 350.84908 | 10.6855   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 41         | AT2023CVB            | 2           | N   | 288.607   | 41.66925  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 42         | AT2023MHS            | 2           | N   | 205.81529 | 19.25025  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 43         | AT2018LNI            | 2           | N   | 62.40688  | 73.89492  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 44         | AT2019EVE            | 2           | N   | 172.20687 | 15.67286  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 45         | AT2019MHA            | 2           | N   | 244.11583 | 56.43231  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 46         | AT2019MEG            | 2           | N   | 281.31742 | 44.43867  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 47         | AT2018JBV            | 2           | N   | 197.68983 | 8.56786   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 48         | AT2019TEQ            | 2           | N   | 284.77292 | 47.51825  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 49         | AT2020DDV            | 2           | N   | 149.63904 | 46.91119  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 50         | AT2020OPY            | 2           | N   | 239.10721 | 23.37253  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 51         | AT2020MBQ            | 2           | N   | 235.06367 | 25.00136  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 52         | AT2020QHS            | 2           | N   | 34.47487  | -9.61414  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 53         | AT2020YSG            | 2           | N   | 171.35842 | 27.44061  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 54         | AT2019BAF            | 2           | N   | 268.00063 | 65.62667  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 55         | AT2019CMW            | 2           | N   | 282.16446 | 51.01353  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 56         | AT2020VDQ            | 2           | N   | 152.22267 | 42.71672  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 57         | AT2020YUE            | 2           | N   | 165.00137 | 21.11272  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 58         | AT2021QTH            | 2           | N   | 302.91221 | -21.16017 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 59         | AT2021UQV            | 2           | N   | 8.16617   | 22.54889  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 60         | AT2021UTQ            | 2           | N   | 229.62117 | 73.35872  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 61         | AT2021YTE            | 2           | N   | 103.76971 | 12.63417  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 62         | AT2020ADGM           | 2           | N   | 63.26021  | -53.07269 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 63         | AT2018DYB            | 2           | N   | 242.74487 | -60.92311 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 64         | AT2023CLX            | 2           | N   | 175.03917 | 15.32736  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 65         | AT2022DSB            | 2           | N   | 235.59058 | -22.67056 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 66         | AT2019AHK            | 2           | N   | 105.04812 | -66.04003 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 67         | AT2020KSF            | 2           | N   | 323.86358 | -18.27653 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 68         | AT2022FPX            | 2           | N   | 232.76542 | 53.40536  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 69         | AT2022CZY            | 2           | N   | 185.50471 | 16.99556  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 70         | AT2021UVZ            | 2           | N   | 263.21046 | 33.03289  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 71         | AT2021JSG            | 2           | N   | 167.15296 | 30.76128  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 72         | AT2021GJE            | 2           | N   | 252.53054 | 34.81883  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 73         | AT2021BLZ            | 2           | N   | 68.13021  | -32.43067 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 74         | AT2021ACK            | 2           | N   | 208.29162 | 9.74036   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 75         | SRGE J013204.6+12223 | 2           | N   | 23.01867  | 12.37656  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 76         | SRGE J021939.9+36181 | 2           | N   | 34.91625  | 36.30506  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 77         | SRGE J071310.6+72562 | 2           | N   | 108.29383 | 72.94075  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 78         | SRGE J091747.6+52482 | 2           | N   | 139.4475  | 52.80564  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 79         | SRGE J095928.6+64302 | 2           | N   | 149.86867 | 64.50606  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 80         | SRGE J133053.3+73482 | 2           | N   | 202.72092 | 73.80675  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 81         | SRGE J135514.8+31160 | 2           | N   | 208.81258 | 31.26811  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 82         | SRGE J144738.4+67182 | 2           | N   | 221.91279 | 67.30508  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 83         | SRGE J153503.4+45505 | 2           | N   | 233.76317 | 45.84861  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 84         | SRGE J161001.2+33012 | 2           | N   | 242.50592 | 33.02242  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 85         | SRGE J163030.2+47012 | 2           | N   | 247.62604 | 47.02372  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 86         | SRGE J163831.7+53402 | 2           | N   | 249.63342 | 53.67294  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 87         | SRGE J171423.6+08523 | 2           | N   | 258.59838 | 8.87692   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 88         | 2XMM J123103.2+11064 | 2           | N   | 187.7625  | 11.1135   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 89         | 2XMMI J184725.1-6317 | 2           | N   | 281.85417 | -63.29028 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 90         | 3XMM J150052.0+01545 | 2           | N   | 225.21667 | 1.91494   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 91         | 3XMM J215022.4-05510 | 2           | N   | 327.59167 | -5.85222  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 92         | ASASSN-14AE          | 2           | N   | 167.16667 | 34.09783  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 93         | ASASSN-14LI          | 2           | N   | 192.0625  | 17.774    |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 94         | ASASSN-15LH          | 2           | N   | 330.5625  | -61.65972 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 95         | ASASSN-15OI          | 2           | N   | 309.7875  | -30.75556 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 96         | ASASSN-20IL          | 2           | N   | 75.79583  | -22.81444 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 97         | AT2017EQX            | 2           | N   | 336.7     | 17.14778  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 98         | CSS100217            | 2           | N   | 157.30417 | 40.7055   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 99         | D23H-1               | 2           | N   | 353       | 0.28739   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 100        | D3-13                | 2           | N   | 214.875   | 52.86844  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 101        | DES14C1KIA           | 2           | N   | 53.69583  | -26.32639 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 102        | DOUGIE               | 2           | N   | 182.2     | 43.02231  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 103        | F01004-2237          | 2           | N   | 15.70833  | -22.36583 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 104        | IPTF16AXA            | 2           | N   | 255.89167 | 30.5935   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 105        | IPTF16FNL            | 2           | N   | 7.4875    | 32.89367  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 106        | J155223              | 2           | N   | 238.09583 | 32.58197  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 107        | NGC 3599             | 2           | N   | 168.8625  | 18.11036  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 108        | NGC 5905             | 2           | N   | 228.84583 | 55.51711  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 109        | OGLE16AAA            | 2           | N   | 16.8375   | -64.2725  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 110        | OGLE17AAJ            | 2           | N   | 29.10417  | -71.07111 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 111        | PS1-10ADI            | 2           | N   | 310.6875  | 15.50892  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 112        | PS1-10JH             | 2           | N   | 242.36667 | 53.67333  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 113        | PS1-11AF             | 2           | N   | 149.3625  | 3.23358   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 114        | PS1-13JW             | 2           | N   | 131.225   | 42.96244  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 115        | PTF09AXC             | 2           | N   | 223.30417 | 22.24231  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 116        | PTF09DJL             | 2           | N   | 248.48333 | 30.23794  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 117        | PTF09GE              | 2           | N   | 224.2625  | 49.61139  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 118        | PTF10IYA             | 2           | N   | 219.67083 | 37.65931  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 119        | RX J1242-11A         | 2           | N   | 190.65417 | -11.32639 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 120        | RX J1420+53          | 2           | N   | 215.1     | 53.56992  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 121        | SDSSJ0159            | 2           | N   | 29.99167  | 0.55292   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 122        | SDSSJ0952            | 2           | N   | 148.04167 | 21.72033  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 123        | SDSSJ1201+30         | 2           | N   | 180.4     | 30.05153  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 124        | SDSSJ1311            | 2           | N   | 197.84167 | -1.39611  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 125        | SDSSJ1323            | 2           | N   | 200.925   | 48.45036  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 126        | SDSSJ1342            | 2           | N   | 205.68333 | 5.51558   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 127        | SDSSJ1350            | 2           | N   | 207.50833 | 29.26936  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 128        | SN2017BCC            | 2           | N   | 172.97083 | 29.99578  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 129        | SWIFT J1112-82       | 2           | N   | 167.95    | -82.64583 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 130        | SWIFT J1644+57       | 2           | N   | 251.20417 | 57.58083  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 131        | SWIFT J2058+05       | 2           | N   | 314.58333 | 5.22583   |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 132        | TDE2                 | 2           | N   | 350.95417 | -1.13611  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 133        | WINGS J134849.88+263 | 2           | N   | 207.20833 | 26.59931  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 134        | XMMSL1 J024916.6-041 | 2           | N   | 42.32083  | -4.21444  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 135        | XMMSL1 J061927.1-655 | 2           | N   | 94.8625   | -65.88528 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 136        | XMMSL1 J0740-85      | 2           | N   | 199.96667 | 22.99944  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 137        | XMMSL1 J131952.3+225 | 2           | N   | 97.69167  | -60.51944 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 138        | XMMSL2 J140446.9-251 | 2           | N   | 211.19583 | -25.19306 |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 139        | XMMSL2 J144605.0+685 | 2           | N   | 221.52083 | 68.95861  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 140        | SDSS J143359.16+4006 | 2           | N   | 218.4965  | 40.11     |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 141        | ERASST J074426.3+291 | 2           | N   | 116.10888 | 29.26872  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 142        | XMMSL1 J074008.2-853 | 2           | N   | 115.03417 | -85.6575  |
