The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Italian site U.K. site

Swift Cycle 9 Results

The lists below contain the proposals recommended by the Cycle 9 Peer Review panel. Note that in addition to the accepted programs below, ToO requests for exceptional transients will continue to be possible through the Swift ToO web site, even for ToOs not accepted into the GI Program. The decision on whether or not to observe a ToO of either category will be made by the Swift Principal Investigator.

PIs of Cycle 9 proposals for observation: Please note that the Cycle 9 ROSES 2012 Appendix D.5 "Swift Guest Investigator Cycle 9" states:

"It is the responsibility of the PI to alert the Swift Observatory Duty Scientist when trigger conditions for their accepted ToO have been met. This is done through the Swift ToO Request Form at https://www.swift.psu.edu/secure/toop/too_request.htm. It is highly recommended that ToO proposers register as Swift ToO users in advance at https://www.swift.psu.edu/secure/toop/too_newuser.php. Registration is required in order to submit a ToO Request."

ToO proposals must have an astrophysical trigger. Once the trigger criteria have been met for an approved target, the PI should check if the target location is more than 5 hours in RA from the Sun and more than 20 degrees from the Moon before requesting Swift observations (http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Tools/Viewing.html). ToO observations that require more than 6 ks on a given day and are closer to the Sun than 5 hours RA will be less likely to be approved unless they are of exceptionally high scientific priority. Observations greater than 9 hours in RA from the Sun are particularly desirable. The purpose of the anti-Sun restriction for ToOs is to maximize the amount of time Swift is pointed toward the night sky in order to optimize optical follow-up observations of BAT-detected GRBs.

Accepted Cycle 9 ToO proposals may be triggered between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014.

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Funding Only Proposals

Proposal PI	    Title
9120044 LAZZATI NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF EARLY AFTERGLOWS AND OPTICAL/INFRARED FLASHES: AN UNTAPPED GOLD MINE
9120100 BUTLER THE REIONIZATION AND TRANSIENTS IR CAMERA: A HIGH-Z GRB SEARCH MACHINE
9120149 VESTRAND RAPTOR OBSERVATIONS OF THE PROMPT AND EARLY OPTICAL AFTERGLOW EMISSION
9120006 ZAUDERER A RENAISSANCE OF GRB RADIO STUDIES WITH THE JANSKY VLA
9120016 NYSEWANDER THE GRB AFTERGLOW ARCHIVE
9120017 PROCHASKA GRB AFTERGLOWS AS PROBES
9120111 LIEN HIGH REDSHIFT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM SWIFT
9120139 TENDULKAR NIR FOLLOWUP OF FLARING MAGNETARS

Observing Proposals

Definition of Columns

  1. Proposal: Proposal number assigned by Swift mission
  2. PI: Principal Investigator's last name
  3. Num: Target number as listed on the proposal form
  4. Target_Name: Target name as listed on proposal forms
  5. RA: Right Ascension (equinox J2000) in degrees
  6. Dec: Declination (equinox J2000) in degrees
  7. Time: Total observing time approved, in ksec
  8. ToO: "Y" if Target of Opportunity proposal, otherwise "N"

Prop   |PI           |Target_Num|Target_Name         |RA      |Dec     |Time |TOO
9120004|GRUPE        |  1       |ESO 242-G008        |  6.2508|-45.4928|  3.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        |  2       |QSO 0056-36         | 14.6558|-36.1014|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        |  3       |RX J0100.4-5113     | 15.1129|-51.2317|  3.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        |  4       |RX J0105.6-1416     | 16.4117|-14.2706|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        |  5       |RX J0117.5-3826     | 19.3775|-38.4417|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        |  6       |MS 0117-28          | 19.8987|-28.3589|  6.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        |  7       |MKN 1048            | 38.6575| -8.7878|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        |  8       |RX J0319.8-2627     | 49.9529|-26.4533|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        |  9       |RX J0349.1-4711     | 57.2821|-47.1844|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 10       |FAIRALL 1116        | 57.9237|-40.4667|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 11       |FAIRALL 1119        | 61.2571|-37.1875|  4.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 12       |1H 0419-577         | 66.5029|-57.2006|  1.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 13       |RX J0437.4-4711     | 69.3675|-47.1917|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 14       |1H0707-495          |107.1729|-49.5519|  3.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 15       |RX J0859.0+4846     |134.7621| 48.7692|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 16       |RX J0902.5-0700     |135.6400| -7.0011|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 17       |PG 0953+414         |149.2204| 41.2561|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 18       |RX J1005.7+4332     |151.4246| 43.5447| 10.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 19       |CBS 126             |153.2633| 35.8567|  3.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 20       |MKN 141             |154.8025| 63.9675|  6.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 21       |TON 1388            |169.7862| 21.3217|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 22       |EXO 1128+6908       |172.7700| 68.8647|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 23       |CASG 855            |176.1246| 36.8858|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 24       |RX J1209.8+3217     |182.4383| 32.2839|  8.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 25       |PG 1307+085         |197.4458|  8.3297|  3.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 26       |IRAS 13224-3809     |201.3308|-38.4147|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 27       |MCG-6-30-15         |203.9737|-34.2956|  1.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 28       |IRAS 1334+24        |204.3279| 24.3842|  4.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 29       |TON 730             |205.9863| 25.6467|  3.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 30       |RX J1413.6+7029     |213.4029| 70.4972|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 31       |MKN 813             |216.8542| 19.8314|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 32       |MKN 841             |226.0050| 10.4378|  1.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 33       |MKN 876             |243.4883| 65.7197|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 34       |KUG 1618+410        |244.9638| 40.9800|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 35       |RX J2217.9-5941     |334.4858|-59.6917|  8.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 36       |RX J2245.3-4652     |341.3346|-46.8700|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 37       |RX J2258.7-2609     |344.6892|-26.1539|  3.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 38       |RX J2301.6-5913     |345.4008|-59.2222|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 39       |RX J2304.6-3501     |346.1571|-35.0203|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 40       |RX J2312.5-3404     |348.1450|-34.0722|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 41       |RX J2317.8-4422     |349.4579|-44.3744|  5.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 42       |IRAS 23226-3843     |351.3508|-38.4469|  2.0|N  
9120004|GRUPE        | 43       |RX J2349.4-3126     |357.3504|-31.4342|  8.0|N  
9120005|ROMANO       |  1       |TOO SFXT            |  0.0000|  0.0000| 20.0|Y  
9120007|ANDREON      |  1       |CL2081              |  0.1668| 14.5521|  3.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      |  2       |CL2045              | 22.8872|  0.5560|  2.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      |  3       |CL2068              | 23.6743| -0.6042| 16.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      |  4       |CL2007              | 46.5722| -0.1400| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      |  5       |CL3009              |136.9769| 52.7905| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      |  6       |CL3000              |163.4024| 54.8679|  3.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      |  7       |CL1033              |167.7957|  1.1048|  7.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      |  8       |CL1330              |170.5160|  0.9481| 19.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      |  9       |CL1014              |175.2993|  5.7348| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 10       |CL1020              |176.0285|  5.7983| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 11       |CL1038              |179.4660|  5.0604| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 12       |CL1015              |182.5700|  5.3860| 19.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 13       |CL1134              |184.3693|  4.1833| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 14       |CL1120              |188.6292|  3.9763| 15.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 15       |CL1049              |188.8987|  1.7753|  9.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 16       |CL1225              |188.9548|  1.8696|  9.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 17       |CL1034              |192.3087| -1.6874| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 18       |CL1132              |195.1428| -2.1341| 13.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 19       |CL3049              |203.3055| 60.0565|  5.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 20       |CL1030              |206.1357|  2.9541| 18.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 21       |CL1001              |208.2767|  5.1498| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 22       |CL1122              |211.9530|  5.3625| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 23       |CL1067              |212.0616|  5.4657| 12.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 24       |CL1018              |214.3617|  2.0469| 14.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 25       |CL1256              |216.0688|  2.7905| 20.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 26       |CL1141              |217.5788| -1.7877| 12.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 27       |CL1011              |227.1073| -0.2663|  3.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 28       |CL1047              |229.2174| -0.9029| 10.0|N  
9120007|ANDREON      | 29       |CL3020              |232.3110| 52.8639|  3.5|N  
9120015|WOODWARD     |  1       |TBD                 |  0.0000|  0.0000| 60.0|Y  
9120021|SOLERI       |  1       |GRS 1915+105        |288.7983| 10.9456| 30.0|Y  
9120022|SOLERI       |  1       |SWIFT J1753.5-0127  |268.3679| -1.4525| 30.0|Y  
9120025|SIEGEL       |  1       |M3                  |205.5484| 28.3773| 50.0|N  
9120025|SIEGEL       |  2       |M2                  |322.4929| 12.1670| 42.0|N  
9120033|WILLIAMS     |  1       |NEW VHE BLAZAR #1   |  0.0000|  0.0000| 15.0|Y  
9120033|WILLIAMS     |  2       |NEW VHE BLAZAR #2   |  0.0000|  0.0000| 15.0|Y  
9120033|WILLIAMS     |  3       |NEW VHE BLAZAR #3   |  0.0000|  0.0000| 15.0|Y  
9120037|AJELLO       |  1       |SWIFT J2052.1-5704  |313.0431|-57.0746|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       |  2       |SWIFT J1857.9-7830  |284.4808|-78.5051|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       |  3       |SWIFT J0455.8-7531  | 73.9748|-75.5235|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       |  4       |SWIFT J2109.2-0942  |317.3138| -9.7074|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       |  5       |SWIFT J0923.9-3142  |140.9865|-31.7136|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       |  6       |SWIFT J0727.5-2406  |111.8861|-24.1162|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       |  7       |SWIFT J0300.4-1048  | 45.1010|-10.8013|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       |  8       |SWIFT J1354.4-3746  |208.6050|-37.7778|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       |  9       |SWIFT J2123.8+2506  |320.9543| 25.1000|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       | 10       |SWIFT J0233.4+2754  | 38.3534| 27.9000|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       | 11       |SWIFT J1304.4-0532  |196.1000| -5.5486|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       | 12       |SWIFT J2021.8+4400  |305.4511| 44.0000|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       | 13       |SWIFT J0259.0-5717  | 44.7509|-57.3000|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       | 14       |SWIFT J1214.0+2932  |183.5000| 29.5494|  5.0|N  
9120037|AJELLO       | 15       |SWIFT J1139.2+0336  |174.8000|  3.6000|  5.0|N  
9120043|BODEWITS     |  1       |COMET 2P/ENCKE      |  0.0000|  0.0000| 25.5|N  
9120047|JORSTAD      |  1       |BLAZAR1             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 24.0|Y  
9120047|JORSTAD      |  2       |BLAZAR2             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 24.0|Y  
9120048|TOMSICK      |  1       |BH TRANSIENT        |  0.0000|  0.0000| 57.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      |  1       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      |  2       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      |  3       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      |  4       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      |  5       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      |  6       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      |  7       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      |  8       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      |  9       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 10       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 11       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 12       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 13       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 14       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 15       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 16       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 17       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 18       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 19       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120059|PERKINS      | 20       |FERMI FLARING BLAZAR|  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120063|MILLER       |  1       |BLACK HOLE TRANSIENT|  0.0000|  0.0000| 50.0|Y  
9120066|MARGUTTI     |  1       |SLSN1               |  0.0000|  0.0000| 28.0|Y  
9120066|MARGUTTI     |  2       |SLSN2               |  0.0000|  0.0000| 28.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       |  1       |MAXI TRANSIENT #1   |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       |  2       |MAXI TRANSIENT #2   |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       |  3       |MAXI TRANSIENT #3   |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       |  4       |MAXI TRANSIENT #4   |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       |  5       |MAXI TRANSIENT #5   |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       |  6       |MAXI TRANSIENT #6   |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       |  7       |MAXI TRANSIENT #7   |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       |  8       |MAXI TRANSIENT #8   |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       |  9       |MAXI TRANSIENT #9   |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120068|KENNEA       | 10       |MAXI TRANSIENT #10  |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      |  1       |3C 273              |187.2779|  2.0524|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      |  2       |IGR J21247+5058     |321.1637| 50.9739|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      |  3       |3C 454.3            |343.4906| 16.1482|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      |  4       |MRK 421             |166.1138| 38.2088|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      |  5       |1ES0120+340         | 20.7863| 34.3469|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      |  6       |RGB J0214+517       | 33.5748| 51.7478|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      |  7       |1ES0647+250         |102.6933| 25.0500|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      |  8       |1ES 1028+511        |157.8272| 50.8933|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      |  9       |1ES1255+244         |194.3830| 24.2111|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 10       |1ES 1741+196        |265.9910| 19.5858|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 11       |AO 0235+164         | 39.6753| 16.6241|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 12       |GB6 B1310+4844      |198.1806| 48.4753|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 13       |TXS 0716+332        |109.8309| 33.1193|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 14       |SGR 1806-20         |272.1640|-20.4110|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 15       |SGR 1833-0832       |278.4350| -8.5190|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 16       |SGR 1801-23         |269.4880|-22.9470|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 17       |SGR 0418+5729       | 64.6060| 57.4890|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 18       |SGR 0501+4516       | 75.2780| 45.2762|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 19       |SGR 1900+14         |286.8090|  9.3220|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 20       |SGR 1822+1606       |275.5958|-16.0997|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 21       |LS I 61+303         | 40.1320| 61.2293|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 22       |HESS J0632+057      | 98.2430|  5.8060|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 23       |LS 5039             |276.5627|-14.8484|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 24       |GRS 1915+105        |288.8000| 10.9400|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 25       |IGR J17464-3213     |266.5650|-32.2340|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 26       |XTE J1118+480       |169.5450| 48.0370|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 27       |CYG X-3             |170.3000|-60.6170|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 28       |3A 0114+650         | 19.5112| 65.2916|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 29       |CYG X-1             |299.5910| 35.2020|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 30       |4U 0115+634         | 19.6300| 63.7400|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 31       |1A 0535+262         | 84.7250| 26.3170|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 32       |GRO J1008-57        |152.4420|-58.2933|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 33       |GX 1+4              |263.0000|-24.7500|  3.0|Y  