2023265 | CHAKRABORTY      | 143        | SDSS J152717.95+1645 | 2           | N   | 231.82479 | 16.75081  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 1          | GAIA01               | 4.1         | N   | 142.12713 | -17.59472 |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 2          | GAIA02               | 4.1         | N   | 218.37858 | -1.24528  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 3          | GAIA03               | 4.1         | N   | 151.83988 | 34.13992  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 4          | GAIA04               | 4.1         | N   | 185.05342 | 58.68789  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 5          | GAIA05               | 4.1         | N   | 198.37092 | 41.865    |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 6          | GAIA06               | 4.1         | N   | 277.93171 | -1.3165   |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 7          | GAIA07               | 4.1         | N   | 226.47837 | 71.13442  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 8          | GAIA08               | 4.1         | N   | 321.90708 | 33.27331  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 9          | GAIA09               | 4.1         | N   | 162.24767 | 65.79878  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 10         | GAIA10               | 4.1         | N   | 326.73571 | 33.47053  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 11         | GAIA12               | 4.1         | N   | 133.35496 | 79.35525  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 12         | GAIA13               | 4.1         | N   | 337.21392 | -39.72192 |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 13         | GAIA14               | 4.1         | N   | 108.794   | -34.50367 |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 14         | GAIA15               | 4.1         | N   | 151.78671 | 44.89661  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 15         | GAIA16               | 4.1         | N   | 213.831   | -66.59961 |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 16         | GAIA17               | 4.1         | N   | 99.94917  | -36.93097 |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 17         | GAIA18               | 4.1         | N   | 264.98358 | 45.03814  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 18         | GAIA19               | 4.1         | N   | 34.21296  | -53.36164 |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 19         | GAIA20               | 4.1         | N   | 232.72208 | -42.84267 |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 20         | GAIA21               | 4.1         | N   | 308.31358 | 7.97944   |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 21         | GAIA22               | 4.1         | N   | 285.68712 | 13.06367  |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 22         | GAIA23               | 4.1         | N   | 112.68479 | -30.46056 |
2023269 | FOLEY            | 23         | GAIA24               | 4.1         | N   | 218.08621 | -10.36636 |
2023278 | CHORNOCK         | 1          | TDE1                 | 18          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023278 | CHORNOCK         | 2          | TDE2                 | 18          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023278 | CHORNOCK         | 3          | TDE3                 | 18          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023278 | CHORNOCK         | 4          | TDE4                 | 18          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023278 | CHORNOCK         | 5          | TDE5                 | 18          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023278 | CHORNOCK         | 6          | TDE6                 | 18          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 1          | HIGH PRIORITY TDE    | 20          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 2          | HIGH PRIORITY TDE    | 20          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 3          | HIGH PRIORITY TDE    | 20          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 4          | LOW PRIORITY TDE     | 10          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 5          | LOW PRIORITY TDE     | 10          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 6          | LOW PRIORITY TDE     | 10          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 7          | LOW PRIORITY TDE     | 10          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 8          | LOW PRIORITY TDE     | 10          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 9          | LOW PRIORITY TDE     | 10          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023281 | EYLES-FERRIS     | 10         | LOW PRIORITY TDE     | 10          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023284 | ISLAM            | 1          | 4U 1538-52           | 40          | N   | 235.59729 | -52.386   |
2023284 | ISLAM            | 2          | 4U 1909+07           | 40          | N   | 287.70079 | 7.59761   |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 1          | SN2022JOX            | 3           | N   | 149.4355  | -28.51586 |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 2          | SN2021YKY            | 3           | N   | 16.95925  | 27.31481  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 3          | SN2020LFN            | 3           | N   | 246.73704 | 20.24589  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 4          | SN2020HGW            | 3           | N   | 214.57971 | 38.92956  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 5          | SN2020IAK            | 3           | N   | 199.34537 | 32.58853  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 6          | SN2019EOH            | 3           | N   | 195.95563 | 38.28914  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 7          | SN2023ENR            | 3           | N   | 82.91646  | -10.393   |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 8          | SN2023AXU            | 3           | N   | 101.4805  | -18.23153 |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 9          | SN2022PGF            | 3           | N   | 227.92458 | 59.82008  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 10         | SN2021YJA            | 3           | N   | 51.08825  | -21.56561 |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 11         | SN2022PRR            | 3           | N   | 285.42458 | 40.75103  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 12         | SN2021UDS            | 3           | N   | 2.68379   | -63.10094 |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 13         | SN2022XXF            | 3           | N   | 172.52475 | 9.28261   |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 14         | SN2016P              | 3           | N   | 209.37958 | 6.0975    |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 15         | SN2020ADOW           | 3           | N   | 128.42608 | 27.71211  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 16         | SN2020ZGL            | 3           | N   | 352.00479 | -2.16489  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 17         | SN2021EK             | 3           | N   | 50.95796  | -10.04478 |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 18         | SN2022CVZ            | 3           | N   | 176.48763 | 5.86153   |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 19         | SN2023GPW            | 3           | N   | 195.57792 | -5.85303  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 20         | SN2022ABLQ           | 3           | N   | 183.277   | 17.09894  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 21         | SN2022EUX            | 3           | N   | 88.88013  | -15.67619 |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 22         | SN2021JPK            | 3           | N   | 219.75012 | 12.66944  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 23         | SN2019LSM            | 3           | N   | 218.76063 | 14.77692  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 24         | SN2016EDK            | 3           | N   | 266.80917 | 30.22481  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 25         | SN2023IUC            | 3           | N   | 219.73183 | 2.28728   |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 26         | SN2021CKJ            | 3           | N   | 136.46283 | -8.58544  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 27         | AT2022BDW            | 3           | N   | 126.29317 | 18.58264  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 28         | AT2022ADM            | 3           | N   | 216.96433 | 28.17472  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 29         | AT2021YTE            | 3           | N   | 103.76971 | 12.63417  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 30         | AT2021GJE            | 3           | N   | 252.53054 | 34.81883  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 31         | AT2021ACK            | 3           | N   | 208.29162 | 9.74036   |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 32         | AT2020WEY            | 3           | N   | 136.35783 | 61.80256  |
2023287 | PELLEGRINO       | 33         | AT2023LLI            | 3           | N   | 344.4145  | 40.54464  |
2023288 | LIN              | 1          | HLX-1_2MASXJ0111-45  | 36          | N   | 17.69583  | -46.02556 |
2023290 | WANG             | 1          | SN                   | 15          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023290 | WANG             | 2          | SN                   | 15          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023290 | WANG             | 3          | SN                   | 15          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023290 | WANG             | 4          | SN                   | 12          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023290 | WANG             | 5          | SN                   | 12          | Y   | 0         | 0         |
2023290 | WANG             | 6          | SN                   | 6           | Y   | 0         | 0         |

Proposal Abstracts

2023010 / MARGUTTI / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY), USA

"A STUDY OF SUPER-LUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE ACROSS THE SPECTRUM"

With peak luminosities Lpk~10^45 erg s-1, the class of Super-Luminous supernovae (SLSNe) are ~ 10-100 more luminous than ordinary explosions, and represent the death of very massive stars. The nature of their exceptional luminosities is still unclear and require exotic explosion mechanisms and/or peculiar sources of energy. Here we propose rapid Swift follow up of 2 newly-discovered SLSNe to map the UV and X-ray emission during the early evolutionary stages as part of our multi-wavelength effort through programs on the VLA, Chandra, XMM and optical/NIR facilities. The final aim is to: (i) Pin down the SLSNe energy source; (ii) Map the diversity of SLSNe progenitor stars and pre-explosion evolution.

2023011 / MARGUTTI / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY), USA

"TESTING THE LIMIT: SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE FASTEST EXPLOSIONS"

Fast and Blue Optical Transients (FBOTs) are a new class of transients. With extremely rapid time scales of evolution and luminous emission, FBOTs probe the extremes of the explosion parameters and/or stellar progenitor properties, and are hard to reconcile within the traditional supernova models. Alternative scenarios include strong shock interaction with a dense medium, or the presence of a central engine (e.g. BH or magnetar, either already existing, or formed by the explosion). Here we propose a focused investigation of the closest FBOTs (d<=300 Mpc) with Swift as part of our extensive multi-wavelength monitoring program (radio to X-rays). By densely sampling the UV and X-ray properties of FBOTs with Swift, our overarching goal is to advance our understanding of their intrinsic nature.

2023019 / HOMAN / EUREKA SCIENTIFIC INC., USA

"OBSERVING THE EARLY RISE OF X-RAY TRANSIENTS WITH SWIFT"

Observing campaigns of black hole and neutron star X-ray transients have long relied on triggers from X-ray all-sky monitors or wide-field cameras. Due to the limited sensitivity of these instruments, the early rising phase of outbursts is typically missed. Here we propose a Swift monitoring program of known transient LMXBs that is triggered by detections of optical outburst activity with the Faulkes Telescopes/XB-NEWS. This allows us to catch transients as they emerge from quiescence in UV and X-rays. Our aim is to test the disk-instability model in LMXBs, follow the early X-ray spectral/variability evolution of an outburst, and search for signs of extended absorbing structures. We request monitoring campaigns for two transients, each with 10 (2 ks) observations at a 2-day cadence.

2023027 / PARSOTAN / NASA/GSFC, USA

"INCREASING THE RATE OF WELL-LOCALIZED TRANSIENTS WITH BAT-GUANO"

The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is a unique instrument which has the capability to detect high energy transients and provide small localization regions that can be quickly searched for long lasting electromagnetic counterpart emission. The GUANO and NITRATES pipelines can be leveraged to extend the capability of Swift BAT to localize events that do not trigger the instrument. This will result in a larger number of arcminute localized transients permitting large telescope facilities to conduct follow-up observations and significantly advance our understanding of these events. Here, we propose to improve the GUANO/NITRATES pipelines to streamline the localization efforts that are critical to follow-up observations of transient sources.

2023033 / LAHA / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (BALTIMORE COUNTY), USA

"SWIFT MONITORING OF A CHANGING-LOOK AGN WITH A NEWLY-LAUNCHED RADIO JET"

1ES 1927+654 is one of the most enigmatic changing-look AGN which exhibited a major outburst in the optical/UV in Dec 2017 followed by a vanishing X-ray corona in Aug-Oct 2018. Since May 2022 the source has shown a rise in the soft X-ray flux (as of Sept 2023 has reached SIX times the pre-flare value). In conjunction with the soft X-ray flare, from Feb-July 2023 the 5GHz core (< 1 pc, unresolved) radio flux of the source sharply increased by a factor of 35 times, from 2 mJy to 70 mJy, a unique event of a radio-quiet source becoming radio-loud in a matter of a few months, along with the presence of a new nascent jet. Our proposed program with Swift (1ks snapshot, once-a-week, for next 1 year) intends to track the source X-ray + UV emission along with the radio flare that is still ongoing.

2023036 / LAHA / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (BALTIMORE COUNTY), USA

"SWIFT+FAST SIMULTANEOUS TOO OBSERVATIONS OF REPEATING FAST RADIO BURSTS."

The fast radio bursts (FRBs) are milli-second duration radio transients, the origin of which is still debated. To understand the origin of the FRBs we will monitor the two crucial aspects during their bursting phases: (A)Polarization signatures in radio-band with FAST telescope, and (B) detect any possible X-ray counterpart corresponding to the FRBs with Swift. Repeating FRBs are very well localized and their ephemeris known, hence serve as the most ideal candidates for this purpose. The FAST radio telescope monitors several repeating FRBs regularly, such as FRBs 20121102A, 20180301A, 20190520B, 20190303A, 20190417A, 20201124A etc. FAST will supply us with the trigger for the proposed Swift+ FAST simultaneous ToO observations for any TWO repeating FRBs in the next cycle.

2023037 / CHERNYAKOVA / DUBLIN CITY UNIVERSITY, IRELAND

"SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF PSR B1259-63 DURING ITS 2024 PERIASTRON PASSAGE."

This proposal is to use Swift to observe the 2024 periastron passage of PSR B1259-63 within the framework of a large multi-wavelength campaign (MeerKAT, ATCA, SALT, VLT, FERMI), where radio extensive monitoring with MeerKAT has already been approved with a high priority. Such a campaign will allow us to study the structure of the Be star disk, and the details of the interaction of the pulsar wind and the stellar wind.

2023048 / JONKER / UNIVERSITEIT NETH

"AUTOMATED SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF EINSTEIN PROBE-DISCOVERED EXTRA-GALACTIC FAST X-RAY TRANSIENTS"

Einstein Probe (EP) is scheduled for launch in Dec 2023. It is predicted to discover about 10 extra-galactic Fast X-ray Transients (FXTs) per year and it will quickly (<15 minutes) announce them. FXTs have been proposed to be caused by binary neutron star mergers, tidal disruption events involving an intermediate-mass black hole, or supernova shock break-out (SN SBO). While more than 30 FXTs have been found to date, a multi-wavelength counterpart has been found for only one of these (the SBO from SN2008D). We propose to obtain rapid Swift follow-up of EP-discovered FXTs. This will facilitate arcsecond localisation and accurate light curves and spectra, which are crucial to determine the nature of these enigmatic transients.

2023050 / EVANS / UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER, UK

"FOLLOW UP OF NEW X-RAY TRANSIENTS DETECTED BY SWIFT"

In 2022, the Swift-XRT team launched a new service, the 'Living Swift-XRT Point Source Catalogue' (LSXPS), comprising a constantly-updated catalog and near real-time transient detector (Evans et al. 2023). This service has already produced high-impact science thanks to rapid follow-up with Swift, which revealed the first quasi-periodic eruptions from a galactic nucleus with a timescale of ~a month (Evans et al., 2023b, Guolo et al., 2023), a result only possible because of the rapid discovery of the transient and the rapidly-initiated follow up. We propose to observe more newly-detected transients found by LSXPS across X-ray, UV and optical wavelengths, to classify the events, constrain their physics, and motivate follow up with other facilities and wavelengths.