9120070|PERKINS      | 34       |SAX J2103.5+4545    |315.8990| 45.7570|  3.0|Y  
9120074|MCENERY      |  1       |LAT GRB             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120078|KELLY        |  1       |PG 1426+015         |217.2774|  1.2851| 60.0|N  
9120089|GEZARI       |  1       |TDE-1               |  0.0000|  0.0000|  6.0|Y  
9120089|GEZARI       |  2       |TDE-2               |  0.0000|  0.0000|  6.0|Y  
9120089|GEZARI       |  3       |TDE-3               |  0.0000|  0.0000|  6.0|Y  
9120089|GEZARI       |  4       |TDE-4               |  0.0000|  0.0000|  6.0|Y  
9120089|GEZARI       |  5       |TDE-5               |  0.0000|  0.0000|  6.0|Y  
9120091|TOMSICK      |  1       |BH HARD STATE       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 20.0|Y  
9120091|TOMSICK      |  2       |BH HARD STATE       |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120091|TOMSICK      |  3       |BH HARD STATE       |  0.0000|  0.0000| 10.0|Y  
9120092|HORESH       |  1       |RTC1                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120092|HORESH       |  2       |RTC2                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120092|HORESH       |  3       |RTC2                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120092|HORESH       |  4       |RTC4                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120092|HORESH       |  5       |RTC5                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120092|HORESH       |  6       |RTC6                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120092|HORESH       |  7       |RTC7                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120092|HORESH       |  8       |RTC8                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120093|BODAGHEE     |  1       |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120093|BODAGHEE     |  2       |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120093|BODAGHEE     |  3       |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120093|BODAGHEE     |  4       |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120093|BODAGHEE     |  5       |NEW IGR SOURCE      |  0.0000|  0.0000|  2.0|Y  
9120101|DEGENAAR     |  1       |QUIESCENT SOURCE    |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120101|DEGENAAR     |  2       |QUIESCENT SOURCE    |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     |  1       |PTF1                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     |  2       |PTF2                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     |  3       |PTF3                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     |  4       |PTF4                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     |  5       |PTF5                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     |  6       |PTF6                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     |  7       |PTF7                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     |  8       |PTF8                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     |  9       |PTF9                |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     | 10       |PTF10               |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     | 11       |PTF11               |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120112|KASLIWAL     | 12       |PTF12               |  0.0000|  0.0000|  5.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        |  1       |SN_IA_1             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        |  2       |SN_IA_2             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        |  3       |SN_IA_3             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        |  4       |SN_IA_4             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        |  5       |SN_IA_5             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        |  6       |SN_IA_6             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        |  7       |SN_IA_7             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        |  8       |SN_IA_8             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        |  9       |SN_IA_9             |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120114|BROWN        | 10       |SN_IA_10            |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120121|NELSON       |  1       |NOVA 1              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 12.0|Y  
9120121|NELSON       |  2       |NOVA 2              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 12.0|Y  
9120121|NELSON       |  3       |NOVA 3              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 12.0|Y  
9120121|NELSON       |  4       |NOVA 4              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 12.0|Y  
9120121|NELSON       |  5       |NOVA 5              |  0.0000|  0.0000| 12.0|Y  
9120121|NELSON       |  6       |NOVA MONITOR 1      |  0.0000|  0.0000| 18.0|Y  
9120121|NELSON       |  7       |NOVA MONITOR 2      |  0.0000|  0.0000| 18.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      |  1       |1ES 0033+595        |  8.9692| 59.8344| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      |  2       |B3 0133+388         | 24.1358| 39.0998| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      |  3       |RGB J0152+017       | 28.1652|  1.7880| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      |  4       |IC 310              | 49.1793| 41.3248| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      |  5       |1ES 0647+250        |102.6937| 25.0499| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      |  6       |1ES 1011+496        |153.7672| 49.4335| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      |  7       |1ES 1215+303        |184.4670| 30.1168| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      |  8       |PKS 1222+216        |186.2269| 21.3796| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      |  9       |3C 279              |194.0465| -5.7893| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 10       |1ES 1440+122        |220.7010| 12.0111| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 11       |1ES 1727+502        |262.0776| 50.2196| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 12       |1ES 1741+196        |265.9910| 19.5858| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 13       |HESS J1943+213      |295.9792| 21.3022| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 14       |VCS1 J2001+4352     |300.3036| 43.8813| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 15       |MRK 421             |166.1138| 38.2088| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 16       |H 1426+428          |217.1358| 42.6747| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 17       |MRK 501             |253.4676| 39.7602| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 18       |1ES 1959+650        |299.9994| 65.1485| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 19       |BL LAC              |330.6804| 42.2778| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 20       |1ES 2344+514        |356.7705| 51.7050| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 21       |1ES 1218+304        |185.3414| 30.1770| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 22       |1ES 1553+113        |238.9293| 11.1901| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 23       |MRK 180             |174.1100| 70.1576| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 24       |1ES 0806+524        |122.4550| 52.3162| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 25       |W COMAE             |185.3820| 28.2329| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 26       |3C 66A              | 35.6650| 43.0355| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 27       |PKS 1424+240        |216.7517| 23.8000| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 28       |RGB J0710+591       |107.6252| 59.1389| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 29       |1ES 0229+200        | 38.2025| 20.2882| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 30       |RBS 0413            | 49.9658| 18.7594| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 31       |1ES 0414+009        | 64.2184|  1.0901| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 32       |1ES 0502+675        | 76.9846| 67.6233| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 33       |VER J0521+211       | 80.4792| 21.1900| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 34       |RXJ0648.7+1516      |102.1979| 15.2733| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 35       |S5 0716+714         |110.4727| 71.3434| 10.0|Y  
9120122|FALCONE      | 36       |B3 2247+381         |342.5241| 38.4103| 10.0|Y  
9120125|BARTHELMY    |  1       |XRF1                |  0.0000|  0.0000| 12.0|Y  
9120125|BARTHELMY    |  2       |XRF2                |  0.0000|  0.0000| 12.0|Y  
9120127|HOMAN        |  1       |SOFT X-RAY TRANSIENT|  0.0000|  0.0000| 35.0|Y  
9120131|CACKETT      |  1       |NGC 5548            |214.4980| 25.1368|166.0|N  
9120132|HAGGARD      |  1       |SGR A*              |266.4167|-29.0078| 68.0|N  
9120138|KRIMM        |  1       |SWIFT JXXXX.X+XXXX  |  0.0000|  0.0000| 60.0|Y  
9120138|KRIMM        |  2       |SWIFT JXXXX.X+XXXX  |  0.0000|  0.0000| 30.0|Y  
9120138|KRIMM        |  3       |BHC JXXXX.X+XXXX    |  0.0000|  0.0000| 60.0|Y  
9120138|KRIMM        |  4       |BHC JXXXX.X+XXXX    |  0.0000|  0.0000| 60.0|Y  
9120143|LEWIS        |  1       |XMMSL J013900+174613| 24.7500| 17.7700|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        |  2       |XMMSL J034501-35318 | 56.2560|-35.5170|  1.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        |  3       |XMMSL J052515-750416| 81.3150|-75.0720|  1.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        |  4       |XMMSL J112928+013126|172.3680|  1.5240|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        |  5       |XMMSL J115223-673841|178.0990|-67.6450|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        |  6       |XMMSL J135428+634348|208.6190| 63.7300|  1.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        |  7       |XMMSL J173809+600605|264.5380| 60.1020|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        |  8       |XMMSL J184014-160825|280.0590|-16.1400|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        |  9       |XMMSL J220258-211405|330.7420|-21.2350|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 10       |XMMSL J231147-290349|347.9470|-29.0640|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 11       |XMMSL J024435+520453| 41.1460| 52.0810|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 12       |XMMSL J073949-073715|114.9570| -7.6210|  1.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 13       |XMMSL J074129-070855|115.3730| -7.1490|  1.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 14       |XMMSL J075118-665728|117.8290|-66.9580|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 15       |XMMSL J093909-211252|144.7900|-21.2150|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 16       |XMMSL J121400+270327|183.5040| 27.0570|  1.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 17       |XMMSL J182826+465742|277.1110| 46.9620|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 18       |XMMSL J212249+755019|320.7080| 75.8390|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 19       |XMMSL 225100+781447 |342.7540| 78.2460|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 20       |XMMSL J150628+533255|226.6174| 53.5488|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 21       |XMMSL J161943+531501|244.9318| 53.2513|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 22       |XMMSL J174715+632113|265.1542| 52.1954|  2.0|N  
9120143|LEWIS        | 23       |XMMSL 212920-065858 |322.3327| -6.9819|  1.0|N  
9120152|DEGENAAR     |  1       |GALACTIC CENTER     |266.4000|-28.9833|248.0|N  
9120153|CHAKRABARTY  |  1       |SAX J1808.4-3658    |272.1151|-36.9787|  5.0|Y  
9120153|CHAKRABARTY  |  2       |SAX J1808.4-3658    |272.1151|-36.9787| 45.0|Y  
9120120|BODEWITS     |  1       |HIP80831            |247.6068|-10.4414|  1.3|N  
9120120|BODEWITS     |  2       |HIP81047            |248.3010|-12.7989|  1.3|N  
9120120|BODEWITS     |  3       |HIP82388            |252.5215|-12.3875|  1.3|N  
9120120|BODEWITS     |  4       |HIP80857            |247.6724|-13.1163|  1.3|N  
9120120|BODEWITS     |  5       |HIP80217            |245.6328|-12.4286|  1.3|N  
9120120|BODEWITS     |  6       |BD-12 4536          |248.1260|-12.7636|  1.3|N  
9120120|BODEWITS     |  7       |WD1615-154          |244.4803|-15.5977|  1.3|N  
9120120|BODEWITS     |  8       |HD 145939           |243.5280|-13.9694|  1.3|N  
9120120|BODEWITS     |  9       |HIP80537            |246.6318|-12.6047|  1.3|N  
9120120|BODEWITS     | 10       |HIP81899            |250.9307|-17.5149|  1.3|N  