2023066 / CORSI / TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY, USA

"A SEARCH FOR NEARBY SNE IC-BL WITH X-RAY AFTERGLOWS"

Multi-wavelength (from radio to X-rays) studies of of stripped-envelope core-collapse core-collapse supernovae (SNe) with broad lines (type Ic-BL) are starting to suggest that a fraction of these explosions may be accompanied by trans-relativistic ejecta compatible with those expected in the so-called choked jet scenario. Choked-jet SNe are thought to be powered by jets that successfully escape from their progenitor cores but are subsequently smothered in stellar materials. Such choked jets may explain trans-relativistic SNe and provide a unified picture of SNe Ic-BL and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here, we request to carry out follow-up observations of three nearby SNe Ic-BL using the Neil Gehrels Swift observatory in search for jet-powered events.

2023080 / DEGENAAR / UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM, NETH

"COMPLETING 20 YEARS OF SWIFT MONITORING OF THE GALACTIC CENTER"

The center of our Galaxy has been monitored with the Swift/XRT almost every day since 2006. The high cadence provides excellent means to capture X-ray flares from Sgr A*, to study the accretion properties of 16 transient X-ray binaries, and to discover new X-ray transients. We propose to continue this Swift legacy program in cycles 20-21 and request daily 1-ks observations that amount to 490 ks of total exposure time. Our main objectives are to: 1) collect and study new flares from Sgr A*, 2) to detect any changes in the flaring rate or persistent emission of the supermassive black hole, and 3) to apply accretion models to very-faint X-ray binaries to determine their disk sizes. Many other topics can be addressed by this program, so it is highly valuable for a broad community.

2023081 / NUNEZ / COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, USA

"GROUP-X, A NEW LABORATORY FOR INVESTIGATING THE ACTIVITY-ROTATION RELATION"

Open clusters are one of the best laboratories for examining the dependence of magnetic activity on rotation for stars with solar mass or less. For potentially habitable Earth-like planets, likely to be discovered orbiting such stars, it is essential to understand the high-energy environments in which they form. We propose to observe low-mass members of Group-X, a recently discovered open cluster ~100 pc away and ~300 Myr old, an age at which we still lack strong constraints on the coronal activity-rotation relation. We used light curves from optical surveys to measure rotation periods for 165 low-mass (from late-F to mid-M) members of the cluster. Our Swift data will make Group-X a critical new benchmark as we seek to map out the magnetic behavior of low-mass stars over their first 1 Gyr.

2023083 / DEGENAAR / UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM, NETH

"THE NATURE AND ACCRETION FLOW PROPERTIES OF SUB-LUMINOUS X-RAY BINARIES"

Very-faint X-ray transients exhibit accretion outbursts with a peak X-ray luminosity much lower than that of other black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries. These objects trace a poorly understood accretion regime and may represent a missing population of short-period binaries or neutron stars that act as magnetic propellers. We propose 50 ks of Swift ToO monitoring and 14h of VLA radio observations to study the outbursts of two very-faint X-ray transients. These data are complemented by optical monitoring with rapidly schedulable 1-2 m telescopes and nIR spectroscopy with 8-m class telescopes. We aim to study the properties of their accretion in/outflow, elucidate the nature of individual sources, and ultimately determine the fractions of different types of systems among the population.

2023085 / ARCODIA / MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, USA

"SWIFT-XRT FOLLOW-UP OF EROSITA QPE CANDIDATES SELECTED THROUGH X-RAY VARIABILITY"

Galaxies emitting X-ray Quasi-Periodic Eruptions (QPEs) from their center represent the new frontier of X-ray variable accretion onto massive black holes. To date, only 4 bona-fide QPE sources are publicly known. We aim to increase this number by following up 3 new QPE candidates selected based on their X-ray variability with eROSITA. We designed the ideal XRT monitoring to confirm their nature, which amounts to 70.4ks in total.

2023095 / NOTSU / UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, USA

"SIMULTANEOUS SWIFT/UVOT NUV PHOTOMETRY WITH THE HST TREASURY PROGRAM NUV SPECTROSCOPY AND TESS PHOTOMETRY"

We request Swift/UVOT UVW2 filter photometry monitoring observations of the mid M dwarf flare star GJ1243 simultaneously with the HST/COS NUV spectroscopy for 56 HST orbits (=144ks) and TESS photometry, which are approved as the HST Treasury program. These simultaneous data will constrain the spectral peak and slope in the NUV during flares, thus physically explain the origin of the flare in the low stellar atmosphere through the heating by accelerated particles. The Swift/UVOT NUV photometry can supplement the HST NUV spectroscopy. The science products delivered as part of this unprecedented program time-resolved NUV spectra along with best-fit models on a wider wavelength range from UV through red-optical wavelengths will also benefit multiple communities (e.g., exoplanet studies).

2023100 / JACOBSON-GALAN / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY), USA

"SYNTHESIZING SWIFT AND FLASH SPECTROSCOPY AS A NOVEL PROBE OF MASS-LOSS"

The ultraviolet (UV) phase space of type II supernovae (SNe II) in the first week after explosion is almost entirely unconstrained. Intriguingly, the UV contains some of the most crucial information about both the most local circumstellar environment around the red supergiant progenitor prior to explosion as well as encodes the complexities of density, ionization and temperature in the outermost SN ejecta. Here we propose a focused investigation that will utilize the novel combination of very early-time UV/optical spectroscopy through an approved "Flexible Thursday" disruptive Target of Opportunity Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cycle 31 program and Swift UV/X-ray observations in order to explore the diversity of red supergiant atmospheres and mass-loss as well as SN II ejecta structure.

2023102 / JOFFRE / CLEMSON UNIVERSITY, USA

"UNCOVERING THE MOST POWERFUL JETS THROUGH COSMIC TIME"

For the very first time we have detected 4 ROMA-BZCAT high redshift blazars in the 20-200 MeV band that lack X-ray data. These powerful MeV blazars, and other sources detected in our catalog, will pave the way to the exploration of the MeV sky as performed by COSI. We request to observe all 4 with Swift for a total of 45 ks. The XRT observations will let us detect the proposed sources in the soft X-ray band, accurately measure the spectral shape and flux in this band, and to sample the onset of the inverse Compton emission. These properties are fundamental to determining the power of the jet and to deriving the shape of the underlying electron population responsible for the emission. Measuring the accretion disk emission with UVOT will reveal the disk s luminosity and the black hole mass.

2023104 / MEHDIPOUR / SPACE TELESCOPE SCIENCE INSTITUTE, USA

"CATCHING TRANSIENT OBSCURING OUTFLOWS IN AGN WITH SWIFT"

Transient obscuring outflows are remarkably different from the commonly seen warm-absorber outflows in AGN. They exhibit large columns of high-velocity gas close to the accretion disk. They shield much of the X-ray radiation, which can have important implications for the launch of AGN winds. Joint ToO observations with XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and HST, triggered using Swift monitoring, have been vital for ground-breaking results on transient obscuration events. We propose weekly Swift monitoring of a sample of six suitable AGN to trigger an already-approved XMM+NuSTAR+HST program. This will enable us to investigate the outstanding questions on the link between obscuration and outflows, and broaden our understanding of these transient events. In total 82 ks of Swift time is requested.