Proposal Abstracts

9120044 DAVIDE LAZZATI/NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY

"NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF EARLY AFTERGLOWS AND OPTICAL/INFRARED FLASHES: AN UNTAPPED GOLD MINE"

 

The early afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts is of great importance for understanding the fireball dynamics and composition and for the identification of high-redshift events. We propose to use state of the art hydrodynamical simulations coupled to a synchrotron radiation code to explore the dynamical and radiative properties of the forward-reverse shock system. This study will focus on the relation between inhomogneities in the fireball and variability in the light curve as well as on the relation of such variability with that of the prompt emission (either internal shocks or photospheric). In addition, we will provide reliable estimates of the optical/IR flash brightness, a fundamental parameter in assessing our capability to detect and/or identify high-redshift events.

 

9120100 NATHANIEL BUTLER/ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

"THE REIONIZATION AND TRANSIENTS IR CAMERA: A HIGH-Z GRB SEARCH MACHINE"

 

With substantial funds from the Swift Cycles 5, 6, 7 and 8 GI programs, we have built RATIR, a simultaneous optical/NIR imaging camera which will be 100% time-dedicated to the followup of Swift GRBs. The camera is mounted on an automated 1.5m telescope at Pedro San Martir in Baja CA. With rapid slew capability and autonomous interrupt capabilities (now fully implemented), the system will image GRBs in 6 bands (riZYJH) within minutes, detecting optically faint afterglows in the NIR and quickly alerting the community to potential z>5 GRBs. We are currently finalizing RATIR commissioning process. For Cycle 9, we are requesting support to move from construction to science operations.

 

9120149 W. THOMAS VESTRAND/LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

"RAPTOR OBSERVATIONS OF THE PROMPT AND EARLY OPTICAL AFTERGLOW EMISSION"

 

We propose to study the optical emission from gamma ray bursts (GRBs) with our RAPTOR (RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response) system. RAPTOR is a suite of ground-based optical telescopes with unique capabilities for exploring the prompt optical emission and early afterglow from GRBs. Six 0.4-meter rapid response telescopes will collect simultaneous 4-color (clear-VRI) photometry of the prompt optical emission starting 6 seconds after receipt of the GRB trigger. Those spectral measurements will be complimented by observations of the sub-second variability from the prompt phase through the early afterglow. A set of wide-field optical monitors that cover the entire Swift field-of-view will be used to search for precursor emission and measure bright prompt emission before the GRB trigger.

 

9120004 DIRK GRUPE/THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"LONG-TERM VARIABILITY OF THE SEDS OF AGN"

 

We propose to re-observe a sample of 43 X-ray bright AGN in order to study the long-term variability of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The first goal of this program is to understand the scatter in the relations found amoung AGN, e.g. the alpha-ox - luminosity relation and the correlations found with the Eddington ratio. The second goal is to catch at least one of these AGN in a deep minimum X-ray flux state in order to trigger a still ongoing, recently re-approved XMM-Newton ToO program with the aim to investigate in detail the X-ray spectra during these low states.

 

9120005 PATRIZIA ROMANO/ISTITUTO DI ASTROFISICA SPAZIALE E FISICA COSMICA-PALERMO

"SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERGIANT FAST X-RAY TRANSIENTS IN OUTBURST"

 

Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) are a class of high mass X-ray binaries associated with OB supergiant companions displaying short, recurrent, and bright flares reaching peak luminosities of a few 1E36 erg/s. Their properties of hard X-ray spectra and, in a few cases, the detection of X-ray pulsations resemble those of accreting pulsars; however, the physical mechanisms producing their outbursts are still highly debated. We ask for 1 Swift (20 ks) triggered observation from a sample of confirmed and candidate SFXTs when in outburst, to perform broadband spectroscopy, search for variability in the absorbing column density, follow the light curve throughout the outburst, look for pulsations due to spin periods, and refine the position when not known at arcsecond level.