2023113 / VAN DEN EIJNDEN / UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK, UK

"SWIFT/VLA MONITORING OF THE DECAY OF A GIANT BE/X-RAY BINARY OUTBURST"

The recent discoveries of radio jets produced by highly magnetized neutron stars in Be/X-ray binaries (BeXRBs) is important for several areas of research. Firstly, it has opened up an unexplored parameter regime to study the launching conditions of jets. Secondly, it provides a novel avenue to complement existing X-ray studies to better understand the accretion flow in BeXRBs. We propose 20 ks of Swift monitoring and 6 hr of VLA time to study the decay of a BeXRB giant outburst. The main aims are to i) determine if a sharp transition in the X-ray flux and spectral evolution is common for this class of objects, ii) gain insight into the debated origin of the X-ray emission after this transition, iii) map out the behaviour of the jet in this regime, and its connection to the accretion flow.

2023120 / WALTON / UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE, UK

"TESTING THE LENSE-THIRRING MODEL FOR ULX VARIABILITY WITH NGC5907 ULX1"

Following a series of remarkable recent discoveries, it is now clear that some of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) population are actually powered by highly super-Eddington neutron stars. NGC5907 ULX1 is the most extreme of these, exhibiting a remarkable peak luminosity of ~1e41 erg/s, as well as X-ray off-states (where the flux drops by a factor of ~100 or more) and a clear ~78d super-orbital X-ray period when active. Although the source has spent much of the last few years in an off-state, it is now more frequently returning to its ULX state, and is also showing evidence for its 78d cycle when it does. This presents a unique opportunity to test the Lense-Thirring interpretation for the super-orbital periods seen in ULX pulsars with continued Swift monitoring.

2023124 / AUCHETTL / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (SANTA CRUZ), USA

"SWIFT'S MULTI-WAVELENGTH VIEW OF THE NEXT NEARBY TDE"

Current optical surveys are poised to find a number of TDEs before maximum light, granting us the opportunity to track the most crucial, yet currently missing, phase of their evolution. Probing the early phase of a TDE will advance our understanding of the emission mechanisms acting in these fascinating transients, which are linked to some of the most important astrophysical questions related to: black hole demographics, accretion disk formation and super-Eddington accretion. We propose to monitor 1 TDE discovered before peak with Swift. These data will place constraints on the early-time energetics of TDEs, which are critical for breaking the degeneracies in current TDE emission models as we continue to explore the TDE phase space.

2023131 / GEZARI / JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, USA

"VENTURING INTO THE IMBH FRONTIER WITH TDES"

We plan to push the frontier of tidal disruption event detections into the intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) regime. In order to do this, we will target faint and fast-evolving nuclear transients in dwarf galaxies. While we will use optical surveys for the discovery of TDE candidates, we will rely on systematic {\it Swift} UV and X-ray follow-up to produce the first sample of bonafide TDEs in galaxies below $10^{9} M_\odot$. This sample will enable the study of the TDE rate at the low-end of the black hole mass function, a sensitive probe of the black hole occupation fraction, one of the most promising constraints on primordial black hole seed formation models.

2023142 / GUEVEL / UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON, USA

"DIAGNOSE THE NATURE OF THE TEV HALO HESS J1813-126 WITH SWIFT-XRT"

TeV halos are extended very high energy γ-ray emitting regions surrounding middle-aged pulsars. They were recently discovered by air shower γ-ray experiments including the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) and Large High-Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO). TeV halos are significantly more extended than pulsar wind nebulae and their nature is largely unknown. In addition, nearby halos could confine GeV-TeV positrons so understanding them is crucial to the indirect dark matter search. This observation has the potential to identify the first X-ray counterpart to a TeV halo

2023143 / SHENG / CLEMSON UNIVERSITY, USA

"DISCOVERING HIGH-Z BL LACS WITH SWIFT/UVOT"

The class of AGNs called blazars are prominent members of Fermi detected sources. The study of blazar evolution with redshift is important as they also provide a powerful diagnostic tool to study the evolution of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL). Using blazars as cosmological probes requires knowledge of their redshift. We propose to jointly use Swift-UVOT and SARA-CT/ORM, a 0.65m and 1m telescope in Chile and Spain, respectively, to derive photometric redshifts for sources above z~1.3. This method makes use of 10 UV-optical filters, which allows for reliable redshift measurements. This project will deliver measurements of the Spectral Energy Distributions for 20 4LAC blazars and establish photometric redshifts for those with z > 1.3.

2023146 / FUERST / EUROPEAN SPACE ASTRONOMY CENTRE (ESAC), SPAIN

"SWIFT MONITORING OF THE ULTRA-LUMINOUS X-RAY PULSAR NGC 7793 P13"

One of the most interesting ultra-luminous X-ray pulsars (ULXPs) is NGC 7793 P13, which stands out owing to its high duty cycle of pulsations, as well as being the only ULX pulsar where we know both the nature of the companion star and the full orbital ephemeris. Here we propose to continue the Swift monitoring program of P13, adding to the data taken in the last AOs and making full use of the combined power of the XRT and the UVOT. These observations will allow us to follow-up on the known X-ray and UV flux periods of the system and investigate the duty cycle of low- or off-states, one of which occurred between 2020-2021. They will also allow us to monitor other bright and transient X-ray sources in NGC 7793, like the black-hole candidate P9.

2023148 / KENNEA / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, USA

"SWIFT LOCALIZATION OF MAXI DISCOVERED GALACTIC X-RAY TRANSIENTS IN CYCLE 20"

We propose to use Swift to localize Galactic X-ray transients discovered by MAXI. MAXI scans almost the entire X-ray sky every ̃92 minutes, with a source detection sensitivity of ̃60 mCrab in one orbit and ̃15 mCrab in one day, discovering X-ray transients with 0.1-0.5 degree accuracies in the 2-20 keV energy band. Swift provides rapid follow-up of MAXI triggers and localization up to 1.4 error radius, which is vital for identifying any optical/radio counterpart. XRT observations will also provide measurements of the low energy X-ray spectra. UVOT data will provide astrometric corrections and possibly optical counterparts. Swift is proven to be uniquely capable in this task.

2023153 / GOKUS / WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS, USA

"GAMMA-RAY FLARES OF HIGH-REDSHIFT BLAZARS"

We propose a ToO observation and follow-up campaign of a high-z (z>=3) blazar during a gamma-ray flare detected by Fermi/LAT. We request 63\,ks split into a total of 14 observations. This proposal asks for a continuation of the trigger opportunity accepted in Swift Cycle 19. Only 12 high-z blazars have been detected at gamma rays. Being the most luminous objects in the Universe, their detection enables studies of the formation of AGN in the early Universe. Because the high-energy hump of their SED peaks in the MeV band, simultaneous X-ray and gamma-ray data are needed to constrain their high-energy emission peak. We request simultaneous X-ray and optical/UV data with Swift during high gamma-ray activity of a high-z blazar. The data will be complemented by triggered radio observations.

2023156 / GUOLO / JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, USA

"MONITORING OF THE SUPER-LONG QUASI-PERIODIC X-RAY ERUPTER SWIFT J0230+28"

Quasi-Periodic Eruptions (QPEs) are high-amplitude, repeating X-ray flashes from external galaxies that are possible probes of the interactions between orbiting bodies with massive black holes. Swift has recently discovered a new source (Swift J0230+28) that shows quasi-periodic X-ray eruptions with a recurrence time of $\sim$ 22 days. We request a 90-day-long monitoring campaign, with daily 500s visits with Swift/XRT, to probe the evolution of the amplitudes and recurrence times of the eruptions. This campaign will allow us to constrain the long-term evolution of Swift J0230+28's properties, as compared with other QPE sources, and to constrain theoretical models, particularly in assessing the orbital trigger hypothesis, which requires a somewhat stable evolution of the recurrence times.

2023162 / DHUGA / GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, USA

"X-RAY/UV MONITORING OF 2 LOW LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI"

We propose a monitoring campaign of 2 Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (LLAGN) from UV to X-ray. The variability time-scales of these sources are weeks to months, hence, our monitoring will establish their variability, any correlation between the X-ray hardness and brightness, and the X-ray/UV flux ratio as function of brightness. Such studies have been done for bright AGN but are lacking for individual LLAGNs. The low accretion rate in these sources is thought to be a key factor in determining the dynamics of the accretion flow near the central black hole. These sources can serve as test beds to not only compare with bright AGNs but also to refine the theoretical picture of radiatively-inefficient accretion flows thought to power the nuclear emission in these systems.

2023163 / KENNEA / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, USA

"KEY PROJECT: THE DETECTION AND MONITORING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC COUNTERPARTS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SOURCES WITH SWIFT IN O4"

We seek to identify and observe EM counterparts to GW events during the latter half of the fourth LIGO/Virgo/KAGRA observing run (O4). We request deep follow-up observations at high priority in order to monitor and characterize EM candidates detected by \Swift{} or other observatories. Based on lessons learned during O2 and O3, we also propose to greatly enhance the \Swift{} GW follow-up program with new initiatives. These include optimizing the follow-up strategy and trigger criteria, enhancing transient detection abilities by utilizing pre-imaging surveys, searching for prompt emission in BAT data, and refactoring the Swift observing plans for the higher rates and smaller localizations O4 will yield.

2023165 / TUBIN / LEIBNIZ-INSTITUT FUR ASTROPHYSIK POTSDAM (AIP), GERMANY

"PROVING THE X-RAY PERIODICITY OF AN EROSITA-SELECTED SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARY CANDIDATE WITH SWIFT"

Using eROSITA and NICER archival data, we discovered a promising SMBHB candidate based on a tentative X-ray periodic-like light curve. We requested a monitoring campaign of 20 snapshots of 5 ks each spaced by one week. The Swift campaign is needed to track the flux modulation on a weekly time scale, discriminate red-noise-induced variability, or accurately determine the period of the signal. Thus, if we confirm the periodic nature of the source, we will determine the details of follow-up observations to confirm the binary nature. If successful, this Swift program will be the precursor of a large X-ray campaign and this project will be able to discover the closest-distance SMBHB ever.

2023166 / BROWN / TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY, USA

"NOT DONE YET: TEMPLATE OBSERVATIONS OF SWIFT SUPERNOVAE"

The Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) has revolutionized the understanding of supernova (SN) behavior in the ultraviolet (UV). Swift has observed over 1000 SNe, including examples of all major classes and most subtypes. This has enabled detailed studies of individual objects, many of which were the first of their kind observed in the UV, and the differences within SN subgroups. These studies rely on having the best possible photometric precision. Much of the original SN photometry is contaminated by the underlying host galaxy light. We propose reobserving the host galaxies of 104 Swift supernovae to obtain SN-free measurements of the host galaxy flux at the SN position. This will improve the accuracy and usefulness of the SN photometry already obtained.

2023170 / TORRES-ALBA / CLEMSON UNIVERSITY, USA

"SWIFT TOOS FOR FERMI GALACTIC PLANE TRANSIENTS"

Fermi has detected hundreds of transients with short (sec to hr) and long (months) variability timescales. However, weekly timescale transients remain mostly unexplored. The Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA) allows to systematically search the whole sky for weekly transients. The novelty of FAVA resides in using the mission-long data to provide an estimate of the average sky intensity against which weekly data are compared. This makes FAVA an unbiased and fast tool to find transients in the Galactic plane where the diffuse emission is the brightest. FAVA detects about 7 new galactic transients per year. We propose to use Swift to follow up on the most promising 2. The population of Galactic transients is under-sampled and detecting even 1 new source will have a major impact.

2023173 / DICHIARA / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, USA

"SEARCHING HIGH AND LOW FOR ELUSIVE SHORT GRBS"

We propose a follow-up program dedicated to the search for the optical/nIR counterparts of short duration (< 2 s) gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) using our accepted programs on space-based and ground-based telescopes. We will use photometric and spectroscopic measurements to estimate the redshifts of these sGRBs, study their afterglows and identify any signatures of a radioactive-powered kilonova. The proposed work is critical for identifying the population of high redshift (z > 1) sGRBs and rare nearby (z < 0.1) events. It will greatly enhance the science return of Swift observations, and provide a vital complement to gravitational wave astronomy.

2023176 / BORGHESE / INSTITUTO DE ASTROFISICA DE CANARIAS, ITALY

"SWIFT MONITORING OF MAGNETAR OUTBURSTS"

Powered by the instabilities and decay of their huge magnetic field, magnetars are characterized by a distinctive high-energy flaring phenomenology: short bursts of X-/gamma-rays, often accompanied by enhancements of the persistent X-ray luminosity, referred to as outbursts. Magnetar-like activity was detected from isolated neutron stars with a broad range of magnetic field strengths. Moreover, the detection of a fast radio burst-like burst from a Galactic magnetar has proved that at least a sub-group of fast radio bursts can be powered by magnetars. We propose to follow one outburst from a known or new magnetar with Swift during the first months to gather new physical insights on magnetars surface, field configuration and magnetosphere.

2023180 / KENNEA / THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, USA

"IDENTIFYING THE ELECTROMAGNETIC COUNTERPARTS TO COSMIC NEUTRINO SOURCES"

Swift is a powerful facility for multi-messenger astronomy, having identified the first EM counter- parts to both high-energy neutrino and gravitational wave events. We propose to observe the 90% error regions of well-localised neutrinos with a high probability of cosmological origin detected by IceCube and, for the first time, KM3NeT. We request a total of 55.5 ks of approved ToO time.

2023182 / BUSON / UNIVERSITY OF WUERZBURG, GERMANY

"THE X-RAY HADRONIC IMPRINT IN NEUTRINO-EMITTER BLAZARS"

We propose a pilot study to observe with Swift-UVOT/XRT and NuSTAR a well-defined sample of blazars associated with IceCube neutrinos. If these blazars originate neutrinos, they are powered by hadronic processes. Within the blazar hadronic framework, the emission in the X-ray band provides the most sensitive diagnostics of the hadronic contribution to the spectral energy distribution (SED) in these sources. The Swift-UVOT/XRT observations, along with NuSTAR simultaneous spectra, will provide us with broadband, simultaneous multi-wavelength SEDs of the astrophysical objects, that will be tested with theoretical expectations from leptonic and hadronic modelling.

2023192 / LUNA / UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE HURLINGHAM, ARGENTINA

"THE BRIGHTEST NOVA IN THE LAST 80 YEARS."

The goal of this proposal is to obtain high S/N, high cadence and multiwavelength Swift s observations during and after the next eruption of the symbiotic recurrent nova T CrB. Swift s unique capabilities makes it an ideal instrument to follow what is expected to be the brightest nova since 1946. T CrB may experience its next nova eruption during Swift AO20. The proposed observations will provide the necessary data to estimate the white dwarf mass and the ejecta mass, which when compared with the mass accretion rate during quiescence, constitute the critical parameters that will determine the fate of this prime candidate for a SN Ia progenitor.

2023196 / RAVI / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (DAVIS), USA

"HIGH-CADENCE UV LIGHT CURVES OF EXTREMELY YOUNG SUPERNOVAE"

In the hours after explosion, supernovae (SNe) provide important clues about their progenitors and explosion mechanisms. We are conducting a 12-hour cadence SN search of nearby galaxies to find them as young as possible -- all supported by rapid ground-based imaging and spectroscopy. For several events, our program and rapid ground-based follow-up have revealed early light curve features that point to shock breakout or interactions with circumstellar material or a companion star. Here we request rapid, high-cadence (6 hours) UV light curves of all nearby young SNe found within 24 hours of explosion (within 40 Mpc). This set of up to five SNe, combined with rapid ground-based follow-up, will directly constrain their progenitor systems and explosion physics.