 

9120006 B ZAUDERER/HARVARD UNIVERSITY

"A RENAISSANCE OF GRB RADIO STUDIES WITH THE JANSKY VLA"

 

Radio afterglows have been fundamental for our understanding of GRBs, but their study has stagnated in the Swift era due to a lack of sensitivity. With the EVLA, the field is experiencing a second renaissance. Our on-going EVLA program has already yielded critical results, including the discovery of dark GRB afterglows, reverse shock detections, and the discovery of radio emission from the tidal disruption event Sw1644+57. We will continue to address several critical open questions: (i) the composition of the GRB ejecta; (ii) the physics and progenitors of short GRBs; (iii) the diversity of GRB explosions; (iv) the properties of high-z GRBs; and (v) the on-going emission from Sw1644+57 and future TDEs. We request partial salary support for a postdoc leading this effort.

 

9120007 STEFANO ANDREON/OSSERVATORIO ASTRONOMICO DI BRERA INC.

"THE SWIFT X-RAY UNBIASED VIEW OF LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS"

 

Scaling relations of galaxy clusters have been generally derived from X-ray selected samples. However, it is becoming evident that X-ray selected samples offer a biased view of the cluster population, and that the scale relations derived from them could be misleading. We propose here to measure scaling relations, such as Lx-M, Lx-T, based on an `X-ray unbiased sample' of 44 clusters in the nearby Universe, 36 of which we ask to be observed with XRT. In A08 we were awarded time to observe all them, but only ten have been observed as of Sept 2012. We therefore ask to execute in AO9 observations not carried out in A08, for a total of about 303 ks if no other observation of our program will be carried out.

 

9120015 CHARLES WOODWARD/UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

"SWIFT X-RAY/UV TOO MONITORING OF A BRIGHT NOVA IN OUTBURST"

 

We propose a 60 ks Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) campaign for one (1) bright classical or recurrent nova in outburst using the rapid response and multi-wavelength capabilities of Swift to obtain simultaneous gamma-ray, X-ray and ultraviolet (UV) observations. Swift provides unique insight into the novae phenomena during all the evolutionary phases, revealing many new and currently poorly understood events including phases of persistent hard X-rays as well as episodes of rapid and variable X-ray/UV emission. Swift ToO, supplemented with data from Fermi/LAT monitoring and our extant ground based optical/infrared (IR) and radio programs will grow the temporal and panchromatic archive of these events, requisite to glean the underlying physics of these new phenomena and novae evolution.

 

9120016 MELISSA NYSEWANDER/UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA

"THE GRB AFTERGLOW ARCHIVE"

 

We propose to create the GRB Afterglow Archive, a new and complete catalogue of all GRB afterglow observations. By creating this archive we fulfill a clear and immediate need within the GRB community. It will not only be a vital tool in precision modeling efforts and population studies, but it will also serve as a hub for cross-institution collaboration. Data in the archive will consist primarily of published data collected from the literature, but can also include unpublished data submitted by members of the afterglow follow-up community. This new resource will be made accessible to the public via an online database with interactive visualization tools.

 

9120017 JASON PROCHASKA/UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (SANTA CRUZ)

"GRB AFTERGLOWS AS PROBES"

 

We propose to continue our on-going effort to carry out target-of-opportunity (ToO) observations of GRBs discovered with Swift. The primary objective of the proposed program is to apply the GRB afterglows as a background source for studying physical properties of intervening gas both in the local GRB progenitor environment and in the foreground galaxies along the line of sight. To reach the goal, we have been conducting rapid (< 6 hours) spectroscopic follow-up of well-localized afterglows through various ToO programs on different ground-based facilities, including the Keck telescopes, Gemini, Lick Observatory, Magellan Telescopes, and the Apache Point telescope.

 

9120021 PAOLO SOLERI/RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN

"FOLLOWING THE MICROQUASAR GRS 1915+105 TO QUIESCENCE"

 

We propose to observe the microquasar GRS 1915+105 with a sequence of ToO observations, should the source end its current 20-year-long outburst during the 9th Swift observing cycle. After its discovery in 1992 it has always been very bright: its properties suggest that its quiescent X-ray flux would be rather high (~10^34 erg/s), allowing to study the evolution of the spectrum and to test models for quiescent emission in black-hole binaries. Swift exceptional flexibility will allow us to choose the best strategy to follow the decay into quiescence according to the actual source behaviour.

 

9120022 PAOLO SOLERI/RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN

"TOO OBSERVATIONS OF THE OUTBURST DECAY OF SWIFT J1753.5-0127"

 

The accretion/ejection coupling in black hole binaries has been described by an empirical X-ray/radio luminosity relation. However, many sources are fainter in radio than expected from the correlation. Recent results showed that in the black holes H1743-322 and XTE J1752-223 the slope of the X-ray/radio correlation changes at ~5E-3 L_Edd. This suggests that their accretion flow is radiatively efficient in the hard state above ~5E-3 L_Edd, unlike other sources. We propose to observe the radio quiet black hole Swift J1753.5-0127 with a sequence of X-ray/radio ToO observations, should the source end its current outburst. Swift J1753.5-0127 is the best candidate to test whether in radio quiet black holes the radiative efficiency of the accretion flow changes during the decay to quiescence.

 

9120025 MICHAEL SIEGEL/THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"A SWIFT/UVOT STUDY OF RR LYRAE STARS"

 

RR Lyrae variable stars are a component of the cosmic distance ladder and a contributor to the integrated ultraviolet (UV) light of unresolved extragalactic stellar populations. However, there have been few studies made of RR Lyrae stars in the UV despite the large (2-8 mag) amplitudes of their pulsations in the UV and the insights UV light curves could provide on the astrophysics of pulsating stars. We propose a survey of two of the most RR Lyrae-rich globular clusters in the Galaxy. This survey, designed for minimal impact on Swift operations, will produce the first large catalog of precise UV light curves for RR Lyrae stars, providing critical insight into these important stars and into the UV properties of unresolved extragalactic stellar populations.

 

9120033 DAVID WILLIAMS/UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (SANTA CRUZ) USA

"TARGET OF OPPORTUNITY MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF NEW TEV BLAZARS"

 

We propose target of opportunity observations of blazars showing strong evidence with VERITAS of being new very-high-energy gamma-ray sources. The known TeV blazars have spectral energy distributions with a synchrotron peak in the X-ray/UV/optical bands and a second peak at GeV energies, often thought to be inverse Compton emission. The VHE detection of a blazar often occurs when the blazar is in an active state, potentially lasting only a few days. Swift X-ray and UV observations during the discovery observations by VERITAS will probe the correlated flux and spectral variability patterns of the highest energy electrons. This will unveil information on the energetics and time scales of particle acceleration and cooling, critical to understanding the physics of jets in these new sources.

 

9120037 MARCO AJELLO/UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"SWIFT, NUSTAR AND THE ORIGIN OF THE COSMIC X-RAY BACKGROUND"

 

We propose a quick snapshot program with Swift/XRT to observe the remaining 15 AGN detected by BAT in 60 months of observations that do not have any X-ray observation in the 2-10 keV band. These AGN are expected to be absorbed on average by LogNH=23 and as such are the perfect target for a 5ks observation (each) with XRT. This will make complete the current BAT sample of AGN that counts 361 objects detected in the local Universe. We will use this sample to determine the space density of Compton-thick AGN and to study the physics of the torus. Moreover, this sample will be used in connection with the samples detected by NuSTAR (at z=0.5-1.0) to determine the growth and evolution of AGN, the contribution to the background, and the accretion history of the Universe.