2023206 / PRINCE / CENTRUM FIZYKI TEORETYCZNEJ POLSKIEJ AKADEMII NAUK , POLAND

"INVESTIGATING THE X-RAY/UV CORRELATIONS WITH INTENSIVE SWIFT MONITORING IN A NEWLY DISCOVERED BRIGHT AND MASSIVE AGN"

SMSS J114447.77-430859.3 is a newly discovered bright quasar (V=14.4 mag) at a redshift z=0.83, with a black hole mass, logM=9.4. We propose to monitor the source in Swift-XRT and UVOT to examine the X-ray - UV correlations. With coordinated intensive ground-based monitoring, we plan to determine the accretion disk size and structure via an intensive broadband reverberation mapping experiment. This experiment will enable us to understand the accretion disk and the corona structure on one of the most massive quasars ever observed, as well as their underlying connections. We request continuous 1 ks Swift visits in Cycles-20 and 21 with a 3-day cadence as a part of the Swift Key Project. This experiment can be done only with Swift and will provide a lasting legacy for years to come.

2023217 / KRUMPE / LEIBNIZ-INSTITUT FUR ASTROPHYSIK POTSDAM (AIP), GERMANY

"CONSTRAINING THE TIMESCALES OF MAJOR ACCRETION TRANSITION IN AGN"

Using the eROSITA all-sky scans a sample of AGN showing extreme X-ray variability was established. For the 28 most significant changes, Swift follow-up observations 2-4 years ago were triggered. These objects have proven to be new changing-look AGN. We propose to obtain new X-ray/UV data of all (28x4 ks = 112 ks) targets to test whether these objects have now reached a stable state or whether they still show strong variability 2-4 years after their initial changing-look discovery. In combination with approximately simultaneous new optical spectroscopy, the data will be used to study i) the timescales of accretion changes in SMBH, ii) the response of AGN structural components to changes in the accretion state, and iii) the cause of the changing-look behavior in AGN.

2023221 / HERNANDEZ-GARCIA / UNIVERSIDAD DE VALPARAISO, CHILE

"CHARACTERIZING THE EXOTIC NUCLEAR TRANSIENT AT2021HDR"

Swift time is requested to follow-up an exotic transient in an AGN with properties not seen in known systems. Its optical light curve used to be consistent with a classic Seyfert 1 nucleus well characterized by its optical spectrum and high-energy properties. However, since late 2021 the nucleus started to present sudden brightening episodes in the form of oscillating peaks in the ZTF alert stream. The same shape is observed in X-rays and UV. It is argued that this does not fit as a standard TDE, BSMBH or CL AGN, neither does it look like previous observed AGN flares, and disk instabilities seem an unlikely scenario. Intensive monitoring of AT2021hdr is requested to probe whether this source could be a special case of the aforementioned classes or if it represents a new kind of variation.

2023227 / SANTANDER / UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA, USA

"BLAZARS AS NEUTRINO SOURCES: IDENTIFYING HADRONIC EMISSION WITH SWIFT"

Given their extremely energetic emission, gamma-ray blazars have long been suggested as sources capable of accelerating cosmic rays, and that therefore may also produce neutrinos. The detection of an IceCube high-energy neutrino in temporal and spatial coincidence with a flaring blazar has strengthened the case for these sources to be responsible for at least part of the high-energy astrophysical neutrino flux observed by IceCube. As hadronic models most often predict high X-ray fluxes, the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory is uniquely positioned to test this hypothesis by performing follow-up observations of promising neutrino source candidates. These observations are therefore crucial in understanding the multiwavelength properties of blazars as candidate hadronic sources.

2023233 / MARCOTULLI / YALE UNIVERSITY, USA

"DOUBLING THE SAMPLE OF YOUNG LOW-POWER GAMMA-RAY JETS"

We propose to observe 5 new candidates gamma-ray narrow line Seyfert galaxies (NLSYs) with combined XRT and NuSTAR observation. These sources are detected in the 4FGL catalog, though lacking any counterpart association, and are found to be positionally coincident with known SDSS NLSys. High-quality X-ray data of these 5 candidate gamma-NLSYs provide the only means to confirm the presence of a jet in the NLSy systems (hence classifying them as gamma-NLYs), and study the energetics and properties of these newly detected (possibly) nascent jets. Moreover, only 8 gamma-NLSys are known to date. Therefore these XRT and NuSTAR observations would increase the known sample by 60%.

2023236 / KYNOCH / UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON, UK

"THE DRIVING CONTINUUM OF THE SUPER-EDDINGTON QUASAR PDS 456"

We propose to monitor the nearby, super-Eddington quasar PDS 456 in X-rays and UV. Large spectroscopic and photometric monitoring in the near-UV to near-IR is being conducted from the ground with the aim of determining the reverberation radius of its broad emission line region (BLR) for the first time. There is emerging evidence that the BLR radii of highly-accreting quasars are systematically smaller than predicted by extrapolating from local Seyferts, and this discrepancy is linked to the brightness and spectral shape of the ionising UV/X-ray continuum. Swift is uniquely capable of making regular, simultaneous, X-ray and sensitive UV observations to track UV/X-ray continuum that drives longer-wavelength variations and sets the size scales under investigation.

2023238 / LEVINE / YALE UNIVERSITY, USA

"OBSERVING HIGH-ENERGY RADIATION EVAPORATE AN EXOPLANET"

The dearth of short-period, Neptune-sized planets is a decade-old puzzle in exoplanet occurrence. A leading hypothesis is that underdense giant planets lose their atmospheres from XUV-driven photoevaporation. To test this hypothesis, we propose Swift monitoring of the host star WASP-69 contemporaneously with planned ground-based measurements of its exoplanet s mass-loss outflow. Swift s unique multi-wavelength capabilities will constrain the high-energy environment powering the atmospheric outflow, thereby eliminating order-of-magnitude uncertainty that would otherwise stem from unknown stellar XUV flux in the epoch of the ground-based measurement. Without Swift, the determination of whether WASP-69b's atmosphere will survive for astronomical timescales may be in question.

2023240 / YOUNG / UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS (AMHERST), USA

"EXPLORING THE EVOLUTION OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS SPIRALS"

Low surface brightness (LSB) spirals present a mystery: why are they blue despite low star-formation rates? Why are the SFRs low despite ample HI gas? To answer these questions, we request observations of five galaxies with Swift UVOT. These observations, along with optical IFU spectra and near-IR images, will determine the star-formation histories of these galaxies. These histories will allow us to test hypotheses concerning low LSB spirals: Did they begin with an early burst of star formation, similar to high surface brightness galaxies, and then fizzle out? Does episodic or bursty star formation keep them blue without building up extensive stellar populations? UV imaging is an essential component of the SEDs because it breaks the age/reddening/metallicity degeneracies.

2023243 / BODEWITS / AUBURN UNIVERSITY, USA

"THE ACTIVITY AND EVOLUTION OF OORT CLOUD COMETS"

We propose to use Swift UVOT to characterize the activity and evolution of the dynamically new Oort cloud comet C/2023 A3 (Tsuchinshan-ATLAS), which is exceptionally bright even at large distances from the Sun. We will use photometric imaging to measure production rates of OH (a direct proxy for water) and dust over the course of its apparition. Swift's unique UV capabilities will allow us to assess the onset, demise, and relative contributions of water released by different sources on the nucleus and in the coma as it is increasingly heated by the Sun. We will evaluate the effects of the first solar passage on the activity and erosion of this dynamically new comet and compare this with the behavior of comets of different dynamical ages.

2023261 / SOKOLOSKI / COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, USA

"DRIVING NOVA THEORY WITH PRE-ERUPTION MONITORING OF T CRB"

The immediate goal of this proposal is to use Swift UVOT, XRT, and BAT monitoring of the symbiotic recurrent nova (SyS RN) T CrB as it approaches its next eruption to determine the physical origin of the pre-eruption dip, which is challenging to explain with standard nova theory. We expect new understanding of the pre-eruption dip to reveal whether: 1) low-level nuclear shell burning can in fact lead to an observational precursor months to years before a nova; or: 2) some previously unrecognized phenomenon both causes the precursor event and triggers the thermonuclear flash. Either option would constitute a major shift in our understanding of recurrent novae. T CrB is the best target for this study, Swift is the only facility that can carry it out, and it is extremely time sensitive.

2023264 / DURBAK / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK), USA

"RIMAS: THE RAPID IMAGER AND SPECTROGRAPH; A NEW TOOL FOR HIGH-REDSHIFT GRBS"

RIMAS is a new NIR instrument designed expressly to identify high-redshift GRBs from Swift, scheduled to be installed on the 4.3 m Lowell Discovery Telescope during the Spring 2024 semester. RIMAS can operate in and switch rapidly (10s of seconds) between three modes: simultaneous 2-band imaging; high-throughput, R25 and R300 NIR spectroscopy; high-resolution (R4500), echelle spectroscopy providing simultaneous coverage from 0.9 2.4 m. Unlike most classically scheduled facilities, RIMAS will be continuously available for rapid-response (3 minutes) ToO observations. By the completion of Cycle 20, RIMAS will be routinely obtaining rapid multi-color photometry and NIR spectra of Swift afterglows to measure their redshifts and constrain properties of their host galaxies and the IGM.

2023265 / CHAKRABORTY / MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, USA

"UNDERSTANDING THE DIVERSITY OF UNEXPECTED LATE-TIME BEHAVIOR IN TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS"

The canonical picture of Tidal Disruption Events (TDEs) suggests the soft X-ray emission should rise on timescales of 1 month then decline as t^-5/3, but in recent years, Swift, eROSITA, and NICER repeated monitoring has revealed they frequently do not follow this simple prescription. A growing handful of TDEs have shown unexpected X-ray behaviors at late times, including late-time brightening, spectral hardening, repeated rebrightening. Discovering these is difficult because of the frequent lack of coverage at late times; we aim to correct this bias with a fill-in proposal to obtain updated late-time X-ray/UV flux measurements of all previously detected TDEs and systematically determine the ubiquity of late-time X-ray rebrightening and hardening.

2023269 / FOLEY / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (SANTA CRUZ), USA

"A NEW WINDOW INTO COMPACT OBJECT PHYSICS: THE WIDEST BINARIES"

Stellar-mass black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs) have been largely identified through the intense X-ray emission produced by the infall of gas from a close, non-degenerate companion star. The third Gaia data release opened a novel method: identification of a dark object by the astrometric motion of a luminous companion. Two astrometrically identified BHs have already been confirmed with radial velocity data. We propose to obtain simultaneous UVOT and XRT imaging of systems with a high chance to host either a NS or BH; X-rays to search for any emission produced by accretion from the companion and UV to eliminate contamination from white dwarfs. These data will help confirm the nature of and characterize systems in an as-yet poorly understood regime of compact object physics.

2023278 / CHORNOCK / NIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY), USA

"SEEING THE DISK: LATE-TIME SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF TDES"

Tidal disruption events occur when a star passes too close to a supermassive black hole and is disrupted and subsequently accreted. The process by which the stellar debris forms an accretion disk is one of the main theoretical uncertainties in this process. While at early times the accretion process may be obscured by reprocessing or the light output dominated by shocks, recent observations have shown that after 100 days, the bare accretion disk becomes visible in the UV and X-rays, a phase of TDE evolution that has not been well sampled in previous events. The properties of this accretion disk reflect both the accretion process and the black hole mass. We propose multi-epoch observations of a sample of 6 TDEs with Swift/UVOT and XRT to study the emergence of TDE accretion disks.

2023281 / EYLES-FERRIS / UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER, UK

"FOLLOW-UP OF TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS DETECTED BY EINSTEIN PROBE AND SVOM"

Tidal disruption events (TDEs) remain poorly understood with unanswered questions such as how super-Eddington accretion affects the accretion flow and drives the observed emission and how the disrupted star s orbit affects the TDE. Einstein Probe and SVOM, launching in the coming months, will vastly expand the TDE population through their novel wide-field X-ray instruments. With real time access to the data from these facilities, we will be able to rapidly identify TDEs and related sources such as quasi-periodic eruptors (QPEs). We propose to follow-up a substantial sample of ten sources with Swift to fully explore these objects with XRT and UVOT allowing us to properly constrain their X-ray spectra, probe any rapid variability and determine their UV properties. In total, we request 130 ks.

2023284 / ISLAM / UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (BALTIMORE COUNTY), USA

"UNRAVELLING THE PHYSICS OF SUPERORBITAL MODULATIONS IN SUPERGIANT HIGH MASS X-RAY BINARIES WITH SWIFT"

We propose to exploit Swift's perfectly suited capabilities to unveil the physical mechanisms driving the superorbital variability in supergiant X-ray binaries. Our science objectives require a monitoring of these systems along their different superorbital phases to measure likely stable and periodic changes in the absorption column density, flux and slope of the continuum emission across ~10 superorbital cycles. Short Swift observations (2 observations of 1 ks per week per source) will allow us to study in detail the mechanisms driving the superorbital variability in a representative classes of sources 4U 1538-52 and 4U 1909+07.

2023287 / PELLEGRINO / UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, USA

"SWIFT TEMPLATE OBSERVATIONS FOR LEGACY TRANSIENT ARCHIVES"

The UVOT has been the workhorse instrument of UV Transient studies since Swift's launch. We have a NASA ADAP project to build a next-generation UV-NIR transient archive for the community that will be useful for a variety of purposes including: template lightcurve creation, bolometric lightcurves and corrections, and data-driven training sets for classification. To maximize the yield from UVOT observations of these transients, we require "template" observations for image subtraction; host-galaxy subtracted images are crucial to obtaining accurate lightcurves across all transient timescales. This proposal requests Swift UVOT observations of 33 host galaxies of our best-observed transients to enable precision science for our community archive and other archival transient work.

2023288 / LIN / NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY, USA

"TWO UNIQUE SOURCES IN A ROW: ESO 243-49 HLX-1 AND A NEWBORN HARD TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT"

In Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory GI Cycle 20, we seek 36x1 ks snapshots (10-day cadence) to simultaneously observe two unique nearby objects: the intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1 and a recent hard tidal disruption event (TDE). For HLX-1, we aim to trace the evolution of outburst separation time, likely linked to the aperiodic orbital period, and investigate the system's ultimate fate, including potential donor star ejection. Regarding the new TDE, our goals are to detect giant, fast X-ray flares, as observed previously and to identify recurrent outbursts, an intriguing feature in multiple TDEs.

2023290 / WANG / JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, USA

"TRACING THE EVOLUTION OF SNE IBN/ICN WITH SWIFT"

A growing number of supernovae (SNe) are now known to exhibit evidence for significant interaction with a dense, pre-existing, circumstellar medium (CSM). SNe Ibn/Icn comprise one such class that can be characterized by rapidly evolving light curves, persistent narrow line and lack of H-features. The origin of such a dense CSM in these stripped-envelope systems remains a pressing question, specifically concerning the progenitor system and mass-loss mechanism. New advances in theoretical modeling allow for UV photometry to distinguish between progenitor mass, compositions, and shock interaction power. Archival data sets are limited in size and scope. Thus, we propose a program to systematically observe SNe Ibn/Icn with Swift in optical, UV and X-ray, providing the largest sample to date.