 

9120043 DENNIS BODEWITS/UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK)

"THE ROTATION AND COMPOSITION OF OLD COMET 2P/ENCKE"

 

Comet 2P/Encke is a fascinating, complex object. Despite it being one of the most studied comets, Encke s activity is puzzling and its behavior poorly understood. We propose to use Swift UVOT to characterize seasonal and diurnal activity of Comet 2P/Encke by measuring production rates of OH and other fragment species. We will determine the rotation period and inhomogeneity of the nucleus, and study its chemical and physical evolution. Swift is uniquely suited to characterize the comets molecular composition at UV-optical wavelengths, and by its rapid cadence characterize changes in the temporal development and composition of released gas, required for this investigation.

 

9120047 SVETLANA JORSTAD/BOSTON UNIVERSITY

"MULTI-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF FLARING GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS"

 

We propose to observe two blazars with the XRT at 0.3-10 keV and UVOT (all 6 filters) during a 2 week period of a flaring activity state. The blazars should be from the list of gamma-ray blazars which we monitor with the VLBA at 43 GHz and at optical wavelengths. We will determine (1) the lag between the synchrotron and Compton light curves at various frequencies, (2) dependence of spectral index on wavelength, (3) relative amplitudes of variability at different wavebands, and (4) the timing of changes in VLBI images at mm wavelengths relative to outbursts at shorter wavelengths. This information is needed for theoretical modelling that should constrain the mechanism(s) of high energy photon production in blazar jets.

 

9120048 JOHN TOMSICK/UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"BLACK HOLE TRANSIENTS DURING OUTBURST DECAY"

 

An important step in improving our understanding of black hole (BH) jets is to determine the physics of BH systems in their hard state, which is the only BH state in which a steady and powerful jet is seen. We propose to use Swift to monitor a BH transient in the hard state during outburst decay. Swift will be used to follow the evolution of the flux and energy spectrum in order to: 1. Study correlations between X-rays and radio measurements made at ATCA; 2. Trigger an INTEGRAL observation to study possible non-thermal hard X-ray emission; and 3. Trigger a Suzaku observation to constrain the system geometry.

 

9120059 JEREMY PERKINS/NASA/GSFC & UMBC

"FERMI-LAT INITIATED TOO'S FOR BRIGHT FLARING GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS"

 

In the Fermi/Swift era, the high gamma-ray flux alerts provided by the all-sky monitoring of the LAT give unique opportunities to study the optical to gamma-ray emission from blazars during such states. We propose to obtain prompt Swift XRT/UVOT ToO observations of bright gamma-ray (>= 1.0E-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1; >100 MeV) flaring blazars detected by Fermi-LAT. At such high gamma-ray states, the LAT observes more than 20 such events per year, thus we request up to 20 Swift triggers of 2 x 5 ks each. The Swift and LAT observations will allow a broad-band characterization of each flaring blazar, providing constraints on models for the optical to gamma-ray emission.

           

9120063 JON MILLER/UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

"A SWIFT, SMARTS LOOK AT STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE ACCRETION"

 

The ability of Swift to make frequent observations of stellar-mass black hole outbursts, simultaneously in X-rays and in O/UV, taps an important discovery space. The evolution of disks with mass accretion rate, prescriptions that extend beyond simple Shakura-Sunyaev emissivity profiles, disk-jet connections, and role of jets in the broad-band SED of stellar mass black holes can all be tested with a dedicated effort. In concert with dedicated SMARTS monitoring in B, V, R, I, J, H, and K, as well as planned radio observations, we request 50 1-ksec observations of a stellar-mass black hole in outburst. This program continues a similar, successful Swift + SMARTS program initiated in Cycle 8.

 

9120066 RAFFAELLA MARGUTTI/HARVARD UNIVERSITY

"EXPLOSION MECHANISMS AND ENERGY SOURCES POWERING SUPER-LUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE"

 

With peak luminosities L>7d43 erg/sec, the new class of Super Luminous Super Novae (SLSNe) outshine standard SN explosions of a factor ~10 and represent the death of the most massive stars in our Universe. Their exceptional luminosity requires exotic explosion mechanisms and/or sources of energy whose nature is unclear. Here we propose rapid Swift follow up of 2 SLSNe discovered by PanSTARRS to map their UV and X-ray emission during the early stages of their evolution as part of our multi-wavelength effort through our approved programs on the EVLA (radio) and HST (NIR). The final aim is to: (i) Pin down the energy source of SLSNe; (ii) Map the diversity of their progenitor stars and pre-explosion evolution.

 

9120068 JAMIE KENNEA/THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT LOCALIZATION OF MAXI DISCOVERED GALACTIC X-RAY TRANSIENTS"

 

We propose to continue the highly successful Swift Cycles 6, 7 and 8 program to use Swift to perform follow-up observations of Galactic X-ray Transients newly discovered by MAXI. Swift is a uniquely complementary mission to MAXI, providing rapid follow-up observations of MAXI triggers and accurate X-ray localization to between 2 and 5 arcsec error, vital for identifying an optical counterpart. UVOT will be used both to provide astrometric corrections to the localization, and to search for any optical counterparts of these transients. Swift s unique scheduling flexibility and ability to perform low-overhead short observations, combined with its multi-wavelength capabilities tuned for localization of transient X-ray events, make it the only observatory capable of performing this task.

 

9120070 JEREMY PERKINS/NASA/GSFC & UMBC

"QUASI-SIMULTANEOUS XRT AND VERITAS TOO'S OF FLARING HARD X-RAY OBJECTS"

 

We request quasi-simultaneous XRT and VERITAS target of opportunity observations of select flaring hard X-ray transients. This program is designed to obtain crucial information in the 0.3 to 10 keV band necessary to model the broad-band spectral energy distributions of these objects. VERITAS has undertaken a program to perform immediate very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) follow-up observations of select flaring hard X-ray sources seen by the BAT and the addition of XRT observations will dramatically enhance our capability to understand the underlying physical processes.

 

9120074 JULIE MCENERY/NASA/GSFC

"SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF FERMI-LAT DETECTED GRBS"

 

The small sample of extremely energetic Fermi-LAT detected GRBs with spectral coverage up to 300 GeV are providing new and exciting clues into GRB emission mechanisms. We request that Swift continues to follow-up and monitor these GRBs with rapid responses and the policies already set into place by the Swift and Fermi teams. We propose to use Swift in conjunction with Fermi to rapidly localize and disseminate GRB positions in order to facilitate ground based follow-up and redshift measurements, to perform new studies of optical to GeV afterglow emission especially with new simultaneous observations, and to study the broadband afterglow properties of the LAT-detected GRBs.

 

9120078 BRANDON KELLY/UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (SANTA BARBARA)

"WEIGHING THE MOST MASSIVE BLACK HOLES WITH X-RAY VARIABILITY

 

We will employ a combination of new Swift observations and archival data of AGN to perform the first calibration of X-ray variability as a black hole mass estimator across three orders of magnitude in black hole mass. The new Swift observations will provide variability information on the quasar PG 1426+015, which has the highest black hole mass estimate (M_{BH} ~ 1.3 x 10^9 M_{Sun}) among reverberation mapped AGN, and are essential for defining the variability scaling relationships for the most massive black holes. Our study will provide important constraints on accretion physics and calibrate X-ray variability as a mass estimator across the entire range of M_{BH} encountered by modern AGN surveys.

 

9120089 SUVI GEZARI/UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK)

"TRANSIENT PROBES OF ACCRETION PHYSICS, JET FORMATION, AND BLACK HOLE DEMOGRAPHICS"

 

Theorists first proposed that massive black holes (MBHs) will inevitably tidally disrupt and consume stars in their vicinity, and that the resulting flare of radiation could be used as a signpost for a dormant MBH lurking otherwise undetectable in the center of a galaxy. In the last decade, major progress has been made in the discovery of candidates using surveys across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the X-rays to the optical. This Swift TOO program builds upon the two recent paradigm shifts in the observational hunt for tidal disruption events (TDEs): the successful detection of the low-energy tail of hot emission from TDEs with optical surveys, and 2) the discovery of the onset hard-Xray and radio-mm emission from a jet in the nucleus of a galaxy activated by a TDE.

           

9120091 JOHN TOMSICK/UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"BLACK HOLE TRANSIENTS IN THE HARD STATE: CONSTRAINING THE SYSTEM GEOMETRY WITH NUSTAR AND SWIFT"

 

The NuSTAR satellite provides major improvements over previous hard X-ray (>10 keV) satellites in terms of sensitivity and energy resolution, enabling high-quality hard X-ray measurements of accreting black hole systems at low luminosity. This is the first time that measurements of the entire Compton reflection component from the accretion disk will be possible at low mass accretion rates in the hard state. As this is the only state where steady jets are detected, this provides a new window on the disk/jet connection by using NuSTAR to measure the system geometry (and its evolution) while measuring the strength of the jet with radio observations. This proposal enables NuSTAR to observe in this luminosity regime since the observations can only be triggered through Swift/XRT monitoring.

 

9120092 ASSAF HORESH/CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

"AN X-RAY VIEW OF NON-THERMAL TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS"

 

The unexpected discovery of the class of non-thermal tidal disruption events (NTDE) is an enduring legacy of the Swift mission. The prototype, SwiftJ1644 is now widely accepted to arise from the rejuvenation of a nuclear black hole by the tidal disruption of passing star. The event was easily detectable for months by the XRT and for even longer duration in the radio (VLA). NTDE offer unique probes of once dormant nuclear black holes in the intermediate mass range. Apart from the exotica, the statistics of these events will help us complete the census of nuclear black holes. The durability in the radio makes NTDE the dominant transients in the radio sky. Here, we propose a rapid followup with Swift of NTDE candidates found by on-going radio surveys.

 

9120093 ARASH BODAGHEE/UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (BERKELEY)

"SWIFT TOO OBSERVATIONS OF HARD X-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM THE INNER SPIRAL ARMS"

 

Swift Target of Opportunity (ToO) observations are proposed for up to 10 new hard X-ray transients discovered during the course of our approved program to regularly monitor the inner Galactic spiral arms with INTEGRAL. These regions are teeming with high-mass X-ray binaries and other transient X-ray sources such as microquasars, low-mass X-ray binaries, bursters, and magnetars. With ~1.4 Ms of observing time devoted to the Norma and Scutum Arms in the next year, our program will discover new X-ray sources, which will then trigger these Swift observations that are a crucial first step in determining their nature. Thanks to its high imaging and spectral sensitivity, Swift will allow us to obtain a precise X-ray position which is necessary for identifying counterparts at other wavelengths.

 

9120101 NATHALIE DEGENAAR/UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

"CRUST COOLING OF ACCRETION-HEATED NEUTRON STARS"

 

We propose 30 ks of Swift/XRT ToO monitoring observations of two transient neutron star X-ray binaries that make the transition from outburst to quiescence. Studying the cooling of the accretion-heated neutron star crust shortly after the end of a outburst yields unique information about the structure of the crust and a variety of nuclear reaction processes. Our proposed Swift observations will be part of a larger program involving Chandra and XMM-Newton, and allow us to track the final stages of accretion, the early phases of crust cooling, or capture unusual flux behavior.

 

9120111 AMY LIEN/NASA/GSFC & ORAU

"HIGH REDSHIFT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM SWIFT"

 

GRBs at high redshift provide a strong probe of the star-formation history in the early universe. However, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, Swift has > 500 trigger criteria based on count rates and additional thresholds for localization. We propose to use a code we developed that simulates the complex Swift trigger algorithm to (1) find a robust high-redshift GRB rate, (2) estimate the fraction of high-redshift bursts detected by Swift, (3) explore star-formation rate at early times, and (4) study possible redshift evolution of GRB properties. We also propose to improve our Swift-trigger simulator for public use.

 

9120112 MANSI KASLIWAL/CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON

"UNDERSTANDING YOUNG SUPERNOVAE AND EXOTIC TRANSIENTS WITH SWIFT AND PTF"

 

The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is a synoptic survey designed with the eponymous goal of a systematic exploration of the transient sky. PTF has demonstrated high efficiency by discovering and spectroscopically classifying 1745 transients. We are now transitioning to even faster cadence and even more rapid real-time response (iPTF). Here, we propose to continue our very productive Swift-PTF program focused on young supernovae and fast evolving transients. The proposed Swift-PTF program will be complemented with an aggressive multi-wavelength (Palomar, Magellan, Keck, APO and EVLA) program.

 

9120114 PETER BROWN/TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

"IMPROVING TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE AS STANDARD CANDLES BY CORRELATING THE ULTRAVIOLET AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES"

 

We propose to observe a sample of ten Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) in the nearby Hubble flow with Swift's Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). In coordination with the Carnegie Supernova Project 2, these SNe will have well measured peak absolute magnitudes encompassing the ultraviolet (UV), optical, and near-infrared. Analysis of these observations will show whether the UV dispersion already observed in the UV peak magnitudes and colors also has an impact on their optical luminosities, thereby affecting their usefulness as standard candles. This program capitalizes on Swift's unique strengths of rapid response, short term scheduling, and UV capabilities to improve our understanding of the standard candles essential to studies of the expanding universe.

 

9120121 THOMAS NELSON/UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

"SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE EARLIEST X-RAY EMISSION IN NOVAE"

 

We propose to continue our Swift survey of the earliest X-ray emission observed in nova outbursts. The program aims to explore the origin of the X-ray emitting shocks in novae, and the role they play in the evolution of the radio emission from the ejecta, by (1) determining the ubiquity of early hard X-ray emission in a large sample of novae, (2) assessing the timescales over which the shocks responsible for X-ray emission develop, and (3) looking for connections between the X-ray, optical and radio evolution. Understanding mass loss from novae is crucial for determining the long term evolution of the white dwarfs in these systems.

 

9120122 ABE FALCONE/THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

"THE LARGEST FLARES FROM KNOWN TEV GAMMA RAY BLAZARS: SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS WITH TOOS"

 

We propose to study known TeV blazars, most of which have never previously benefited from multiwavelength campaigns, during their highest flaring states. These proposed simultaneous multiwavelength observations will place severe constraints on the emission models. Simultaneous observations of X-ray, UV/optical, and gamma-ray emission during high states from these sources will provide the means to study relative flux, time delays, and the SED, thus enabling studies of particle acceleration and emission processes in blazar jets. Since the 1st peak of these SEDs is typically in the X-ray band and the 2nd peak is in the GeV/TeV band, Swift, VERITAS, and Fermi are ideal for these studies. The high flaring states required by the trigger criteria will ensure high science return.

 

9120125 SCOTT BARTHELMY/NASA/GSFC

"SWIFT RAPID FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF MAXI XRFS"

 

"We propose a Swift ToO program to observe XRFs detected by MAXI to identify an afterglow by the Swift NFI instruments. Our proposed faster and better GRB position from MAXI should enhance the afterglow detection of XRFs. Furthermore, our program should also increase the redshift measurements of XRFs. We request a maximum of 4 ToOs (2 XRFs) for 8 ks in total as the initial 4 tiling-mode observation, and for 4 ks as the 2nd follow-up observation to confirm the decay nature of an afterglow candidate."> 

9120127 JEROEN HOMAN/MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

" THE FINAL STAGES OF OUTBURSTS IN SOFT X-RAY TRANSIENTS"

 

We propose to observe the final stages of a soft X-ray transient (SXT) outburst. These periods of rapid evolution are often poorly studied because other missions are not sensitive enough or not able to observe or respond in time. Swift is uniquely capable of observing these fast changes, allowing us to study various aspects of accretion flows at low mass accretion rates. Our main goal is to study the rapid evolution of the thermal and non-thermal components during the soft-to-hard state transitions and subsequent decay into quiescence, where Swift has already been instrumental in providing new details. We request to observe a black hole or neutron star SXT decay with a program of up to 15 short observations (35 ks total).

 

9120131 EDWARD CACKETT/WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT UV REVERBERATION MAPPING OF NGC 5548"

 

Black hole (BH) masses are a vital component in piecing together a full picture of galaxy evolution. Estimating BH masses at high z relies on accurate scaling relations determined in the nearby universe. One powerful scaling relation, relating the broad line region radius and the AGN luminosity, the R-L relation, allows for a BH mass estimate from a single-epoch AGN spectrum. To push to z~1.5 requires the use of the UV emission line MgII where no R-L exists yet. We propose a pilot program to monitor NGC 5548 with the Swift U grism, leading to a MgII-based BH mass estimate, and paving the way for the long-needed MgII R-L relation. This will be an important Swift legacy as the lack of an MgII R-L relation hinders our understanding of the evolution of the BH mass function with redshift.

 

9120132 DARYL HAGGARD/NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

"SWIFT MONITORING OF THE ENCOUNTER BETWEEN SGR A* AND THE GAS CLOUD G2"

 

A dense, cold cloud (G2) is on a collision course with Sgr A*, the radio source at our Galactic Center. G2's orbit is eccentric and the cloud already shows signs of tidal disruption by the black hole. High-energy emission from Sgr A* will likely increase significantly due to this encounter, peaking at pericenter (mid 2013). We propose Swift monitoring to constrain the duty cycle and emission mechanisms for the brightest, hardest X-ray flares, and to study the X-ray emission properties of Sgr A* as G2 breaks up and feeds gas to the central accretion flow. We will coordinate these Swift observations with ground- and spaced-based observatories (Fermi, Chandra, XMM, and EVLA, in particular) to accomplish detailed, multiwavelength light curves throughout this unprecedented encounter.

 

9120138 HANS KRIMM/NASA/GSFC & USRA

"BAT TRIGGERED TARGET OF OPPORTUNITY OBSERVATIONS WITH SWIFT"

 

We propose to continue our highly successful Swift Cycle 4-8 program to trigger Swift observations of new sources discovered by the Hard X-ray Transient Monitor of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, and observations of known Galactic black hole sources detected in outburst by BAT. The low-energy data from the Swift XRT and UVOT will provide precise positions (for both newly discovered and poorly localized sources) and broad spectral coverage. Our team also has access to other facilities: the PAIRITEL telescope in the IR and several radio telescopes through the JACPOT XRB project. With this combined effort we will rapidly determine the source state, broadcast an early alert, follow bursting BH sources as they pass through different spectral states, and publish results from outbursts.

 

9120139 SHRIHARSH TENDULKAR/CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

"NIR FOLLOWUP OF FLARING MAGNETARS"

 

Magnetars are young, highly magnetized neutron stars that emit short, intense soft gamma-ray bursts with corresponding NIR variability. The gamma-ray bursts are frequently detected by the SWIFT BAT and followed up by the XRT. The identification of NIR counterparts allows us to study the variability and to perform proper motion measurements to a milli-arcsecond per year precision. Currently, only 6 of the 21 known magnetars have well identified NIR counterparts. We propose Target of Opportunity NIR followup of magnetars triggered from the BAT detections of flares using the 10-meter Keck telescopes and request financial support to implement our program.

 

9120143 KAREN LEWIS/COLLEGE OF WOOSTER

"SWIFT OBSERVATION OF HARD-BAND SOURCES IN THE XMM SLEW SURVEY"

 

The XMM-Newton Slew Survey is a large area X-ray survey (currently covering 50% of the sky) which has a 2-12 keV flux limit that is an order of magnitude more sensitive previous hard band all sky surveys. This survey provides a nice bridge between the hard-band sources detected in the Swift BAT survey and the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Survey.

 

9120152 NATHALIE DEGENAAR/UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

"CONTINUING A SWIFT LEGACY: THE MONITORING CAMPAIGN OF THE GALACTIC CENTER"

 

The center of our Galaxy has been monitored nearly daily with the Swift/XRT since 2006. This has proven to be an excellent setup to capture X-ray flares from Sgr A*, and to study the long-term behavior of 15 nearby X-ray binaries. In addition, the exciting discovery of a 3 Earth-mass gas cloud that approaches Sgr A* and is expected to make a close encounter in the fall of 2013, provides the rare opportunity to closely follow a disruption event and the feeding process of the supermassive black hole. We have assembled a strong observational and theoretical research team, and secured observing programs across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. We propose to continue our existing Swift/XRT monitoring program of the Galactic center in cycle 9 with daily 1-ks observations amounting to 248 ks.

 

9120153 DEEPTO CHAKRABARTY/MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

"STUDYING THE ONSET OF PROPELLER ACCRETION IN SAX J1808.4-3658 WITH NUSTAR AND SWIFT"

 

We propose a joint program with NuSTAR and Swift to monitor the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 during its return to quiescence at the end of an outburst. The goal of this campaign is to measure the hard X-ray spectrum and to detect pulsations from the source in the tail of the outburst.

 

9120120 DENNIS BODEWITS/UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK)

"DEFINITION OF UV SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC STANDARDS FOR THE ROSETTA/OSIRIS CALIBRATION"

 

The Rosetta mission will rendezvous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014, and will follow it along its orbit, investigating how the comet changes and evolves while approaching the Sun. We request Swift-UVOT observations to define a new set of 10 standard stars that will be in the two OSIRIS cameras field of view during Rosetta s approach to 67P. These stars will allow us to perform absolute calibration of the UV filters, and will provide several solar proxies necessary to interpret the images obtained through narrowband images.